• nausea
  • Dopamine produces nausea and vomiting by stimulation of the medullary chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ), and metoclopramide blocks stimulation of the CTZ by agents like l-dopa or apomorphine which are known to increase dopamine levels or to possess dopamine-like effects. (nih.gov)
  • The injectable form of metoclopramide is most often used for the prevention of nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy. (medbroadcast.com)
  • elderly
  • Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of metoclopramide in the elderly. (drugs.com)
  • effects
  • Metoclopramide inhibits the central and peripheral effects of apomorphine, induces release of prolactin and causes a transient increase in circulating aldosterone levels, which may be associated with transient fluid retention. (nih.gov)
  • Although experience with the effects of metoclopramide on esophageal erosions and ulcerations is limited, healing was documented in a controlled trial using four times daily therapy at 15 mg/dose. (drugs.com)