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  • vaccination
  • This really closes the scientific inquiry into whether measles or MMR vaccination causes autism," Schaffner tells WebMD. (webmd.com)
  • before vaccination , so there isn't any any evidence vaccination played any part in deaths decline (they use incidence stats to hide that fact) , while parents are spun the lie that vaccination was the only factor in the decline and therefore the only defence, while Allopathy hypes the dangers of measles . (whale.to)
  • Vaccination is suppressing a beneficial process of the immune system , and leads to measles in younger children where it is more dangerous, while natural therapies and the real causes of measles deaths are ignored. (whale.to)
  • If Allopathy really cared about measles deaths they would have used Vitamin C 50 years ago ( see ) , but that would have spelt the end of vaccination along with most of their other useless, but highly profitable, drugs. (whale.to)
  • My 15-month-old had his measles vaccination when he had a cold, and I'm worried it may not have worked. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Do you know of any research into the effect of colds on the body's response to measles vaccination ? (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • NVIC encourages you to become fully informed about measles and the measles vaccine by reading all sections in the Table of Contents, which contain many links and resources such as the manufacturer product information inserts, and to speak with one or more trusted health care professionals before making a vaccination decision for yourself or your child. (nvic.org)
  • When the first dose is administered to children 12 to 23 months of age as MMRV vaccine, there is a higher risk of fever and febrile seizures in the 7 to 10 days after vaccination when compared to separate administration of MMR and univalent varicella vaccine at the same visit. (canada.ca)
  • Hambidge, an expert in pediatric vaccination with Kaiser Permanente's Institute for Health Research Colorado , is lead author of a new study that examines the association between vaccine timing and seizures. (cnn.com)
  • A number of people have claimed that a young child's immune system is not robust enough to be given multiple vaccines, and that it is safer to 'spread out' vaccination,' Hambidge said. (cnn.com)
  • Because the U.S. is seeing the largest increase in measles cases in recent memory due to unvaccinated travelers returning from trips abroad, the risk of not vaccinating a child for measles or for delaying vaccination is that the child is left vulnerable to catching measles, which is a very serious disease,' Hambidge said. (cnn.com)
  • In the largest study to date on children in a low/middle income country, new research in Ghana finds that the timing of a measles vaccine in an overall vaccination schedule can have a profound impact on child survival rates beyond protecting against measles infection. (eurekalert.org)
  • The findings, published today in open access journal Frontiers in Public Health , suggest that measles vaccination in the recommended sequence may have made an important contribution towards achieving the Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality. (eurekalert.org)
  • In particular, child mortality was shown to be lower when the measles vaccine came after the third diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP3) vaccination, as recommend by the WHO, compared to before DTP or given together with DTP. (eurekalert.org)
  • Using routine vaccination and survival data for more than 38,000 children over a 17 year period in northern Ghana, the researchers assessed mortality differences between children vaccinated against measles after the DTP3 vaccine and those who were not vaccinated against measles. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our new study adds to growing evidence that, when administered in the recommended sequence, measles vaccination helps to reduce child mortality through non-specific effects as well. (eurekalert.org)
  • The authors suggest this improved measles vaccination coverage in the recommended sequence may have contributed towards the Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality. (eurekalert.org)
  • When children in Ghana are not fully vaccinated, it is usually the measles vaccination which is missing," says Dr Welaga. (eurekalert.org)
  • The study also found a significantly stronger beneficial effect of measles vaccination for boys in comparison to girls. (eurekalert.org)
  • The study's authors say the reasons for this are unclear and recommend future studies to examine the sex-differential effect of measles vaccination on all-cause mortality. (eurekalert.org)
  • It may be that measles infection is eliminated in the near future and thus measles vaccination is de-emphasized -- but if the non-specific beneficial effects of measles vaccination are indeed positive then we should consider continued vaccination even if measles is eradicated. (eurekalert.org)
  • Pregnant women should not receive this vaccine, as well as women seeking to become pregnant should avoid become pregnant for 4 weeks subsequent to MMR vaccination. (nvic.org)
  • People who followed the measles outbreak and vaccination debate "not at all closely" (19% of the public) are less likely to say the vaccines are safe. (people-press.org)
  • An outbreak of almost 30,000 cases in 1990 led to a renewed push for vaccination and the addition of a second vaccine to the recommended schedule. (wikipedia.org)
