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  • excess iron
  • 1996}). Excess iron is deposited in a variety of organs leading to their failure, and resulting in serious illnesses including cirrhosis, hepatomas, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, arthritis, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • body
  • The HFE gene makes your body store too much iron. (aafp.org)
  • 1 , 2 Consequently, total body iron levels are precisely regulated under normal physiologic conditions. (aafp.org)
  • The two faulty genes cause your body to absorb more iron than usual from the foods you eat. (nih.gov)
  • treatment
  • The goal of the treatment is to keep a normal level of iron in your blood. (aafp.org)
  • In 1841, the Bohemian doctor and pharmacist Albert Popper published a treatment for Chlorosis containing Vitriolum martis (sulfuric acid and iron) and Sal tartari (potassium carbonate) in Österreichische medicinische Wochenschrift which was republished and refined in the following years. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • 1 Affected patients harbor heterozygous mutations within the iron responsive element (IRE) located in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the L-Ferritin gene ( FTL ). (haematologica.org)
  • early
  • An early report was made of a woman who had developed an undifferentiated soft-tissue sarcoma following multiple injections of iron-dextran complex [ref: (inchem.org)
  • years
  • and one was a reticulum-cell sarcoma with fractures of the pelvis possibly only coincidentally related to iron injections six years before. (inchem.org)
  • Only one, a poorly differentiated spindle-cell fibrosarcoma, was believed likely to be related to iron-dextran injections given 14 years previously [ref: (inchem.org)
  • high
  • People who have a very high iron level may have skin with a bronze or gray color. (aafp.org)
  • give
  • It seems probable that the considerable publicity given to the initial case report [ref: and the tendency to give parenteral iron therapy intravenously may have considerably reduced human exposure to intramuscularly administered iron-dextran complex. (inchem.org)
  • heart
  • Too much iron in the heart can cause irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs) and heart failure . (nih.gov)
  • report
  • In a report on 196 cases of sarcoma of the buttock, four of 90 for whom records on drug use were still available had been given intramuscular injections of iron. (inchem.org)
  • A selective tendency to report receiving iron injections may have introduced bias. (inchem.org)
  • atoms
  • As the iron passes through the Curie temperature there is no change in crystalline structure, but there is a change in "domain structure", where each domain contains iron atoms with a particular electronic spin. (wikipedia.org)
  • In both crystallographic modifications, the basic configuration is a cube with iron atoms located at the corners. (britannica.com)
  • 1994
  • In 1994, the Iron Pagoda was featured on a two-yuan Chinese postage stamp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron Will is a 1994 American adventure film directed by Charles Haid, it stars Mackenzie Astin, Kevin Spacey, David Ogden Stiers, George Gerdes, Brian Cox, Penelope Windust and August Schellenberg. (wikipedia.org)
  • alloys
  • Iron metal has been used since ancient times, although copper alloys, which have lower melting temperatures, were used even earlier in human history. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mechanical properties of iron and its alloys can be evaluated using a variety of tests, including the Brinell test, Rockwell test and the Vickers hardness test. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mostly it appears in iron- carbon alloys such as steels, which contain between 0.003 and about 2 percent carbon (the majority lying in the range of 0.01 to 1.2 percent), and cast irons with 2 to 4 percent carbon. (britannica.com)
  • This versatility of iron-carbon alloys leads to their widespread use in engineering and explains why iron is by far the most important of all the industrial metals. (britannica.com)
  • Sometimes too much charcoal seems to have been used, and iron-carbon alloys, which have lower melting points and can be cast into simple shapes, were made unintentionally. (britannica.com)
  • hemoglobin
  • Every red blood cell in the body contains iron in its hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen to the body's tissues from the lungs. (kidshealth.org)
  • Iron gives hemoglobin the strength to "carry" (bind to) oxygen in the blood, so that oxygen gets to where it needs to go. (kidshealth.org)
  • The red blood cells don't change much at this point because the body uses most of its iron to make hemoglobin. (kidshealth.org)
  • The doctor will likely ask questions about the child's diet and growth and may do a blood test to check for low hemoglobin or iron levels, which could mean the child has anemia. (kidshealth.org)
  • The use of this compound compared with other iron preparations results in satisfactory reticulocyte responses, a high percentage utilization of iron, and daily increase in hemoglobin that a normal level occurs in a reasonably short time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Serum iron tests are typically ordered as follow-up tests when abnormal results are found on routine tests such as a CBC , with decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. (labcorp.com)
  • Ceremonial
  • The use of smelted iron ornaments and ceremonial weapons became common during the period extending from 1900 to 1400 BC About this time, the invention of tempering (see forging ) was made by the Chalybes of the Hittite empire. (encyclopedia.com)
  • settlements
  • Rising to a height of almost 5 metres (16 ft) in places, the ramparts completely surround the village of Stanwick St John and form one of the largest Iron Age settlements in Britain, in extent if not necessarily in population. (wikipedia.org)
  • slag
  • It is a semi-fused mass of iron with fibrous slag inclusions (up to 2% by weight), which gives it a "grain" resembling wood that is visible when it is etched or bent to the point of failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may have weighed up to 5 kilograms (11 pounds) and consisted of almost pure iron with some entrapped slag and pieces of charcoal. (britannica.com)
  • Although the Romans built furnaces with a pit into which slag could be run off, little change in iron-making methods occurred until medieval times. (britannica.com)
  • abundant
  • Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust. (wikipedia.org)
  • The oldest known article of iron shaped by hammering is a dagger found in Egypt that was made before 1350 BC This dagger is believed not to have been made in Egypt but to be of Hittite workmanship. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Stanwick Iron Age Fortifications (also known as 'Stanwick Camp'), a huge Iron Age hill fort , sometimes but not always considered an oppidum , comprising over 9 kilometers (5.6 mi) of ditches and ramparts enclosing approximately 300 hectares (700 acres) of land, are situated in Richmondshire , North Yorkshire , England . (wikipedia.org)
