• favor
  • Among those who have argued in favor of health care rationing are moral philosopher Peter Singer and Oregon governor John Kitzhaber. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other words - the type of medical care rationing that many conservatives seem to favor, that allow rich people to bid medical care away from the poor by bidding the price above what the poor are capable of paying, would still exist. (blogspot.com)
  • Dr. Emanuel - an oncologist who studies end-of-life issues - told The Washington Times Thursday that he used to favor health care rationing, but no longer does. (cnn.com)
  • Lastly it will kill old people or those who some federal human bean counter says have been assessed to be somehow less deserving of the rationed resource in favor of some other more "important or deserving" group. (freerepublic.com)
  • Obama
  • citation needed] President Obama has noted that U.S. healthcare is rationed based on income, type of employment, and pre-existing medical conditions, with nearly 46 million uninsured. (wikipedia.org)
  • You would think that's a concept fiscal conservatives would applaud, but they're more intent on blocking any expansion of the federal role in health care - and on thwarting President Barack Obama. (juneauempire.com)
  • Judicial Watch has also obtained internal Justice Department documents that suggest Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan helped coordinate the Obama Administration's legal defense of the healthcare law while she served as Solicitor General. (judicialwatch.org)
  • I'm writing in response to John Lengemann's recent editorial in the Oct. 27 issue under 'Letters to the Editor' and his opinion regarding health care and the potential for rationing under the Obama health care plan. (tricitytimes-online.com)
  • There were a number of different health care reforms proposed during the Obama administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • allocate
  • Health care rationing refers to mechanisms that are used to allocate (viz. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pointing to an essay co-written earlier this year by White House health care adviser Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel - the brother of White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel - Palin claims the president wants to enact a rationing system that would "refuse to allocate medical resources to the elderly, the infirm, and the disabled who have less economic potential. (cnn.com)
  • waits
  • Simply put if you add 50 million more patients on the same number of doctors that we currently have it is NOT possible to avoid longer waits and some form of rationing. (cnn.com)
  • outcomes
  • In 2005, Joseph J. Doyle Jr., an economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, studied the health outcomes of people who were seriously injured in automobile accidents - a population he chose because they had little control, at that moment, over what insurance they had or what care they received. (juneauempire.com)
  • He also argued for bundling payments and accountable care organizations, which reward doctors for teamwork and patient outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to a 2015 report from The Commonwealth Fund, although the United States pays almost twice as much per capita towards healthcare as other wealthy countries with universal healthcare, patient outcomes are poorer. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to a 2000 study of the World Health Organization (WHO), publicly funded systems of industrial nations spend less on healthcare, both as a percentage of their GDP and per capita, and enjoy superior population-based health care outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unfortunately
  • The American mindset is that each individual should have options for their own life, and this unfortunately does not coincide with the idea of universal care. (blogspot.com)
  • For those who really don't like the idea of rationalized care and promote private insurance as the way to get around it, unfortunately rationing of health care dollars is not uncommon in the private care model. (blogspot.com)
  • decisions
  • As for making decisions about what care is paid for, and at what price - the indirect form of rationing Kyl warned about - that's a stickier point. (juneauempire.com)
  • Although health-care rationing can be conceived as a socially constructed process, little is known about how decisions emerge within the context of face-to-face doctor-patient interactions. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • resources
  • ration) health care resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • The only resources that do not have to be rationed are those that are so common that everybody can have all they want without effort, or public goods from which individuals cannot be excluded. (blogspot.com)
  • Then it will kill ANY freedom of choice individuals once exercised for their health care, then it will kill the flow of the current resources to those who are unfairly obtaining it so that they can be redistributed in a more just and fair manner. (freerepublic.com)
  • Let spell this one out for you - this explicitly means that health care resources will be denied in specified areas so that they can then be freely provided to Illegal Aliens and people who vote for 0bama. (freerepublic.com)
  • What we have to identify are marginally beneficial, non-cost-worthy health care options that we would be willing to deny to our future selves to guarantee we have sufficient resources to provide health care to everyone," he said. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Up-to-date information about the economic impact of dental diseases is essential for health care decision makers when seeking to make rational use of available resources. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Here, we have just such a case in which market forces - had they been left unfettered - might have allowed for a more rational and humane distribution of healthcare resources. (nationalanalysts.com)
  • And demonizing good-faith efforts to grapple with difficult choices about how to spend limited public healthcare resources sets the process back. (nationalanalysts.com)
  • In many countries with modern medical technology, healthcare systems are facing enormous difficulties in meeting demands such as distributing resources and providing adequate care due to the large number of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long-term care insurance was established by the German welfare state in 1996 to give elderly financial resources for a caregiver. (wikipedia.org)