  • The benefit of measles vaccination in preventing illness, disability, and death have been well documented. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first 20 years of licensed measles vaccination in the U.S. prevented an estimated 52 million cases of the disease, 17,400 cases of mental retardation, and 5,200 deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • During 1999-2004, a strategy led by the World Health Organization and UNICEF led to improvements in measles vaccination coverage that averted an estimated 1.4 million measles deaths worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although it was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000, high rates of vaccination and excellent communication with those who refuse vaccination are needed to prevent outbreaks and sustain the elimination of measles in the U.S. Of the 66 cases of measles reported in the U.S. in 2005, slightly over half were attributable to one unvaccinated individual who acquired measles during a visit to Romania. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vaccination has resulted in a 75% decrease in deaths from measles between 2000 and 2013 with about 85% of children globally being currently vaccinated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Differences in female-male mortality after high-titre measles vaccine and association with subsequent vaccination with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis and inactivated poliovirus: reanalysis of West African studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was also a Fellow at Children's Hospital Boston, where he worked with Dr. John Franklin Enders, known as "The Father of Modern Vaccines", who earned the Nobel Prize in 1954 for his research on cultivating the polio virus that led to the development of a vaccination for the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scheibner has been active in the anti-vaccination field researching, writing and giving lectures on vaccines and vaccinations since her retirement from the Department of Mineral Resources, New South Wales, Australia in 1987. (wikipedia.org)
  • Worldwide, the fatality rate has been significantly reduced by a vaccination campaign led by partners in the Measles Initiative: the American Red Cross, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United Nations Foundation, UNICEF and the WHO. (wikipedia.org)
  • doses
  • About 3 percent of people who receive two doses of the measles vaccine will get measles if they come in contact with someone who has the virus, according to the CDC. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Yes, a child is protected between the first and second doses of the measles vaccine, but this protection is not 100 percent, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease specialist and a senior associate at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Center for Health Security. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The CDC recommends that children get two doses of the MMR vaccine with the first dose given between ages 12-15 months, and the second dose given between ages 4-6 years. (nvic.org)
  • Healthcare workers and students entering college or other post-high school educational institutions, as well as international travelers, are told to get two doses of measles vaccine if they have not been vaccinated previously. (nvic.org)
  • This risk is estimated at about 1 additional febrile seizure for every 2,300 to 2,800 doses of MMRV vaccine. (canada.ca)
  • 2 doses of any measles-containing (MMR or MMRV) vaccine. (canada.ca)
  • 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine. (canada.ca)
  • Those who are at the greatest risk of measles exposure (travellers to destinations outside of North America, health care workers, students in post-secondary educational settings, and military personnel) should receive 2 doses of MMR vaccine. (canada.ca)
  • 2 doses of MMR vaccine. (canada.ca)
  • The overall risk of seizures in vaccines that contain measles is 'real but very low,' Hambidge said - it's about 1 in 4,000 doses, according to previous research. (cnn.com)
  • It appears that the risk of seizures is about 2 in every 4,000 doses for children who receive the first MMR vaccine between 16 and 23 months of age. (cnn.com)
  • Children and adults who are traveling to Russia for the World Cup -- which takes place between June 14 and July 15 -- should therefore make sure that they have received two doses of the measles vaccine, he said. (kmov.com)
  • The vaccine is typically given in two doses in early childhood. (kmov.com)
  • We actually have a fairly substantial proportion of people who are adults who do not have a history of measles as a child and may have missed getting two doses of the vaccine because that recommendation is relatively recent,' Griffin said. (kmov.com)
  • One dose of the vaccine is about 93% effective at preventing measles if the person is exposed to the virus, while two doses are about 97% effective, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (kmov.com)
  • In general, persons receiving large daily doses of corticosteroids for 14 days or more should not get MMR vaccine. (nvic.org)
  • In a study he performed on the tetanus vaccine, he found that people were getting as much as 2,500 times the amount needed to provide protection, showing that the booster doses could be given once every ten years, rather than yearly, while substantially reducing the risk of allergic reactions caused by the higher dosages in common use. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose
  • That's why the first dose of the MMR vaccine is typically given when a baby is 12 to 15 months old, Schaffner said. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • 10 CDC recommendations state that persons age 18 or older, who were born in 1957 or later, should get at least one dose of MMR if there is no laboratory evidence of naturally acquired measles immunity or documentation that a measles vaccine was given on or after the first birthday. (nvic.org)
  • The first dose of measles-containing vaccine should be administered at 12 to 15 months of age and the second dose at 18 months of age or any time thereafter, but no later than around school entry. (canada.ca)
  • 1 dose of MMR vaccine. (canada.ca)
  • 1 dose of MMR vaccine should be considered. (canada.ca)
  • U.S. health authorities recommend that children receive their first dose of the MMR or MMRV vaccine at 12 to 15 months of age. (cnn.com)
  • Also, delaying MMR vaccine may be called for if a previous episode of thrombocytopenia occurred within 6 weeks after the previous dose of vaccine. (nvic.org)
  • autism
  • Sept. 3, 2008 -- Can the measles vaccine cause autism ? (webmd.com)
  • The idea was that the measles virus from the live-virus measles vaccine lurks in the gut of some young children, causing bowel disease and making them more susceptible to environmental factors that might cause autism . (webmd.com)
  • Now a painstaking, six-year study of children with bowel disease -- 25 with autism and 13 with normal development -- shows no link between getting the MMR (measles- mumps - rubella ) vaccine and either autism or bowel disease. (webmd.com)
  • Lipkin was quick to add that the current study focuses only on theories that the MMR vaccine causes autism. (webmd.com)
  • It does not address other vaccine -autism theories, such as the fear that the mercury-containing preservative thimerosal might cause autism . (webmd.com)
  • That earlier 1998 study by U.K. researcher Andrew Wakefield and colleagues first put forward the theory that measles viruses lurking in the gut might cause autism . (webmd.com)
  • A 2002 study purportedly found measles-vaccine virus in the intestines of kids with autism and bowel disease -- but not in developmentally normal kids. (webmd.com)
  • Moreover, only five of the 25 kids with autism got their MMR vaccine before getting bowel disease and autism. (webmd.com)
  • But Bernard says the Lipkin study does not close the book on the theory that MMR vaccine might trigger autism. (webmd.com)
  • New research further debunks any link between the measles vaccine and autism, a finding that comes as the nation is experiencing a surge in measles cases fueled by children left unvaccinated. (latimes.com)
  • Years of research with the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, better known as MMR, have found that it doesn't cause autism. (latimes.com)
  • Instead they persecute their heretics/whistleblowers such as Dr Wakefield , Lisa Blakemore-Brown & Dr Jane Donegan (in a nasty attempt to suppress the truth on MMR and vaccine autism), & Dr Waney Squier , ( Shaken Baby Syndrome ), as well as taking away legal funding for the victims. (whale.to)
  • Verify: Can the measles vaccine cause autism? (9news.com)
  • Many parents who refuse the MMR vaccine cite fears about a possible connection with autism, a position that continues to spread online and within the Somali-American community in Minneapolis, which has seen the vast majority of cases. (9news.com)
  • The Minnesota Department of Health, The National Institutes of Health, the Center for Disease Control and the World Health Organization represent just a few of the many groups that have all concluded there is NO link between autism and vaccines. (9news.com)
  • There are well over 100 studies that have shown there is no link between vaccines and autism, and they've looked at every possible side of that issue, and they've found nothing time and time again. (9news.com)
  • You can read an updated list of those studies here , courtesy of the American Academy of Pediatrics, which also asserts that there is no connection between the vaccine and autism. (9news.com)
  • This is well before children are receiving a lot of their vaccines so autism develops slowly over time, probably starts in utero. (9news.com)
  • Notably, very few respondents specifically raise concerns about vaccines causing autism or other disorders. (people-press.org)
  • In 2008, she published a study concluding that there was no association between presence of measles vaccine virus in the gut of children and whether these children had autism, nor was there an association between MMR exposure and autism. (wikipedia.org)
  • MMRV
  • MMRV vaccine may be used in healthy children aged 12 months to less than 13 years. (canada.ca)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tells parents that while MMRV results in one fewer vaccine, it is associated with a higher risk of seizures. (cnn.com)
  • The association with seizures was strongest for children who received the MMRV vaccine between 16 and 18 months of age. (cnn.com)
  • 1954
  • During a 1954 measles outbreak in Boston, Massachusetts, Enders and Peebles collected blood samples from ill students. (reference.com)
  • Upon the 1954 polio vaccine field trial, whose success Salk announced on the radio, Salk became a public hero but failed to credit the many other researchers that his effort rode upon, and was somewhat shunned by America's scientific establishment. (wikipedia.org)
  • deaths
  • MMR vaccine is obviously killing more kids now than measles would be doing , with or without the va ccine ( see ) , as FOIA shows in 1990 , in the UK , there were approximately 70 deaths associated with triple vaccines (DTP and MMR) , the UK Gov' has paid out for MMR deaths, and one media report mentioned 26 deaths . (whale.to)
