• centers
  • Kaldjian and his colleagues received survey responses from 538 faculty physicians, resident physicians and medical students from academic medical centers in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions of the United States. (emaxhealth.com)
  • A 2001 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association of seven Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers estimated that for roughly every 10,000 patients admitted to the select hospitals, one patient died who would have lived for three months or more in good cognitive health had "optimal" care been provided. (wikipedia.org)
  • By reviewing and correcting medical content in the manner promoted by Heilman (and with many of his contributions), in Wikipedia articles like that about Ebola, Wikipedia has become a source of information to the general public, thus being regarded among respected sites run by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, covering the topic. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • For their study, the Children s Center researchers first recorded a baseline total of 60 errors (10.8 per 100 TPN orders) from October through November 2000 that required the pharmacist to contact the provider to clarify or correct the order. (innovations-report.com)
  • After the paper-based TPN order system was replaced by the TPN Calculator, they saw just 20 errors from November to December 2000 (4.2 errors per 100 orders). (innovations-report.com)
  • In 2000 alone, the extra medical costs incurred by preventable drug-related injuries approximated $887 million-and the study looked only at injuries sustained by Medicare recipients, a subset of clinic visitors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers looked at studies that analyzed the medical death rate data from 2000 to 2008 and extrapolated that over 250,000 deaths per year had stemmed from a medical error, which translates to 9.5% of all deaths annually in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • He graduated from the University of Saskatchewan in 2000 with a Bachelor of Science in anatomy, and he subsequently earned his medical degree there in 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • This is not to say that forgiveness should be a course in medical school," Kaldjian said," but it does suggest that medical schools should consider ways to encourage trainees to draw upon the deeper personal beliefs they bring to the practice of medicine that may be relevant to the challenges of disclosing medical errors. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Medical malpractice is professional negligence by act or omission by a health care provider in which the treatment provided falls below the accepted standard of practice in the medical community and causes injury or death to the patient, with most cases involving medical error. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, despite an increasing emphasis on the scientific basis of medical practice in Europe and the United States in the late 19th Century, data on adverse outcomes were hard to come by and the various studies commissioned collected mostly anecdotal events. (wikipedia.org)
  • entails
  • Virtual medical treatment also entails potentially decreased human interaction between medical professionals and patients, an increased risk of error when medical services are delivered in the absence of a registered professional, and an increased risk that protected health information may be compromised through electronic storage and transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • disclosure
  • It also shows why they don't get reported and how medical-error disclosure around the world is shifting away from blaming people, to a "no-fault" model that seeks to improve the whole system of care. (aacc.org)
  • negligent
  • Receiving candor and apologies from negligent medical providers, as well as the right to serve on review panels, should not be contingent on the victims giving up rights to pursue a legal action for their physical, emotional and economic losses. (prweb.com)
  • As illustrated in Columbia Medical Center of Las Colinas v Bush, 122 S.W. 3d 835 (Tex. 2003), "following orders" may not protect nurses and other non-physicians from liability when committing negligent acts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Negligent treatment: a medical professional is alleged to have made a mistake that a reasonably competent professional in the same position would not have made. (wikipedia.org)
  • Damage: Without damage (losses which may be pecuniary or emotional), there is no basis for a claim, regardless of whether the medical provider was negligent. (wikipedia.org)
  • focuses
  • But despite a claim in one committee's press release that its bill "fixes" the problem of medical errors, most of the language focuses on research that's already under way. (chron.com)
  • I sit on an advisory board for our state that focuses on medical errors. (medhelp.org)
  • processes
  • Studies in HSR investigate how social factors, health policy, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, medical technology, and personal behaviors affect access to health care, the quality and cost of health care, and quantity and quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgical
  • Cutting off the wrong limb or leaving surgical tools in the body are two forms of surgical errors. (wisegeek.com)