  • It seeks to improve doctor-patient relationships and promote patient-centered care by informing patients and physicians about overutilization of medical resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some reports indicate that countries comparable to the United States are able to provide better health care to more people while consuming fewer medical resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • organizations
  • Health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that commonly cover the bulk of the population, restrict access to treatment via financial and clinical access limits. (wikipedia.org)
  • The quality of health maintenance organizations and managed care have also been criticized by this same group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allows nonprofit health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that deliver care in their own facilities to participate. (wikipedia.org)
  • elderly
  • Oftentimes health bloggers rage about the 'fruitless end-of-life' attempts where people in terminal disease or the extreme elderly have full code status. (blogspot.com)
  • Because the elderly couldn't find health insurance. (cityprofile.com)
  • To me, the health of our elderly is much more important that spending billions on war. (cityprofile.com)
  • Despite a growing fear of socialized medicine, Johnson believed Medicare was a necessity, and in an effort to provide affordable insurance to elderly residents, he became the first U.S. president to approve a national health insurance policy. (cityprofile.com)
  • The elderly population is one of the most vulnerable populations in the world of health care, mainly because of their susceptibility to contracting disease, limited access to health care insurance, limited or non-existent access to long-term care insurance, and/or reduced quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • The continual increase in the elderly population in Germany signifies that there will be a greater need for health care services to be provided to the elderly, notably long-term care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • This provides families with more support from a public institution, now being responsible for financing care for the elderly, unlike formerly when the high expenses of institutional care caused most families to care for their elderly in their own households. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the emergence of care insurance an emergence of private home-care agencies and new residential arrangements for elderly also arose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, German elderly minorities are underrepresented in professionalized home-based services and residential care. (wikipedia.org)
  • 69% of service recipients are women, which is attributed to women constituting the majority of the elderly of over 80 years old, receiving lower pensions, and requiring more care dependency. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a study conducted in 1992, Louis Harris interviewed 948 elderly people over the age of 65 from Germany in order to have a better understanding of their health care access satisfaction and quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • 29% of German elderly are satisfied with their health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overall, a significant proportion of the elderly population are satisfied with their health care, and a very small amount view out-of-pocket medical expenses as a serious issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Taking this into account along with the long-term care services the elderly are provided, the German elderly generally have good access to short-term and long-term care insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emanuel
  • This is, Emanuel noted, a form of de facto rationing that stems from legislated attempts to constrain market forces that might otherwise have worked to make generic drugs more profitable. (nationalanalysts.com)
  • medical
  • The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act of 1986 requires any properly equipped hospital receiving Medicare funds (nearly all private hospitals) to provide emergency healthcare regardless of citizenship, immigration status, or ability to pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those not able to afford a health insurance policy are unable to acquire one, and sometimes insurance companies pre-screen applicants for pre-existing medical conditions and either decline to cover the applicant or apply additional price and medical coverage conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • As medical technology improves, there's no way all of us can have all the high-end care we want - unless we are willing to pay for it. (juneauempire.com)
  • As the country's leading health care program, Medicare offers qualified residents an affordable solution for their medical needs. (cityprofile.com)
  • Part B Medicare, on the other hand, provides standard medical care, including outpatient surgery, medical equipment and other primary care services. (cityprofile.com)
  • Therefore, the cost of medical care will be greatly reduced since the amount of medical care will be greatly reduced. (csmonitor.com)
  • Fellow, American College of Cardiology Heart Rhythm Society, past vice chairman, continuing medical education committee Heart Failure Society American College of Physicians North Carolina Chapter, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Alpha Omega Alpha Women and Cardiovascular Disease: Addressing Disparities in Care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, a Rabbi, a Catholic priest, and an agnostic might agree that, in this particular case, the best approach is to withhold extraordinary medical care, while disagreeing on the reasons that support their individual positions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Various health professional schools across the U.S. have begun to integrate humanistic medical teaching into their curricula in an effort to offset what some view as an over-emphasis on medical technology to the detriment of individual patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, medical tourists take advantage of price transparency on websites such as MEDIGO and Purchasing Health, which offer hospital price comparison and appointment booking services. (wikipedia.org)
  • disparities
  • He is nationally recognized for his work on the prevention of sudden cardiac death in women and the author of Women and Cardiovascular Disease: Addressing Disparities in Care. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, Imperial College Press published his book, Women and Cardiovascular Disease: Addressing Disparities in Care, which was inspired by his daughter, who has battled insulin-dependent diabetes since age 4. (wikipedia.org)