  • There have been no measles-related deaths reported there this year, according to Butler. (kmov.com)
  • Because case reports have linked measles vaccine to deaths in severely immunocompromised individuals, these persons should not be given MMR either. (nvic.org)
  • While preventing many deaths and serious illnesses, the vaccine does cause side effects in a small percentage of recipients, ranging from rashes to, rarely, convulsions. (wikipedia.org)
  • No other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2011, the WHO estimated that there were about 158,000 deaths caused by measles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Globally, measles fell 60% from an estimated 873,000 deaths in 1999 to 345,000 in 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estimates for 2008 indicate deaths fell further to 164,000 globally, with 77% of the remaining measles deaths in 2008 occurring within the Southeast Asian region. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of May 2011, over 17,000 cases of measles have so far been reported from France between January 2008 and April 2011, including 2 deaths in 2010 and 6 deaths in 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • contagious
  • but also, it's a good proxy indicator for failures in health care delivery, because measles is incredibly contagious, and it really does expose any weakness in health systems,' Butler said. (kmov.com)
  • Measles is extremely contagious and its continued circulation in a community depends on the generation of susceptible hosts by birth of children. (wikipedia.org)
  • virus
  • The new study, repeating tests in multiple laboratories and using state-of-the-art technology, found slight traces of measles-vaccine virus in only two kids. (webmd.com)
  • If babies were given the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) shot during this period, the vaccine wouldn't do a good job of stimulating the immune system to fight the virus. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Measles vaccine is a weakened (attenuated) form of the live measles virus. (nvic.org)
  • It is a live attenuated virus vaccine propagated in chick embryo cells and cultured with Jeryl Lynn live attenuated virus mumps and Meruvax II, a live attenuated virus vaccine propagated in WI-38 human diploid lung fibroblasts. (nvic.org)
  • They successfully isolated the measles virus in the blood of 13-year-old David Edmonston for use in creating a vaccine, explains the CDC. (reference.com)
  • In 1968, Maurice Hilleman and colleagues developed a new, better vaccine with an even weaker strain of the virus, called the Moraten or Edmonston-Enders strain. (reference.com)
  • Measles (rubeola, red measles) is caused by measles virus, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family. (canada.ca)
  • For additional information about the measles virus, refer to the Pathogen Safety Data Sheet . (canada.ca)
  • That early period of measles where you have an infectious virus but might be showing very minimal signs of disease is a very bad one for getting out and about. (cbc.ca)
  • Measles is the most highly infectious virus that we know of and can be transmitted fairly readily to susceptible individuals,' Schaffner said. (kmov.com)
  • The measles virus can hover in the air and be infectious for hours afterward. (kmov.com)
  • While the vaccine is made with a live virus which can cause side effects, these are far fewer and less serious than the sickness and death caused by measles itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her most significant contribution to the research was her research on human amnion cells with Dr. Milan V. Milovanovic and how they supported the growth of the measles virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this research, the team was able to propagate the measles virus throughout 28 serial passages in human amnion cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the 28th passage in human amnion cells, the measles virus was then inoculated into chick embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1959, Mitus was the lead author of an article entitled "Persistence of Measles Virus and Depression of Antibody Formation in Patients with Giant-Cell Pneumonia after Measles" published in The New England Journal of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main conclusion from this paper was that in a proportion of giant-cell pneumonia cases, the measles virus was found to be an etiologic agent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overall, Mitus published at least 9 peer-reviewed journal articles on measles and the measles virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thomas Chalmers Peebles (June 5, 1921 - July 8, 2010) was an American physician who made multiple discoveries in the field of medicine, including being the first to isolate the measles virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Switching to study measles, Peebles was sent to a Fay School where an outbreak of the disease was underway and was able to isolate the virus from some of the blood samples and throat swabs he took from students. (wikipedia.org)
  • He remained with Enders for 12 years during which time they developed the attenuated measles virus vaccine now used throughout the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • tetanus
  • Peebles also did research that led to the development of fluoridated vitamins and did research that showed that tetanus vaccine could be given once every 10 years, rather than annually as had been the widespread practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Merck
