• high molybdenum
  • "An epidemiological study involving 557 subjects in India indicated that a form of lower-limb osteoporosis may be associated with the high molybdenum content of the cereals consumed by the population. (sourcewatch.org)
  • As in the case of selenium, the sources of high-molybdenum soils are Carboniferous black shales and limestones. (teagasc.ie)
  • soluble
  • Molybdenum is soluble under a wide range of conditions, and is probably the most mobile of all the metalloid elements. (teagasc.ie)
  • molybdenite
  • The large mining areas in Colorado ( Climax ) and in British Columbia yield molybdenite while the Chuquicamata mines in northern Chile produce molybdenum as a byproduct of copper mining. (wikidoc.org)
  • disilicide
  • Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2, or molybdenum silicide), an intermetallic compound, a silicide of molybdenum, is a refractory ceramic with primary use in heating elements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molybdenum disilicide and MoSi2-based materials are usually made by sintering. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molybdenum disilicide heating elements can be used for temperatures up to 1800 °C, in electric furnaces used in laboratory and production environment in production of glass, steel, electronics, ceramics, and in heat treatment of materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molybdenum disilicide is used in microelectronics as a contact material. (wikipedia.org)
  • Metals
  • Molybdenum minerals have been known throughout history, but the element was discovered (in the sense of differentiating it as a new entity from the mineral salts of other metals) in 1778 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele. (wikipedia.org)
  • Weak oxidation of molybdenum starts at 300 °C (572 °F). It has one of the lowest coefficients of thermal expansion among commercially used metals. (wikipedia.org)
  • soils
  • Found more in molybdenum-deficient soils, nitrosamines have been associated with high rates of esophageal cancer. (orthomolecular.org)
  • In Ireland , shortage of the element is not a significant problem but on sphagnum peat soils some horticultural crops including swedes, cabbages and onions have responded to molybdenum applications (MacNaeidhe, private communication). (teagasc.ie)
  • anion
  • The intense blue colour of the reduced anion is the basis for the use of heteropoly-molybdenum blues in quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • excess
  • Under such conditions the problem is very often one of excess and many of our midland cut-away peats support molybdenum-toxic pastures. (teagasc.ie)
  • These give rise to problems particularly in young cattle when excess molybdenum in the herbage acts as an antagonist, which militates against efficient copper absorption by the animal. (teagasc.ie)
  • The amount of tellurium in molybdenum ditelluride can vary, with tellurium being slightly deficient unless it is added in excess during production. (wikipedia.org)
  • supplement
  • this was not previously thought to be a problem, but it may be important to supplement molybdenum to maintain uric acid levels in midnormal range for the antioxidant function as well as possible others. (orthomolecular.org)
  • Molybdenum is marketed both as a tablet and as a liquid supplement containing the mineral in dissolved form. (doctors-hospital.net)
  • 2 People with serious kidney disease should also avoid taking molybdenum (or any other supplement) except on the advice of a physician. (doctors-hospital.net)
  • A molybdenum supplement could save you money when compared to some organic foods. (pureformulas.com)
  • structures
  • In both of these structures, each molybdenum atom exists at the center of a trigonal prismatic coordination sphere and is covalently bonded to six sulfide ions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heteropoly-molybdenum blues have structures based on the Keggin structure. (wikipedia.org)