  • charcoal
  • In both cases, smelting involved creating a bed of red-hot charcoal to which iron ore mixed with more charcoal was added. (britannica.com)
  • Bronze Age
  • The Iron Age is the last principal period in the three-age system for classifying ancient societies, preceded by the Bronze Age and the Stone Age . (princeton.edu)
  • The people of the Iron Age developed the basic economic innovations of the Bronze Age and laid the foundations for feudal organization. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Iron Age Period succeeding the Bronze Age , dating from about 1100 bc in the Near East, later in w Europe . (encyclopedia.com)
  • mild steel
  • Sweet iron is a term for cold-rolled "mild steel" or carbon steel that has been work hardened, popular for use in bit mouthpieces used on horses in the western riding disciplines. (wikipedia.org)
  • relatively
  • Pure iron is relatively soft, but is unobtainable by smelting because it is significantly hardened and strengthened by impurities, in particular carbon, from the smelting process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron (Fe) is a relatively dense metal with a silvery white appearance and distinctive magnetic properties. (britannica.com)
  • Unlike
  • Unlike the metals that form passivating oxide layers, iron oxides occupy more volume than the metal and thus flake off, exposing fresh surfaces for corrosion. (wikipedia.org)
  • suitable
  • Iron is a versatile metal and was suitable for tools and weapons, but it was not until the Viking Age that iron incited a revolution in ploughing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hoop iron-suitable for the hoops of barrels, made by passing rod iron through rolling dies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plate iron-sheets suitable for use as boiler plate. (wikipedia.org)
  • mostly
  • Bronze could not be produced in Scandinavia, as tin was not a local natural resource, but with new techniques, iron production from bog iron (mostly in Denmark) slowly gained ground. (wikipedia.org)
  • tend
  • In general, breastfed babies tend to get enough iron from their mothers until they start other foods and liquids. (kidshealth.org)
  • Young athletes who exercise often tend to lose more iron and may also become iron deficient. (kidshealth.org)
  • oxygen
  • Iron helps red blood cells carry oxygen to the body and plays a key role in brain and muscle function. (kidshealth.org)
  • freezing point
  • As molten iron cools past its freezing point of 1538 °C, it crystallizes into its δ allotrope, which has a body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • although
  • Like the other group 8 elements, ruthenium and osmium, iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, −2 to +7, although +2 and +3 are the most common. (wikipedia.org)
  • They retain that description because they are made to resemble objects which in the past were wrought (worked) by hand by a blacksmith (although many decorative iron objects, including fences and gates, were often cast rather than wrought). (wikipedia.org)
  • During this period people learned to smelt iron , although the Hittites had probably developed the first significant iron industry in Armenia soon after 2000 bc. (encyclopedia.com)
  • sometimes
  • Older picky eaters may not eat foods with enough iron, and sometimes parents have trouble finding healthy foods that are high in iron. (kidshealth.org)
  • Doctors sometimes screen earlier for certain children, such as premature babies , who have lower amounts of iron in their bodies at birth than full-term babies. (kidshealth.org)
  • This iron sheeting had a smooth, glossy black surface coating, sometimes greenish-tinged, which did not flake upon bending and made the sheets highly resistant to rusting. (wikipedia.org)
  • steel
  • In The Metallurgy of Iron and Steel, by Henry Stafford Osborn, published 1869, describes a process used successfully which is close to descriptions of the Russian method. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • The data on iron is so consistent that it is often used to calibrate measurements or to compare tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Serum iron levels are often evaluated in conjunction with other iron tests . (labcorp.com)
  • title
  • You know, my first thought on seeing the title was more along the lines of Iron Chef , namely, a tv show in which two surgeons from different hospitals would compete to see who could do a better job with a mystery surgery. (scienceblogs.com)
  • content
  • And that's what we've found with Iron Mountain, a partner that knew how to protect and preserve our content and help us make it fan friendly. (ironmountain.com)
  • metal
  • Iron is also the metal at the active site of many important redox enzymes dealing with cellular respiration and oxidation and reduction in plants and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron represents an example of allotropy in a metal. (wikipedia.org)
  • When you think of iron , you might think of skyscrapers with metal beams infused with iron to make them strong. (kidshealth.org)
  • The manufacture of iron artifacts then required a shaping operation, which involved heating blooms in a fire and hammering the red-hot metal to produce the desired objects. (britannica.com)
  • agricultural
  • Even though the advent of the Iron Age in Scandinavia was a time of great crisis, the new agricultural expansions, techniques and organizations proceeded apace. (wikipedia.org)
  • separate
  • d reading download modelling of iron losses of and belief, and which have some separate to both attainments of rocks. (sftv.org)
  • tools
  • Grasshopper Mod 'Iron' is one of the most classic tools for those who love the game BDSM, seen here in an extremely technical and practical context. (etsy.com)
  • term
  • The Iron Horse term became widely popularized and found frequent use in the century and a half following the competition won by Stephenson's Rocket , in innumerable newspaper articles as well as in various novels. (wikipedia.org)
  • means
  • The grasshopper allows games of both Spancking, and constriction as it allows the fixation of wrists and ankles, by means of iron rings on plates, positioned physiologically with respect to the position of play. (etsy.com)
  • rapid
  • After the downfall of the Hittite empire in 1200 BC, the great waves of migrants spreading through S Europe and the Middle East insured the rapid transmission of iron technology. (encyclopedia.com)
  • However, it can also be due to increased iron requirements (in pregnancy), rapid growth (in children), poor diet, and problems with absorption (stomach or intestinal disease). (labcorp.com)