  • however, Merck has discontinued production of this vaccine, so new batches of it will not be available, even though it's approved. (nvic.org)
  • According to Merck, both MMRII and ProQuad vaccines are screened for adventitious agents. (nvic.org)
  • viruses
  • Causes of breakthrough infections include improper administration or storage of vaccines, mutations in viruses and antibody blocking. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • Last year's 644 cases were the greatest number of cases since measles was eradicated from the U.S. in 2000, according to the CDC. (people-press.org)
  • Five out of six WHO regions have set goals to eliminate measles, and at the 63rd World Health Assembly in May 2010, delegates agreed a global target of a 95% reduction in measles mortality by 2015 from the level seen in 2000, as well as to move towards eventual eradication. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccinations
  • One - that giving vaccinations too close together is unhealthy - has prompted some parents to request that their children receive vaccines on an alternate schedule, Hambidge told CNN in an e-mail. (cnn.com)
  • Those who paid at least some attention to news about measles and vaccinations were more likely to say vaccines for MMR are safe for healthy children. (people-press.org)
  • mortality
  • Measles unvaccinated boys had a 69% higher risk of dying during one year of follow-up and a 43% higher mortality rate when followed until 5 years of age. (eurekalert.org)
  • One of the most important findings was that a new measles vaccine used in low-income countries was associated with a two-fold increase in mortality among girls. (wikipedia.org)
  • Measles is a leading cause of vaccine-preventable childhood mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • children
  • Still, some parents' fears persist, in part due to a 1998 British study that linked the vaccine with a subgroup of autistic children who also had serious gastrointestinal problems. (latimes.com)
  • But in practice, the vaccine protected only 92 to 93 percent of children. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Are children protected against measles in the years between their first and second MMR shot? (huffingtonpost.com)
  • According to the Minnesota Department of Health, 45 of the 48 measles cases thus far involve children who have not been vaccinated against it. (9news.com)
  • The study suggests that children who receive childhood vaccines in the first year of life do not have an associated risk of seizure. (cnn.com)
  • Febrile seizures that occur after MMR vaccine are rare and temporary - these children are not at increased risk of epilepsy,' Hambidge said. (cnn.com)
  • The researchers found that compared to measles-unvaccinated children, survival rates for measles-vaccinated children increased by a staggering 28% in the first 12 months of follow-up and 18% by five years of age. (eurekalert.org)
  • This effect was still present when children who had died from measles were excluded from the analysis -- indicating that the measles vaccine has beneficial effects beyond direct prevention of measles. (eurekalert.org)
  • The proportion of children in Ghana who received the measles vaccine after DTP3 increased from 45% in 1996 to 95% in 2012. (eurekalert.org)
  • Policy makers should ensure that children get vaccinated for measles after DTP3 because of the potential survival benefits. (eurekalert.org)
  • The new national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted Feb. 5-8 among 1,003 adults, finds Republicans (89%) and Democrats (87%) generally agree that such vaccines are safe for children who are healthy. (people-press.org)
  • Roughly nine-in-ten college graduates (92%) see vaccines for MMR as safe for healthy children. (people-press.org)
  • Eight-in-ten adults (80%) who are a parent or guardian of a child under 18 say the vaccines are safe for healthy children. (people-press.org)
  • Among those who are not parents of children under 18, 85% say the vaccines are safe. (people-press.org)
  • A similar share of women (85%) and men (81%) say vaccines for MMR are safe for healthy children. (people-press.org)
  • Among the 80% of the public who followed the story "very," "fairly," or "not too closely," 87% say vaccines for MMR are safe for healthy children, 8% say they are unsafe and 5% don't know. (people-press.org)
  • Some are skeptical about the effectiveness of vaccines, while others question why healthy children should be given the vaccines. (people-press.org)
  • About 85% of children globally have received this vaccine as of 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first version of the lab's vaccine on mentally retarded and disabled children at a school outside of Boston. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • Most of the cases of measles reported so far in 2015 are part of a large, ongoing outbreak linked to Disneyland in Anaheim, California, according to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In 2014, there were more than 600 cases of measles in the U.S. The largest outbreak of the disease involved 383 of these cases, and occurred primarily among unvaccinated people living in Amish communities in Ohio. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Many of the U.S. cases in 2014 could be traced back to a large measles outbreak in the Philippines, the agency said. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Incidentally, over 50% of measles cases have been vaccinated ( see ). (whale.to)
