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  • ADPKD
  • ADPKD is estimated to affect at least 1 in every 1000 individuals worldwide, making this disease the most common inherited kidney disorder with a diagnosed prevalence of 1:2000 and incidence of 1:3000-1:8000 in a global scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trail-blazing studies led by Mayo Clinic professionals established that the total kidney volume (TKV) in a large cohort of ADPKD patients was 1060 ± 642ml with a mean increase of 204ml over three years, or 5.27% per year in the natural course of the disease, among other important, novel findings that were extensively studied for the first time. (wikipedia.org)
  • ADPKD is an autosomal dominant disease, it contains 3 types of mutation: PKD1 (16 Chr), PKD2 (4 Chr) PKD3 (11 Chr, this gene). (wikipedia.org)
  • NIDDK
  • This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. (nih.gov)
  • The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. (nih.gov)
  • In addition, NIDDK received congressional authorization for the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse . (nih.gov)
  • The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is part of the United States National Institutes of Health, which in turn is part of the Department of Health and Human Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The institute that would become NIDDK was established in 1947 as the Experimental Biology and Medicine Institute, subsequently incorporated in 1950 by President Harry S Truman into the National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The NIDDK Office of the Director also administrates two notable programs: the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination, established to investigate disparities in health outcomes for minority groups, and the Office of Obesity Research, which organizes research into obesity and metabolic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • excrete
  • Hyperkalemia usually does not develop until the glomerular filtration rate falls to less than 20-25 ml/min/1.73 m2, at which point the kidneys have decreased ability to excrete potassium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beginning in CKD stage 3, the ability of the kidneys to appropriately excrete a phosphate load is diminished, leading to hyperphosphatemia, elevated PTH (secondary hyperparathyroidism), and decreased 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D with associated elevations in the levels of FGF-23. (wikipedia.org)
  • ultrasound
  • A kidney ultrasound is usually normal, and even a kidney biopsy may not point to a cause for this condition. (rarediseases.org)
  • To try to see what is going on, the doctor might take pictures of the kidneys with X-rays, ultrasound scans, CT scans, or MRI scans. (kidshealth.org)
  • Further tests such as an ultrasound or kidney biopsy may be done to determine the underlying cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • diabetes
  • If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, working with your doctor to keep your blood sugar and blood pressure under control is the best way to prevent kidney disease. (kidneyfund.org)
  • Living a healthy lifestyle can help prevent diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease, or help keep them under control. (kidneyfund.org)
  • Diseases of the kidney are common in people with diabetes. (diabetes.ca)
  • How does diabetes affect the kidneys? (diabetes.ca)
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease in Canada. (diabetes.ca)
  • Diabetes can also affect kidneys by damaging the nerves that tell you when your bladder is full. (diabetes.ca)
  • These tests for your kidneys are usually checked when you are first diagnosed with diabetes, and then once per year after that. (diabetes.ca)
  • The name of the institute was changed in 1972 to National Institute of Arthritis, Metabolism, and Digestive Diseases, again in 1981 to National Institute of Arthritis, Diabetes, and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and to its present name in 1986 following the creation of a separate National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). (wikipedia.org)
  • October 1976-The Arthritis, Diabetes, and Digestive Diseases Amendments of 1976 (P.L. 94-562) established the National Diabetes Advisory Board, charged with advising Congress and the Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) Secretary on implementing the Long-Range Plan to Combat Diabetes developed by the National Commission on Diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • organs
  • Besides taking out your body's "trash," your kidneys help balance your body's water, salt, and mineral levels so your other organs and bones can do their best work. (kidshealth.org)
  • These bean-shaped organs (as in kidney beans, not green beans) are on both sides in the middle of your back just below your ribcage. (kidshealth.org)
  • With about 200 quarts (189 liters) of blood pumping from your heart through the kidneys every day, they do a big job for such small organs. (kidshealth.org)
  • The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs located just below the ribs, near the back. (diabetes.ca)
  • it is characterized by the development of fluid-filled cyst formation and expansion of the kidney and other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disorders
  • Risk factors for HN include poorly controlled moderate to high blood pressure, older age, other kidney disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is an autosomal dominant disease, and it is the most common hereditary disorders with a rate of occurrence of approximately 1 in 1000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous cohort studies have shown associations between disorders of mineral metabolism and fractures, cardiovascular disease, and mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • These observational studies have broadened the focus of CKD-related mineral and bone disorders (MBDs) to include cardiovascular disease (which is the leading cause of death in patients at all stages of CKD). (wikipedia.org)
