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  • elevated histamine levels
  • http://216.239.57.104/search?q=cache:oY00DeoanAMJ:secure.dslabs.com/Documents/inserts/BA-1100.doc+blood+test+urine+histamine+reference+ranges&hl=en ?The HACCP information and prior supplier agreements with the sushi operation should provide controls to prevent potential food safety hazards due to parasites in certain raw fish, elevated histamine levels in certain fish, and other seafood safety concerns? (google.com)
  • In addition, elevated histamine levels can be measured in patients' urine. (medscape.com)
  • neurons
  • Within the brain, histamine is synthesized exclusively by neurons with their cell bodies in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) that lies within the posterior hypothalamus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whyment AD, Blanks AM, Lee K, Renaud LP, Spanswick D. Histamine excites neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vitro via activation of H1 receptors. (wikipedia.org)
  • H3 receptors function as presynaptic autoreceptors on histamine-containing neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dihydrochloride
  • Histamine dihydrochloride (INN, trade name Ceplene) is a salt of histamine which is used as a drug for the prevention of relapse in patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (wikipedia.org)
  • Histamine dihydrochloride is administered in conjunction with low doses of the immune-activating cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) in the post-remission phase of AML, i.e. when patients have completed the initial chemotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The combination of histamine dihydrochloride and interleukin-2 was approved for use in AML patients within the European Union in October 2008 and will be marketed in the EU by the Swedish pharmaceutical company Meda. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histamine dihydrochloride acts by improving the immune-enhancing properties of IL-2, and laboratory studies have shown that this combination can induce immune-mediated killing of leukemic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histamine dihydrochloride has been developed by researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentration
  • Does anyone have any info with respect to concentration of histamine within the mouse brain. (bio.net)
  • In fish left at room temperature, the histamine concentration rapidly increases, reaching toxic concentrations within 12 hours. (medscape.com)
  • The tuna industry has adjusted this receiving histamine level until 30 ppm for individual analysis in order to have a tolerance for the cooking and cleaning process operation which might increase the histamine concentration. (atuna.com)
  • methyltransferase
  • Histamine N-methyltransferase catalyzes the methylation of histamine in the presence of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) forming N-methylhistamine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histamine N-methyltransferase is encoded by a single gene which has been mapped to chromosome 2. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histamine N-Methyltransferase at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Molecular and Cellular Biology portal This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibit
  • The H3 receptor has also been shown to presynaptically inhibit the release of a number of other neurotransmitters (i.e. it acts as an inhibitory heteroreceptor) including, but probably not limited to dopamine, GABA, acetylcholine, noradrenaline, histamine and serotonin. (wikipedia.org)
  • person's
  • Too much copper in a person's system degrades the amount of available histamine, which controls the level of each chemical dispensed. (wisegeek.com)
  • secretion
  • In 1964, it was known that histamine stimulated the secretion of stomach acid, and also that traditional antihistamines had no effect on acid production. (wikipedia.org)
  • They designated the one acted upon by the traditional antihistamines as H1, and the one acted upon by histamine to stimulate the secretion of stomach acid as H2. (wikipedia.org)
  • Imidazole
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=3530640&dopt=Citation ?In humans, histamine ( -imidazole ethylamine) is the most important mediator and is mostly found in the initial phase of an anaphylactic reaction ('immediate type' allergy). (google.com)
  • Histamine has two basic centres, namely the aliphatic amino group and whichever nitrogen atom of the imidazole ring does not already have a proton. (wikipedia.org)
  • antihistamines
  • In our experiments we were able to induce PCD and arm resorption with antihistamines further indicating that histamine is playing a central function in the complex regulatory signalling network underlying competence and metamorphosis. (redorbit.com)
  • release
  • In an attempt to protect the body, the immune system starts a chain reaction that prompts some of the body's cells to release histamine and other chemicals into the bloodstream. (kidshealth.org)
  • Although there is always some histamine in your body, a mosquito bite (for example), causes your body to release more histamine in the area of the bite, making your skin red and itchy. (google.com)
  • Another important site of histamine storage and release is the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell of the stomach. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most important pathophysiologic mechanism of mast cell and basophil histamine release is immunologic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibiotics like polymyxin are also found to stimulate histamine release. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histamine release occurs when allergens bind to mast-cell-bound IgE antibodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reduction of IgE overproduction may lower the likelihood of allergens finding sufficient free IgE to trigger a mast-cell-release of histamine. (wikipedia.org)