  • Complications of measles disease occur in about 10% of measles cases. (canada.ca)
  • The risk of catching measles disease is far more serious, especially as we are seeing increased cases of measles in the U.S. (cnn.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 102 cases of measles in 14 states in the first 30 days of the new year, most of which were linked to an outbreak at Disneyland in California. (people-press.org)
  • Death from measles was reported in approximately 0.2% of the cases in the United States from 1985 through 1992. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Vietnam, in the measles epidemic in the beginning of 2014, as of April 19 there were 8,500 measles cases and 114 fatalities, and as of May 30 there were 21,639 measles cases and 142 fatalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • On February 19, 2009, 505 measles cases were reported in twelve provinces in northern Vietnam, with Hanoi accounting for 160 cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beginning in September 2009, Johannesburg, South Africa reported about 48 cases of measles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Complications
  • Complications with measles are relatively common, ranging from mild complications such as diarrhea to serious complications such as pneumonia (either direct viral pneumonia or secondary bacterial pneumonia), bronchitis (either direct viral bronchitis or secondary bacterial bronchitis), otitis media, acute brain inflammation (and very rarely SSPE-subacute sclerosing panencephalitis), and corneal ulceration (leading to corneal scarring). (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk factors for severe measles and its complications include malnutrition, underlying immunodeficiency, pregnancy, and vitamin A deficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • A high rate of complications, including meningitis and encephalitis, has worried health workers, and the U.S. CDC recommended all travelers be immunized against measles. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1957
  • This concept was first recognized in measles by Bartlett in 1957, who referred to the minimum number supporting measles as the critical community size (CCS). (wikipedia.org)
  • NVIC
  • Help educate families about preventing vaccine injury and death by donating to NVIC today. (nvic.org)
  • travelers
  • The theme park has many international visitors, and measles is brought into the United States every year by unvaccinated travelers who contract the disease in other countries, especially in Western Europe, Pakistan, Vietnam and the Philippines, according to the CDPH. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • immune
  • The recommendations for the indications, dosage and administration of Measles Immune globulin (Ig) post-exposure prophylaxis have recently been revised by NACI. (canada.ca)
  • The National Institutes of Health has also stated persons with weakened immune systems due to certain cancers, HIV, chemotherapy, radiation therapy or other drugs that suppress the immune system should not get this vaccine. (nvic.org)
  • Susceptible
  • Measles-containing vaccine is recommended for susceptible adults born in or after 1970. (canada.ca)
  • however, susceptible health care workers, travellers to destinations outside of North America, and military personnel should receive MMR vaccine, regardless of year of birth. (canada.ca)
  • H1N1
  • Among them, his 2009 appearance on Fox News in regards to the H1N1 vaccine, in which Holtorf plainly states he "definitely would not" administer the controversial vaccine to his own children, is one of the most highly deliberated. (wikipedia.org)
  • smallpox
  • During this period, he and his unit developed a proposal for a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) program to eliminate smallpox and control measles during a 5-year period in 18 contiguous countries in western and central Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • autism
  • Scientific consensus is that no evidence links the vaccine to the development of autism, and that the vaccine's benefits greatly outweigh its risks. (blogspot.com)
  • After the publication of the paper, other researchers were unable to reproduce Wakefield's findings or confirm his hypothesis of an association between the MMR vaccine and autism, or autism and gastrointestinal disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Holtorf has also taken an unpopular stance that children are over vaccinated and that vaccines may be associated with autism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Holtorf likewise links high levels of vaccine adjuncts, such as mercury, to some cases of autism development in children during the interview and is questionably identified on the program as an infectious disease expert. (wikipedia.org)
  • This view is contrary to the position statements of agencies such as the Center for Disease Control and the Institute of Medicine, and societies such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, who state that there is no credible evidence that vaccines have any link to autism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The results of this research is clear: Vaccines do not cause autism. (wikipedia.org)
  • conjugate
  • The meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (MenCCV), to be administered at age 12 months, was introduced and funded for all children in January 2003, with a catch-up program for those aged up to 19 years. (health.gov.au)
  • Ebola