  • http://www.eplabdigest.com/articles/Women-and-Cardiovascular-Disease-Addressing-Disparities-Care. (wikipedia.org)
  • principles
  • This small-scale study develops a new methodology for investigating which ethical principles of health care rationing the public support after discussion and deliberation. (lse.ac.uk)
  • On the basis of an innovative qualitative data analysis, which translates what people say into ethical principles identified in the theoretical literature, the public appear to support three main rationing principles: (1) a broad 'rule of rescue' that gives priority to those in immediate need, (2) health maximisation and (3) equalisation of lifetime health. (lse.ac.uk)
  • The fundamental principles of humanistic medicine are open communication, mutual respect, and emotional connection between physicians and their patients, termed "relationship-centered" or "patient-centered" care. (wikipedia.org)
  • bills
  • Their bills set up a council on "comparative effectiveness research" to study which forms of care are cost-effective and which are wasteful, but they insist the board won't have power to deny payment for inefficient practices - at least, not now. (juneauempire.com)
  • 2017
  • In October 2017, it was announced that Brighton and Hove Clinical Commissioning Group was to merge with Brighton and Hove City Council, to form a Health and Social Care Integration Board: the merge, commencing in April 2018 and culminating in a full merger a year later, is intended to prevent the duplication of work and streamline provision of health and social care within the city. (wikipedia.org)
  • private
  • Individuals who are able to do so may also pay for private treatments beyond what the NHS offers, but low-income people largely have equal access to health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Access to private health insurance is rationed based on price and ability to pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Private insurance places guidelines on repayment and reimbursement schedules, and primary care doctors have to fill out pre-approval forms for patients to get an MRI or CT. (blogspot.com)
  • Unite the Union surveyed the 3,392 CCG board members in 2015 and reported that 513 were directors of private healthcare companies: 140 owned such businesses and 105 carried out external work for them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health insurance coverage is provided by several public and private sources in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prohibits a private health insurer from selling health insurance coverage that duplicates the benefits provided under this Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • This insurance either provides care services or cash benefits to pay for a private caregiver, such as a family member. (wikipedia.org)
  • obesity
  • Addressing the prevalence of severe obesity and its concomitant morbidities is widely acknowledged as one of the most pressing global health priorities. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Nevertheless, a paucity of effective interventions and universal pressure on health-care budgets means that access to obesity treatments is often limited. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • He mentioned electronic record-keeping, preventing expensive conditions, reducing obesity, refocusing doctor incentives from quantity of care to quality, bundling payments for treatment of conditions rather than specific services, better identifying and communicating the most cost-effective treatments, and reducing defensive medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Used in clinical trials and population health assessments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are NHS organisations set up by the Health and Social Care Act 2012 to organise the delivery of NHS services in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Health and Social Care Act 2012 provides that the areas specified in the constitutions of clinical commissioning groups together cover the whole of England, and do not coincide or overlap. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for arranging emergency and urgent care services within their boundaries, and for commissioning services for any unregistered patients who live in their area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humanistic medicine is an interdisciplinary field in the practice of clinical care, aimed at addressing the problems of modern health systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Increases
  • He wrote that there are three primary ways the U.S. rations healthcare: Increases in healthcare premiums reduce worker pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • A report published by the Commonwealth Fund in December 2007 examined 15 federal policy options and concluded that, taken together, they had the potential to reduce future increases in health care spending by $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient-centered
  • The Stroke Specific Quality Of Life scale SS-QOL: It is a patient-centered outcome measure intended to provide an assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) specific to patients with stroke only. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation
  • citation needed] More recently, Tia Powell led a New York State Workgroup that set up guidelines for rationing ventilators during a flu pandemic. (wikipedia.org)
  • acknowledges
  • The current concept of health-related quality of life acknowledges that subjects put their actual situation in relation to their personal expectation. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Dialysis machines for patients in kidney failure were rationed between 1962 and 1967. (wikipedia.org)
  • By changing that, we'll save billions of dollars while improving the quality of care for patients. (freerepublic.com)
  • These things aren't "rationing" in the old-fashioned sense, but as far as patients are concerned (to quote Kyl), "it's the same result. (juneauempire.com)
  • It's not exactly rationing - but as far as patients are concerned, "it's the same result. (juneauempire.com)
  • He found that uninsured patients stayed in hospitals for less time, received 20 percent less care and died at a rate 37 percent higher than the insured. (juneauempire.com)
  • PCORI claims its research is intended to give patients a better understanding of the prevention, treatment and care options available. (judicialwatch.org)
  • In ten groups of about six people, members of the public are asked to discuss a hypothetical rationing choice, concerning four identified patients who are described in general terms but without detailed information. (lse.ac.uk)
