• tumor cells
  • In situ hybridization (ISH) is a type of hybridization that uses a labeled complementary DNA, RNA or modified nucleic acids strand (i.e., probe) to localize a specific DNA or RNA sequence in a portion or section of tissue (in situ), or, if the tissue is small enough (e.g., plant seeds, Drosophila embryos), in the entire tissue (whole mount ISH), in cells, and in circulating tumor cells (CTCs). (wikipedia.org)
  • RNA ISH (RNA in situ hybridization) is used to measure and localize RNAs (mRNAs, lncRNAs, and miRNAs) within tissue sections, cells, whole mounts, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). (wikipedia.org)
  • probe
  • The probe must be large enough to hybridize specifically with its target but not so large as to impede the hybridization process. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in situ hybridization requires that many steps be taken with precise optimization for each tissue examined and for each probe used. (wikipedia.org)
  • For hybridization histochemistry, sample cells and tissues are usually treated to fix the target transcripts in place and to increase access of the probe. (wikipedia.org)
  • techniques
  • DNA replication and transcription of DNA into RNA both rely upon nucleotide hybridization, as do molecular biology techniques including Southern blots and Northern blots, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and most approaches to DNA sequencing. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Data from different experiments may be used to normalize the fluorescence intensity while plasmids with a known number of telomeric repeats can be used as standards to help relate telomere fluorescence and telomere length. (wikipedia.org)
  • contribute
  • Bacteria affiliated with the Betaproteobacteria in the shape of long rods or chains of rods were found to contribute most to in situ E1 degradation. (biomedsearch.com)
  • uses
  • As noted above, CISH is much cheaper and is easier to use because it uses bright-field microscopes instead of fluorescence microscopes. (wikipedia.org)