  • One technique is to use a standardized color coding system for medications, surgical tools, and other medical equipment. (wisegeek.com)
  • Congress
  • WASHINGTON -- Health care legislation now before Congress takes only modest steps to address a problem that is far more deadly than inadequate medical insurance -- medical error. (chron.com)
  • Congress does not have a sense of urgency about medical errors, he said, and while access and insurance issues are important, Conway said he believes that patient safety should be embedded in the legislation as an "overarching" goal. (chron.com)
  • health
  • The best thing you can do to prevent medical errors is to be involved in your health care. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The Indiana State Department of Health today released the annual report of the Indiana Medical Error Reporting System (MERS), which includes reported events for calendar year 2008. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The medical error data has been instrumental in increasing awareness of patient safety," said State Health Commissioner Judy Monroe, M.D. "Now that we have identified areas for improvement, the next step is to use this data to focus our efforts on improved quality of care. (emaxhealth.com)
  • 1. The single most important way you can help to prevent errors is to be an active member of your health care team. (medhelp.org)
  • A study by the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences found that 88 percent of medicine errors involved the wrong drug or the wrong dose. (medhelp.org)
  • Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO discussed its report on issues related to adverse medical events in the nation's health care system. (gao.gov)
  • Compared with medical research, HSR is a relatively young science that developed through the bringing together of social science perspectives with the contributions of individuals and institutions engaged in delivering health services. (wikipedia.org)
  • These technologies permit communications between patient and medical staff with both convenience and fidelity, as well as the transmission of medical, imaging and health informatics data from one site to another. (wikipedia.org)
  • eHealth is another related term, used particularly in the U.K. and Europe, as an umbrella term that includes telehealth, electronic medical records, and other components of health information technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System is a report issued in November 1999 by the U.S. Institute of Medicine that may have resulted in increased awareness of U.S. medical errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • 73.98762) The hospital center is a member of the Mount Sinai Health System, a nonprofit hospital system formed by the merger of Continuum Health Partners and the Mount Sinai Medical Center in September 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fatal Care: Survive in the U.S. Health System is a book about preventable medical errors written by Sanjaya Kumar, president and chief medical officer of Quantros, Milpitas, California. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fatal Care: Survive in the U.S. Health System describes the impact of preventable medical errors on thirteen families. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the full magnitude and impact of errors in health care was not appreciated until the 1990s, when several reports brought attention to this issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Logistic regression models were fitted to study the association between number of chronic conditions and medical errors, controlling for patient characteristics, hospital characteristics, disease severity, and length of stay. (aappublications.org)
  • This study demonstrates that it s possible to identify a situation with a potential for errors and use existing infrastructure to develop a practical, technological solution, while leaving aspects of the remaining system intact," Lehmann says. (innovations-report.com)
  • Ten years after a groundbreaking Australian study revealed 18,000 annual deaths from medical errors, Professor Bill Runciman, one of the study's authors and president of the Australian Patient Safety Foundation since its inception in 1989, reported himself a victim of a medical dosing error. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of May 2014, Heilman was working on a study with Samir Grover, of the University of Toronto, which would assign medical students to take a test using either Wikipedia or medical textbooks to determine which is more accurate. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, Heilman and Andrew West published a study which found that the number of Wikipedia editors who focused on editing medical articles decreased by 40 percent from 2008 to 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children s Center have designed an online, Web-based system for ordering total parenteral nutrition (TPN) that identifies and pre-emptively eliminates potentially serious calculation errors. (innovations-report.com)
  • From a survey of faculty physicians, resident physicians and medical students, researchers found that while nearly all respondents indicated that they would disclose a hypothetical error, less than half reported having disclosed an actual minor or major medical error. (emaxhealth.com)