  • In intensive care, disputes sometimes arise when patients or surrogates strongly desire treatment, yet health professionals regard it as potentially inappropriate. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • National Right to Life Executive Director, David N. O'Steen, Ph.D, says, "This is the cruelest and most effective way to ensure that doctors are forced to ration care for their senior citizen patients. (blogspot.com)
  • Patient empowerment seeks to create an equal partnership between doctors and their patients, placing values at the center of the healthcare encounter. (wikipedia.org)
  • As high-deductible health plans rise across the country, with many individuals having deductibles of $2500 or more, their ability to pay for costly procedures diminishes, and hospitals end up covering the cost of patients care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many health systems are putting in place price transparency initiatives and payments plans for their patients so that the patients better understand what the estimated cost of their care is, and how they can afford to pay for their care over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other services exist to assist physicians and their patients, such as Healthcare Out Of Pocket, Accuro Healthcare Solutions, with its CarePricer software. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preventative care can save several hundreds of billions of dollars per year in the U.S., because for example cancer patients are more likely to be diagnosed at Stage I where curative treatment is typically a few outpatient visits, instead of at Stage III or later in an emergency room where treatment can involve years of hospitalization and is often terminal. (wikipedia.org)
  • deny
  • And, although Sarah's insurer may deny it, we also ration it to those who are lucky enough to have access to the big soapbox that she happens to have. (chicagotribune.com)
  • WASHINGTON - The health care bill proposed by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus on September 16 contains a dangerous provision that creates a financial incentive for Medicare doctors to deny treatments to seniors. (blogspot.com)
  • services
  • In other words, more expensive insurance premiums are reducing the growth in household income, which forces tradeoffs between healthcare services and other consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • Defined by regulatory means, healthcare rationing involves restricting health care goods and services from even those who can afford to pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second definition of rationing is the type that one might be familiar with from World War II, where the government passed laws prohibiting people from purchasing more than a certain minimum amount of goods and services deemed essential to the war - such as gasoline and sugar. (blogspot.com)
  • However, proof that the government is going to engage in this second type of rationing requires evidence that the government is going to prohibit people from buying particular goods and services. (blogspot.com)
  • Proximate reasons for the differences with other countries include higher prices for the same services (i.e., higher price per unit) and greater use of healthcare (i.e., more units consumed). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike most markets for consumer services in the United States, the health care market generally lacks transparent market-based pricing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sets forth methods to pay institutional providers of care and health professionals for services. (wikipedia.org)
  • otherwise, they would receive cash benefits that could be used to pay a family member or other individual for informal care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are significant differences in the use of the long-term care services in Germany, depending on social position, ethnic background, and gender. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is attributed to the large number of people in informal family care and their different cultures leading to difficulties in adapting to the existing care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is also a discrepancy in the numbers of women and men that utilize the care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fleck
  • task force on access to health care, Fleck was also awarded the University Distinguished Faculty Award from Michigan State University in 2003, is an elected fellow of the Hastings Center, and was awarded numerous fellowships and grants. (wikipedia.org)
  • afford health insurance
  • Believe me when I tell you that things look a whole lot different when you've worked your butt off your whole life through to secure yourself a home and a little nest egg, only to loose it because you can't afford health insurance or you have pre existing conditions that aren't covered. (cityprofile.com)
  • debate
  • Rationing" is one of the scariest words in the health-care debate. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Newsweek Managing Editor Daniel Klaidman explains that his magazine decided to ask Sen. Ted Kennedy to author a cover piece on health care, because 'his absence during this historic debate had been so palpable, yet here was a way for this respected voice on health care to weigh in and be part of the national conversation at a critical moment. (freerepublic.com)
  • Discussions are chaired by an academic specialising in health policy, whose role is to encourage debate but not actively to participate. (lse.ac.uk)
  • worse
  • Given that the United States devotes far more of its economy to health care than other rich countries, and gets worse results by many measures, it's hard to argue that we are now rationing very rationally. (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretical
  • To our knowledge, this pluralistic viewpoint on rationing has never been developed into a coherent theoretical position, nor into a quantifiable model that health care managers can use for guidance. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Drugs
  • The result: more than 8,300 people - a record number - are on waiting lists in 13 states to get antiretrovirals and other drugs used to treat HIV and AIDS or the side effects, mental health conditions or opportunistic infections. (medicynic.com)
  • HIV drugs are of course the tip of this health care rationing iceberg. (medicynic.com)
  • refuse
  • This is the 'just caring' problem: Why should anyone else pay attention to my demands for justice in meeting my health needs when I refuse to pay attention to their demands for justice in meeting their health needs? (medicalxpress.com)