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  • program
  • BROOKLYN, N.Y., Nov. 06, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Many patients benefit from Kampo medicine, or Japanese herbs, as part of their treatment program. (cnbc.com)
  • Kampo medicine is often combined with acupuncture and moxibustion in a treatment program. (cnbc.com)
  • The program is based at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine (OCIM) within the UCSF School of Medicine. (ucsf.edu)
  • In addition, a major strength of the training program is the clinical advisory faculty who are available to provide technical assistance and consultation on specific integrative medicine approaches that trainees might want to study. (ucsf.edu)
  • The TRIM program will equip a new generation of researchers to expand our knowledge-base about how and whether integrative medicine approaches work for specific health conditions. (ucsf.edu)
  • Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine offers a single program conferring the degree Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.), and several combined degree programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • healers
  • Medicine was practiced by healers, who treated wounds in battle, and by the Physicians, who treated any other disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • At present, medical personnel trained based on Western medicine - such as Filipino nurses, physicians, physical therapists, pharmacists, surgeons among others - coexists with the still thriving group of traditional healers that do not have formal education in scientific medicine who often cater to people living in impoverished areas of the Philippines. (wikipedia.org)
  • This living history program features a display of medicinal herbs and plants, and knowledgeable commentary by an herbalist who will tell visitors how these plants were used by "curanderas" (healers) to treat illness and injuries. (tubacaz.com)
  • cures
  • Despite a system that treats symptoms only, kills 3 to 6 thousand people weekly, cures one thing only to cause another, conventional medicine is still very popular. (whale.to)
  • quackery
  • David Oshinsky, whose last book, Polio: An American Story , was awarded a Pulitzer Prize, chronicles the history of America's oldest hospital and in so doing also charts the rise of New York to the nation's preeminent city, the path of American medicine from butchery and quackery to a professional and scientific endeavor, and the growth of a civic institution. (audible.com)
  • practice
  • The practice of medicine and therapeutics in Cyprus has its roots into ancient times. (wikipedia.org)
  • No development in science has a greater impact on the human experience than those in the understanding and practice of medicine and The Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum is presenting a remarkable collection of original documents spanning centuries of discovery on our understanding and treatment of the human body. (orangetourism.org)
  • Many more modern historical documents on the science of medicine include a signed page from the 1967 autobiography of Christiaan Bernard, the South African surgeon who performed the first human heart transplant, describing that procedure, and a letter written in 1901 by Joseph Lister, the pioneer of antiseptic practice in surgery. (orangetourism.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • This is seen particularly in cardiac disease, where a strong family history is considered a significant cardiovascular risk factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family history of coronary heart disease and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease: Where do we stand? (wikipedia.org)
  • historians
  • His links with American historians led to his appointment to the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historians have generally regarded science and medicine as 'placeless', however, it was concluded that medicine is most certainly dependent on the place in which it is conducted. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Colonial medical historians have traditionally been conscious of place as a key factor in writing history, and the links between Professor David Arnold's presentation in the morning were capitalised and expanded upon. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • hospital
  • Paris Medicine is a term defining the series of changes to the hospital and care received with a hospital that occurred during the period of the French Revolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this point in time hospital medicine was still fundamentally spiritual institutions, focused on nursing, general and spiritual care. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "Ethics of Medicine" department is located on the "Tal" Hospital premises (at Schleichstrasse number 8). (uni-tuebingen.de)
  • The office of the Clinical Ethics Committee at the University Hospital Tübingen is also located in the Institute of Ethics and History of Medicine. (uni-tuebingen.de)
  • Patients
  • Patients and power relations in modern history are an important vehicle for understanding policy development and implementation. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • diseases
  • In diseases with a known hereditary component, many otherwise healthy people with a positive family history are tested early, with the aim of an early diagnosis and intervention to prevent the symptoms from developing. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgical
  • Historic artifacts from doctors, pharmacies, and educational institutions together with a reproduction surgical kit and recorded first-hand remembrances will unfold New Jersey's significant medical history. (njtoday.net)
  • father
  • He is considered the father of the Germ Theory of Medicine and he invented the process of pasteurization. (whale.to)
  • Clinical
  • citation needed] Accurate knowledge of a patient's family history may identify a predisposition to developing certain illnesses, which can inform clinical decisions and allow effective management or even prevention of conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Named after the late clinical pathologist, Norah Schuster, every year, since 1991, three essays in the field of history of medicine or science are chosen to receive this prestigious award. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • In medicine, a social history (abbreviated "SocHx") is a portion of the medical history (and thus the admission note) addressing familial, occupational, and recreational aspects of the patient's personal life that have the potential to be clinically significant. (wikipedia.org)
  • fields
  • wrong losers According to sociologist and anthropologist Marianita "Girlie" C. Villariba a babaylan is a woman mystic who is "a specialist in the fields of culture, religion, medicine and all kinds of theoretical knowledge about the phenomenon of nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, the focus is mainly on developments in the 19th century, and though I touch lightly on further developments in the 20th century, I make no claim to offering a thorough treatment, because ther are so many and their histories are complicated by the inter-disciplinary complexity of fields that characterize our own increasingly postmodern world. (blatner.com)
  • Main
  • You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns. (kent.ac.uk)
  • Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe. (kent.ac.uk)
  • theories
  • His discovery comes from nowhere, and goes nowhere as medicine refused to accept his theories, even though they are well documented with slides, movies, and even a multimedia show. (whale.to)
  • Other alternative medicine practices, such as homeopathy, were developed in western Europe and in opposition to western medicine, at a time when western medicine was based on unscientific theories that were dogmatically imposed by western religious authorities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteopathic practitioners added the courses and training of biomedicine to their licensing, and licensed Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine holders began diminishing use of the unscientific origins of the field, and without the original practices and theories, is now considered the same as biomedicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorders
  • In medicine, a family history (FH or FmHx) consists of information about disorders from which the direct blood relatives of the patient have suffered. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a patient has a strong family history of a particular disorder (or group of disorders), this will generally lead to a lower threshold for investigating symptoms or initiating treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • physicians
  • In most of the American colonies, medicine was rudimentary for the first few generations, as few upper-class British physicians emigrated to the colonies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 18th century, 117 Americans from wealthy families had graduated in medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland, but most physicians learned as apprentices in the colonies. (wikipedia.org)
  • health care
  • There had thus been a long history of government involvement in Saskatchewan health care, and a significant section of it was already controlled and paid for by the government. (wikipedia.org)