  • harm
  • If he wasn't so (sick etc), this error wouldn't have caused so much harm. (wikipedia.org)
  • If we're not totally and absolutely certain the error caused the harm, we don't have to tell. (wikipedia.org)
  • But the data shows that systems errors are the cause of harm, not individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • victim
  • I was dismayed by the lack of sympathy and wondered secretly if I could have made the same mistake-and, like the hapless resident, become the second victim of the error. (bmj.com)
  • eliminate
  • This book identifies possible intelligent system approaches that can be adopted to help control and eliminate these errors. (aacc.org)
  • The new biometric technology employed by New York University's Langone Medical Center was expected to speed up patient check-ins and eliminate medical errors. (reuters.com)
  • care
  • They would like the medical errors reported by a public agency, have the agency release it and then have it printed in some kind of Consumer Reports, and then they can go somewhere else" for care, he said. (washingtonpost.com)
  • But Carolyn Clancy, director of the federal agency devoted to improving medical care, countered: "Telling a patient about a medical error and what will be done in the future to prevent it should be the rule, not the exception. (washingtonpost.com)
  • TPN Calculator" not only reduced TPN order errors in the Hopkins Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) by nearly 90 percent, but also proved to be faster and easier to use than the standard paper-based order system, the team reports. (innovations-report.com)
  • Remote patient monitoring through mobile technology can reduce the need for outpatient visits and enable remote prescription verification and drug administration oversight, potentially significantly reducing the overall cost of medical care. (wikipedia.org)
  • systems
  • Lubnau, Lubnau, and Okray apply the model to the engineering of firefighting systems, aiming to reduce human errors by "inserting additional layers of cheese into the system", namely the techniques of Crew Resource Management. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resulting patient safety knowledge continually informs improvement efforts such as: applying lessons learned from business and industry, adopting innovative technologies, educating providers and consumers, enhancing error reporting systems, and developing new economic incentives. (wikipedia.org)
  • flaws
  • Such research led to the realization that medical error can be the result of "system flaws, not character flaws", and that greed, ignorance, malice or laziness are not the only causes of error. (wikipedia.org)
  • negligence
  • At the least, they are negligence, if not dereliction, but in medicine they are lumped together under the word error with innocent accidents and treated as such. (wikipedia.org)
  • These efforts are encouraging," Salvi said, "but it is still crucial for victims and their families to seek competent legal counsel if they have been harmed by medical negligence. (prweb.com)
  • The firm's success in medical negligence, personal injury and wrongful death cases features recoveries of more than $600 million on behalf of its clients, including more than 170 multi-million dollar verdicts or settlements. (prweb.com)
  • ethics
  • Our goal was to learn more about clinicians' attitudes but also what they actually have, and have not, done," said the study's lead author Lauris Kaldjian, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and director of the college's Program in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. (emaxhealth.com)
  • infections
  • In August, a national Hearst investigation, ``Dead by Mistake,'' concluded that up to 200,000 people per year die from medical errors and infections in the United States. (chron.com)
  • The strongest initiative, which is in a House bill, would require national reporting of hospital-acquired infections, but not medical errors. (chron.com)
  • organizations
  • In addition, Sutcliffe is an active consultant on matters related to safety organizing and safety culture for a variety of entities, including governmental agencies such the United States Forest Service and Fire Department of New York, non-governmental organizations such as the Mayo Clinic and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and private multinational companies such as General Electric, Hewlett-Packard, and Target. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both organizations were soon expanded as the magnitude of the medical error crisis became known. (wikipedia.org)
  • issues
  • Monitor your parent for any changes in attitude, complaints, etc., and bring those issues up with the medical staff immediately. (visitingangels.com)
  • They bring a unique perspective and can pinpoint issues that might be off the radar screen for many medical professionals. (prweb.com)
  • Human
  • A human error approach to aviation accident analysis: the human factors analysis and classification system. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to studies in the pscychology of human error, a person may inadvertently perform one action while intending to do another. (wikipedia.org)
  • But, the concept of "slips and capture" is studied in the psychology of human error, and efforts to prevent error. (wikipedia.org)