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  • oxides
  • It reacts violently with water with release of hydrofluoric acid and molybdenum oxides. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Mo(CO)6 is prepared by the reduction of molybdenum chlorides or oxides under a pressure of carbon monoxide,[citation needed] although it would be unusual to prepare this inexpensive compound in the laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • In chemistry, molybdenum bronze is a generic name for certain mixed oxides of molybdenum with the generic formula A xMo yO z where A may be hydrogen, an alkali metal cation (such as Li+, Na+, K+), and Tl+. (wikipedia.org)
  • molybdenite
  • The large mining areas in Colorado ( Climax ) and in British Columbia yield molybdenite while the Chuquicamata mines in northern Chile produce molybdenum as a byproduct of copper mining. (wikidoc.org)
  • It is a silvery black solid that occurs as the mineral molybdenite, the principal ore for molybdenum. (wikipedia.org)
  • nitrogen
  • Like many of the other minerals, molybdenum is necessary to the body's ability to carry out the metabolization of fats, carbohydrates, copper and nitrogen. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • Some of the most fundamental components in soil and water chemistry-including basic interactions involving carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur-are significantly impacted by molybdenum and its role in chemical events. (whfoods.org)
  • minerals
  • Molybdenum is one of the trace minerals and although the body stores this mineral in most body tissues including the brain, liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, bones and skin, overall the levels inside the body are not that significant. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • Although perhaps not as well known as other minerals that we profile on our website, molybdenum is a key mineral nutrient found in a variety of WHFoods and known to play important roles in many different body systems. (whfoods.org)
  • Molybdenum is considered one of our essential trace minerals. (orthomolecular.org)
  • Molybdenum does not occur naturally as a free metal, it is found in various oxidation states in minerals. (americanelements.com)
  • Molybdenum minerals have been known throughout history, but the element was discovered (in the sense of differentiating it as a new entity from the mineral salts of other metals) in 1778 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele. (wikipedia.org)
  • lithium
  • Reactions are conducted in an autoclave at about 160 °C. Molybdenum bronzes are classified in three major families: Red bronzes with limiting composition A 0.33MoO 3, that is, AMo 3O 9:Lithium molybdenum red bronze Li 0.33MoO 3 Reau and others. (wikipedia.org)
  • sulfite oxidase
  • The same conclusion could be made about molybdenum as well, based on its required role in the activity of an enzyme called sulfite oxidase (SO). (whfoods.org)
  • Molybdenum is a vital part of three important enzyme systems hine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and sulfite oxidase so has a vital role in uric acid formation and iron utilization, in carbohydrate metabolism, and sulfite detoxification as well. (orthomolecular.org)
  • Molybdenum is part of sulfite oxidase, an enzyme that breaks down sulfites. (orthomolecular.org)
  • sulfur
  • In other words, we suspect a role for molybdenum in support of liver detoxification, antioxidant support, connect tissue development, and other aspects of our health due to the widespread important of sulfur balance throughout our body. (whfoods.org)
  • anion
  • The intense blue colour of the reduced anion is the basis for the use of heteropoly-molybdenum blues in quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Our understanding of molybdenum and human health did not begin with research on humans, but on soil, water, and microorganisms. (whfoods.org)
  • nitrosamines
  • In the soil and possibly in the body, as the enzyme nitrate reductase, molybdenum can reduce the production or counteract the actions of nitrosamines, known cancer-causing chemicals, especially in the colon. (orthomolecular.org)