  • CIDRAP News) - Twelve of the 30 recent cases of a disease thought to be Ebola hemorrhagic fever in Sudan have been reclassified as measles, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced today. (umn.edu)
  • She is the current Chair of the WHO SAGE Working Group on Ebola Vaccines, the TFI Working group on Ebola and she chaired the WHO 'High Level Meeting' on Ebola vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose
  • The three-dose primary course of 7vPCV, administered at 2, 4 and 6 months of age, has been recommended and funded for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children since June 2001 (in contrast to this vaccine being recommended for universal use for all Australian infants in September 2003 and funded since January 2005). (health.gov.au)
  • This vaccine is given as a series of shots, the first dose is given at birth, the second between 1 and 2 months, and the third, and possibly fourth, between 6 and 18 months. (wikipedia.org)
  • This vaccine is a 2 or 3 dose series, depending on the brand of the vaccine, that is given at 2 and 4 months in the 2 dose series and at 2,4 and 6 months in the 3 dose series. (wikipedia.org)
  • If this were to happen, it would occur within a week after the first dose or second dose of the vaccine is given. (wikipedia.org)
  • immunological
  • In fact, the 27 veterinary schools in North America are in various stages of examining current popular vaccination protocols and weighing them against accepted immunological theory, the diverse (and competing) vaccine manufacturers' recommendations, the recommendations of research experts, the legal and liability ramifications, public acceptance, and government regulations at local, state/provincial, national, and international levels. (sleddogcentral.com)
  • prevention
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria, including those most likely to cause serious disease. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • She is a board member of AVAC (a global HIV Prevention research advocacy organization) and serves on the US National Institute of Health's Scientific Advisory Committee for the HIV Prevention Network, the Population Council's Microbicide Advisory Committee, the WHO/UNAIDS Steering Committee on Pre-exposure prophylaxis, and the Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology Immunogen Discovery (CHAVI-ID) Scientific Advisory Board. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vaccine has non specific effects such as preventing respiratory infections that may be greater than those of measles prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • For Hib vaccine, the previous recommendation of Hib PRP-OMP (purified polysaccharide conjugated to the outer membrane protein of the bacteria N. meningitidis ) vaccine for all infants was changed to include other Hib vaccines for Indigenous infants in the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales, Tasmania and Victoria, and all non-Indigenous infants. (health.gov.au)
  • virus
  • Subsequent research failed to confirm this hypothesis, with a group of experts in Britain reviewing a number of peer-reviewed studies in 1998 and concluding that the measles virus did not cause Crohn's disease, and that the MMR vaccine did not either. (wikipedia.org)
  • lived in the Charles Maynard House Thomas C. Peebles, physician, responsible for first isolating the measles virus, setting the stage for the development of a vaccine Judy Smith, nurse who disappeared from Philadelphia in 1997 to be found murdered in North Carolina five months later. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2016 a DNA vaccine for the Zika virus began testing at the National Institutes of Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • A veterinary DNA vaccine to protect horses from West Nile virus has been approved. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the vaccine is made with a live virus which can cause side effects, these are far fewer and less serious than the sickness and death caused by measles itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to the introduction of the vaccine in 2006, almost all children in the United States became infected with the virus before their 5th birthday. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • and that 2) the actual vaccination protocol should be left up to the individual veterinary practitioner in consultation with the pet owner, taking into account the specific pet, its environment and husbandry, and risk of infection, played out against the practitioner's understanding of the disease, the vaccine, the local community, and the practitioner's years of experience and education. (sleddogcentral.com)
  • and two years later he published a paper in The Lancet proposing a link between the measles vaccine and Crohn's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vaccine for measles has led to the near-complete elimination of the disease in the United States and other developed countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies show that this vaccine is 85-98% effective against severe rotavirus disease and is 74-87% effective against rotavirus disease of any severity in the first year after the vaccination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coverage
  • Tseng adds, "Ideally, when a new vaccine is introduced to the public, one should consider giving it at the same time as other vaccines to increase coverage levels and minimize administration costs, if there are no immune response issues or safety concerns. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • One gentleman I worked with became convinced due to the news coverage that his adult daughter's seizures were related to the vaccine. (wordpress.com)