  • The act authorized the creation of a national commission, centers for research and training in arthritis and rheumatic diseases, a data bank, and an overall plan to investigate the epidemiology, etiology, control, and prevention of these disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • A person with recurrent kidney stones may be screened for such disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • biopsy
  • when i was diagnosed in 1995 (then 13 yrs old) they did a biopsy and found me in late stage 3 very close to stage 4, but my pediactric nephrologist was very agressive with my disease and he was able to keep me from ESRD. (healingwell.com)
  • Healthy
  • Healthy kidneys take the waste out of your blood. (kidneyfund.org)
  • Most people have two kidneys, but they work so effectively that a person can be happy and healthy with only one. (kidshealth.org)
  • In this operation, doctors replace a kidney that doesn't work with a healthy kidney donated by another person. (kidshealth.org)
  • When you need food and nutrition information based on fact or need to know how a healthy diet improves health and fights disease-rely on qualified professionals in the field. (eatright.org)
  • Abnormalities which only affect one kidney are unlikely to cause a problem with the healthy arrival of a baby. (wikipedia.org)
  • the other kidney is usually healthy. (wikipedia.org)
  • body's
  • Sometimes unhealthy kidneys have problems producing a hormone that helps make red blood cells, the cells that carry oxygen to your body's tissues. (kidshealth.org)
  • The kidneys are like the body's garbage collection and disposal system. (kidshealth.org)
  • Think of your kidneys as your body's filtering system. (kidshealth.org)
  • The kidneys also help to regulate your blood pressure, red blood cell production, and your body's calcium and other mineral levels. (kidshealth.org)
  • Nephritis may be caused by an infection, taking certain drugs or toxic chemicals, or by a reaction by the body's immune system that has damaged the kidneys. (kidshealth.org)
  • complications
  • Some of the common complications of CKD include anemia, bone disease, heart disease, high potassium, high calcium and fluid buildup. (kidneyfund.org)
  • The specific aims are to generate new animal models to study the pathogenesis and treatment of human kidney diseases and their cardiovascular complications, accelerate the clinical application of discoveries made in renal basic science laboratories, and provide investigators with specialized tools and expertise to study kidney development, physiology, and pathophysiology. (nih.gov)
  • diagnosis
  • Our goal is to develop improved diagnosis, prevention strategies and treatments for people with kidney diseases. (nih.gov)
  • I've recently been diagnosis with Kidney disease stage 2 and 3. (healingwell.com)
  • 7 of the families had a diagnosis of PKD, while the other 2 families had a diagnosis of polycystic liver disease (PCLD). (wikipedia.org)
  • The absence of a generally accepted definition and diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy prompted Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)] to sponsor a controversies conference, entitled Definition, Evaluation, and Classification of Renal Osteodystrophy, in 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • conduct researches relating to the cause, prevention, and methods of diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and rheumatism and other metabolic diseases, to assist and foster such researches and other activities by public and private agencies, and promote the coordination of all such researches, and to provide training in matters relating to such disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevalence
  • Iron deficiency anemia, which increases in prevalence as kidney function decreases, is especially prevalent in those requiring haemodialysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This mutation alters the genetic sequence in the MUC1 gene, resulting in a new, mutated protein, furthermore, The disease is extremely rare and its prevalence is unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute Kidney
  • The UAB-UCSD O'Brien Center Pilot and Feasibility (PAF) Grants program provides seed funds for new, outstanding, and innovative research proposals related to Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). (nih.gov)
  • Acute kidney injury (sometimes called acute kidney failure) may be due to bacterial infection, injury, shock, heart failure, poisoning, or drug overdose. (kidshealth.org)
  • function
  • Patients may first be diagnosed with this disease when they are found to have an elevated blood creatinine level (measure of kidney function) on a routine blood test at their doctor's office. (rarediseases.org)
  • But sometimes the kidneys don't develop properly and, as a result, don't function as they should. (kidshealth.org)
  • Chronic kidney failure involves a deterioration of kidney function over time. (kidshealth.org)
  • The goal of treatment usually is to slow the decline of kidney function with medication, blood pressure control, and diet. (kidshealth.org)
  • Fortunately, the unaffected kidney takes over and most people with MKD will have normal kidney function. (kidshealth.org)
  • Whether kidney function is lost suddenly or slowly represents an important health challenge. (nih.gov)
  • Another test used to check your kidney function is the estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR). (diabetes.ca)
  • My kidneys function totally normally and I still take a low dose to make sure they continue to function properly. (healingwell.com)
