• healers
  • Medicine was practiced by healers, who treated wounds in battle, and by the Physicians, who treated any other disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • At present, medical personnel trained based on Western medicine - such as Filipino nurses, physicians, physical therapists, pharmacists, surgeons among others - coexists with the still thriving group of traditional healers that do not have formal education in scientific medicine who often cater to people living in impoverished areas of the Philippines. (wikipedia.org)
  • This living history program features a display of medicinal herbs and plants, and knowledgeable commentary by an herbalist who will tell visitors how these plants were used by "curanderas" (healers) to treat illness and injuries. (tubacaz.com)
  • cures
  • Despite a system that treats symptoms only, kills 3 to 6 thousand people weekly, cures one thing only to cause another, conventional medicine is still very popular. (whale.to)
  • quackery
  • David Oshinsky, whose last book, Polio: An American Story , was awarded a Pulitzer Prize, chronicles the history of America's oldest hospital and in so doing also charts the rise of New York to the nation's preeminent city, the path of American medicine from butchery and quackery to a professional and scientific endeavor, and the growth of a civic institution. (audible.com)
  • Anatomy
  • Although ancient Chinese medicine was also influenced adversely by the awe felt for the sanctity of the human body, the Nei Ching, attributed to the emperor Huang-Ti (2698-2598 BC), contains a reference to a theory of the circulation of the blood and the vital function of the heart that suggests familiarity with anatomy. (questia.com)
  • surgical
  • Historic artifacts from doctors, pharmacies, and educational institutions together with a reproduction surgical kit and recorded first-hand remembrances will unfold New Jersey's significant medical history. (njtoday.net)
  • In Sumerian medicine the Laws of Hammurabi established the first known code of medical ethics, and laid down a fee schedule for specific surgical procedures. (questia.com)
  • practice
  • No development in science has a greater impact on the human experience than those in the understanding and practice of medicine and The Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum is presenting a remarkable collection of original documents spanning centuries of discovery on our understanding and treatment of the human body. (orangetourism.org)
  • Many more modern historical documents on the science of medicine include a signed page from the 1967 autobiography of Christiaan Bernard, the South African surgeon who performed the first human heart transplant, describing that procedure, and a letter written in 1901 by Joseph Lister, the pioneer of antiseptic practice in surgery. (orangetourism.org)
  • Research
  • The AAHM promotes and encourages research, study, writing, and interest in the history of medicine and allied fields. (histmed.org)
  • The society's lectures by Osler, as the first president, covered William Petty's manuscripts and the history of Anaesthesia, and encouraging research and scholarship in topics. (wikipedia.org)
  • It covers research on the history of medicine and was established in 1946. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Section of the History of Medicine is comprised of an active group of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, affiliates, research staff and visiting professors. (yale.edu)
  • This programme introduces you to the advanced study of the history of medicine and health in the modern period and equips you with the conceptual and practical skills to carry out independent historical research in this field. (kent.ac.uk)
  • The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. (kent.ac.uk)
  • The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. (kent.ac.uk)
  • In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of History was ranked 8th for research intensity and in the top 20 in the UK for research power. (kent.ac.uk)
  • Students take four modules including two compulsory modules (HI835 - Modern Medicine and Health, 1850 to the Present and HI878 - Methods and Interpretations in Historical Research) and two additional specialist modules (to be chosen from a choice of variable yearly options). (kent.ac.uk)
  • cardiovascular
  • This is seen particularly in cardiac disease, where a strong family history is considered a significant cardiovascular risk factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family history of coronary heart disease and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease: Where do we stand? (wikipedia.org)
  • father
  • He is considered the father of the Germ Theory of Medicine and he invented the process of pasteurization. (whale.to)
  • historians
  • His links with American historians led to his appointment to the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historians have generally regarded science and medicine as 'placeless', however, it was concluded that medicine is most certainly dependent on the place in which it is conducted. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Colonial medical historians have traditionally been conscious of place as a key factor in writing history, and the links between Professor David Arnold's presentation in the morning were capitalised and expanded upon. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • modern
  • By the 18th century, Colonial physicians, following the models in England and Scotland, introduced modern medicine to the cities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite the simple fact that the Germ Theory of Medicine was at least a hundred years older than Pasteur, his experiments that supposedly 'proved' this theory have established him as a cornerstone in Modern Medical History. (whale.to)
  • Patients and power relations in modern history are an important vehicle for understanding policy development and implementation. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • The first real light on modern medicine in Europe came with the translation of many writings from the Arabic at Salerno, Italy, and through a continuing trade and cultural exchange with Byzantium. (questia.com)
  • diseases
  • In diseases with a known hereditary component, many otherwise healthy people with a positive family history are tested early, with the aim of an early diagnosis and intervention to prevent the symptoms from developing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Laws
  • Written with Dr. Mukherjee's signature eloquence and passionate prose, The Laws of Medicine is a critical book not just for those in the medical profession but for everyone who is moved to better understand how their health and well-being are being treated. (audible.com)
  • Clinical
  • citation needed] Accurate knowledge of a patient's family history may identify a predisposition to developing certain illnesses, which can inform clinical decisions and allow effective management or even prevention of conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Named after the late clinical pathologist, Norah Schuster, every year, since 1991, three essays in the field of history of medicine or science are chosen to receive this prestigious award. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • In medicine, a social history (abbreviated "SocHx") is a portion of the medical history (and thus the admission note) addressing familial, occupational, and recreational aspects of the patient's personal life that have the potential to be clinically significant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Main
  • You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns. (kent.ac.uk)
  • Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe. (kent.ac.uk)
  • theories
  • His discovery comes from nowhere, and goes nowhere as medicine refused to accept his theories, even though they are well documented with slides, movies, and even a multimedia show. (whale.to)
  • Other alternative medicine practices, such as homeopathy, were developed in western Europe and in opposition to western medicine, at a time when western medicine was based on unscientific theories that were dogmatically imposed by western religious authorities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteopathic practitioners added the courses and training of biomedicine to their licensing, and licensed Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine holders began diminishing use of the unscientific origins of the field, and without the original practices and theories, is now considered the same as biomedicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorders
  • In medicine, a family history (FH or FmHx) consists of information about disorders from which the direct blood relatives of the patient have suffered. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a patient has a strong family history of a particular disorder (or group of disorders), this will generally lead to a lower threshold for investigating symptoms or initiating treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • physicians
  • In most of the American colonies, medicine was rudimentary for the first few generations, as few upper-class British physicians emigrated to the colonies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 18th century, 117 Americans from wealthy families had graduated in medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland, but most physicians learned as apprentices in the colonies. (wikipedia.org)
  • health care
  • There had thus been a long history of government involvement in Saskatchewan health care, and a significant section of it was already controlled and paid for by the government. (wikipedia.org)
  • Western
  • Initial discussion questioned the claims to universality of 'western' medicine, with Professor Arnold suggesting that these were implicit as early as the seventeenth century in the writings of travellers. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • But homeopathy, with its remedies made of water, was harmless compared to the unscientific and dangerous orthodox western medicine practiced at that time, which included use of toxins and draining of blood, often resulting in permanent disfigurement or death. (wikipedia.org)
  • fields
  • wrong losers According to sociologist and anthropologist Marianita "Girlie" C. Villariba a babaylan is a woman mystic who is "a specialist in the fields of culture, religion, medicine and all kinds of theoretical knowledge about the phenomenon of nature. (wikipedia.org)