• currents
  • Sustained currents through ASIC3 ion channels at the modest pH changes that occur during myocardial ischemia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Those more "typical" potassium channels preferentially carry outward (rather than inward) potassium currents at depolarized membrane potentials, and may be thought of as "outwardly rectifying. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other inwardly rectifying channels, termed "strong inward rectifiers," carry very little outward current at all, and are mainly active at voltages negative to the K+ reversal potential, where they carry inward current (the much larger currents below the 0 nA line in figure 1). (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Each subunit binds ions independently of the other, meaning conduction or exchange occur independently in each subunit. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • A channel that is "inwardly-rectifying" is one that passes current (positive charge) more easily in the inward direction (into the cell) than in the outward direction (out of the cell). (wikipedia.org)
  • At membrane potentials negative to potassium's reversal potential, inwardly rectifying K+ channels support the flow of positively charged K+ ions into the cell, pushing the membrane potential back to the resting potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • These channels differ from the potassium channels that are typically responsible for repolarizing a cell following an action potential, such as the delayed rectifier and A-type potassium channels. (wikipedia.org)
  • They, along with the "leak" channels, establish the resting membrane potential of the cell. (wikipedia.org)