  • In precise usage, disease denotes the structural and causal disease entity[clarification needed] whereas failure denotes the impaired kidney function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Higher dietary intake of animal protein, animal fat, and cholesterol may increase risk for microalbuminuria, a sign of kidney function decline, and generally, diets higher in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains but lower in meat and sweets may be protective against kidney function decline. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another possible cause of Kidney disease is due to decreased function of xanthine oxidase in the purine degradation pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • or an incidental finding of abnormal kidney function on routine lab work (BUN, serum creatinine, or eGFR). (wikipedia.org)
  • It is well-known that as kidney function declines, there is a progressive deterioration in mineral homeostasis, with a disruption of normal serum and tissue concentrations of phosphorus and calcium, and changes in circulating levels of hormones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Provides information on this long-term condition where the kidneys progressively lose their function. (dmoztools.net)
  • blood vessels
  • Over the long term, high blood sugar levels damage tiny blood vessels in the kidneys, impairing their ability to filter the blood properly. (diabetes.ca)
  • regulate
  • The kidneys also regulate the amount of fluid and salts in the body and are important in controlling blood pressure. (diabetes.ca)
  • bone
  • It may include diet changes, vitamins, minerals, and medications to help with growth and to prevent bone disease. (kidshealth.org)
  • Besides acting as a filtration system, your kidneys play a key role in bone and heart health, as well as in the balance of acid and alkaline in your body. (eatright.org)
  • Treatments for anemia and bone disease may also be required. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention
  • Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (nih.gov)
  • Established to facilitate translational and clinical research that will advance the prevention and treatment of kidney diseases. (nih.gov)
  • Provides information on this disease of salmonids, its transmission, the external and internal signs, prevention and management. (dmoztools.net)
  • infection
  • An acquired kidney problem develops over time, often due to an injury, kidney infection, or other illness. (kidshealth.org)
  • Describes the arrival of this disease in North America, the signs of infection, the epizootiology, its incidence and possible control. (dmoztools.net)
  • bladder
  • The pressure from a full bladder can damage the kidneys. (diabetes.ca)
  • Stones are typically classified by their location: nephrolithiasis (in the kidney), ureterolithiasis (in the ureter), cystolithiasis (in the bladder), or by what they are made of (calcium oxalate, uric acid, struvite, cystine). (wikipedia.org)
  • Consumer health resource center providing information on this procedure which refers to a series of x-rays taken of the kidneys, the ureters, and the bladder. (dmoztools.net)
  • severe
  • The most common side effects of indinavir include: Gastrointestinal disturbances (abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting) General malaise and fatigue Nephrolithiasis/urolithiasis (the formation of kidney stones), which sometimes may lead to more severe condition including kidney failure Metabolic alterations including hyperlipidemia (cholesterol or triglyceride elevations) and hyperglycemia Alterations in body shape (lipodystrophy), colloquially known as "Crix belly" Indinavir inhibits urinary nitrous oxide production and may inhibit nitric oxide production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initial symptoms: Fever Nausea Emesis (vomiting) Severe headache Muscle pain Lack of appetite Parotitis in some cases (somewhat rare) Later signs and symptoms: Maculopapular rash Petechial rash Abdominal pain Joint pain Conjunctivitis Forgetfulness The classic triad of findings for this disease are fever, rash, and history of tick bite. (wikipedia.org)
  • Easley's career ended after the 1987 season, when he was diagnosed with severe kidney disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centers
  • In December 2006, Taco Bell restaurants in four Northeastern states emerged as a common link among 71 sickened people across five states, 52 of whom were ultimately confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control to have tested positive the same E. coli strain. (wikipedia.org)
  • fever
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), also known as blue disease, is the most lethal and most frequently reported rickettsial illness in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever remains a serious and potentially life-threatening infectious disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The early clinical presentation of Rocky Mountain spotted fever is nonspecific and may resemble a variety of other infectious and non-infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • levels
  • Prolonged or excessive use of Mylanta can result in damage to the kidneys, decreased levels of phosphate in the body, dizziness, and fainting spells. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • This species is susceptible to the plant disease anthracnose caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. (wikipedia.org)
  • The discovery, in 1934, that calorie restriction can extend lifespan by 50% in rats, and the existence of species having negligible senescence and potentially immortal species such as Hydra, have motivated research into delaying and preventing senescence and thus age-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • type
  • I guess it never occurred to these docs (they're psychiatrists, after all) that type 2 diabetes is a disease of hormonal disregulation caused by insulin resistance arising from impaired glucose tolerance/impaired fasting glucose: in other words, carbohydrate intolerance. (thenutritiondebate.com)
  • development
  • Senescent cells affect tumour suppression, wound healing and possibly embryonic/placental development and a pathological role in age-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)