  • proteins
  • Future possibilities are for vaccines against HPV L2 proteins, which contain cryptic cross-neutralisation epitopes. (ashm.info)
  • immune response
  • A revision to the zoster vaccine package insert, approved in 2009, stated that the zoster vaccine and the pneumococcal vaccine should not be given together because such concurrent use reduced the ability of the zoster vaccine to generate an immune response. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Our study found no evidence that receiving the zoster vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine on the same day would compromise the immune response necessary to protect against herpes zoster, also known as shingles," notes study lead author Hung Fu Tseng, PhD, MPH, a research scientist with the Kaiser Permanente Department of Research & Evaluation in Pasadena, Calif. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • DNA vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines, including the ability to induce a wider range of immune response types. (wikipedia.org)
  • DNA vaccines elicit the best immune response when highly active expression vectors are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • risks
  • During the past three years, the risks of the pertussis vaccine have received wide publicity, including three nationally broadcast television shows devoted to the subject. (wordpress.com)
  • Second generation vaccines were developed to reduce the risks from live vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children
  • Nine of those children had not yet received any vaccine. (wordpress.com)
  • As funds have been cut during the past five years, it has become increasingly difficult for poorer children to gain access to vaccines. (wordpress.com)
  • About 85% of children globally have received this vaccine as of 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some side effects of this vaccination include: soreness at injection site (1 in 4 children) fever of 99.9 degrees Fahrenheit or higher (1 in 15 children) brief fainting spell Since 1982, when the vaccine became available, more than 100 million people have received the vaccine in the United States and no serious side effects have been reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • California
  • The study was conducted from Jan. 1, 2007 to June 30, 2010, starting from the date of receipt of the zoster vaccine for two groups of Kaiser Permanente Southern California members, 60 years of age and older. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • protective
  • Administering both the pneumococcal and the herpes zoster vaccines to patients during the same visit is beneficial and does not appear to compromise the protective effect of the zoster vaccine, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Vaccine. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • infants
  • Side effects of the vaccine include both mild and more severe symptoms mild: Irritability Mild, temporary diarrhea or vomiting severe: intussusception This is a type of bowel blockage that is treated in a hospital and may require surgery 1 in 20,000 to 1 in 100,000 infants may develop intussusception. (wikipedia.org)
  • live
  • Claims made in Darkness in El Dorado included the following: Napoleon Chagnon and James Neel directly and indirectly caused a genocide in the region through the introduction of a live measles vaccine that was insufficiently attenuated. (wikipedia.org)
  • First generation vaccines are whole-organism vaccines - either live and weakened, or killed forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a vaccine based on a live but weakened strain of measles. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Included in the study were two groups or cohorts: 7,187 people who received both vaccines at the same time and 7,179 people who received the two vaccines at different times (nonconcurrently). (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Separately, Inovio Pharmaceuticals and GeneOne Life Science began tests of a different DNA vaccine against Zika in Miami. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • This new information is important to patients who find it more convenient and less costly to receive both vaccines from their health care providers during the same visit. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • risk
  • For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have at least one risk factor for which the vaccine is recommended, as per The Australian Immunisation Handbook, 9th edition. (health.gov.au)
  • people
  • In 2000, Tierney published Darkness in El Dorado, which accused geneticist James Neel and anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon of exacerbating a measles epidemic among the Yanomamo people, among other damning allegations. (wikipedia.org)
  • administration
  • Administration of two vaccine doses has just been licensed in Europe for the bivalent (Cervarix) vaccine and approval is expected soon for the quadrivalent Gardasil. (ashm.info)
  • Examples of possibilities are simplified administration regimens (e.g. add HPV 16 L1 to measles vaccine) or broader protection against more serotypes. (ashm.info)
  • years
  • You are going to see a slow metamorphosis of vaccine rules and regulations at the various sled dog races over the next few years. (sleddogcentral.com)
  • But due to the issues brought up in the previous years about the pertussis part of the vaccine, his doctor recommended that he only receive the DT vaccine. (wordpress.com)