is it safe for my husband to take gymnema sylvestre if he is taking toprol and norvasc or highblood pressure?


It would be far safer for him to work his way off the blood pressure medications. Gymnema sylvestre is a lot safer than those two high powered medications. Whether there's a contraindication or not, well... your doctor might have that information, or he might not. Doctors seldom get involved in natural supplements.

If you want him healthy again, you'll take the advice of two doctors who are into natural cures for health issues and shy away from powerful medications with all of their nasty side affects. Pay particular attention to Dr. McDougall's "Star McDougaller's" who have quit the drugs and gotten into a healthy lifestyle. I've quit all diabetes medications following a blend of these two diets:
http://www.drmcdougall.com/
http://www.drfuhrman.com/default.aspx  (+ info)

Anybody use Gymnema Sylvestre to help control diabetes or weight loss?


Read about this herb known for being a sugar destroyer, and am trying it. Only a week so far, it hasn't busted the sugar factor, but I can really see a difference in inches melting away, amazingly? Whata ya think?
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I think that gymnema, bitter melon, cinnamon, alpha lipoic acid, fenugreek, and a few others, all help to keep us normalized. My last HbA1C was 5.8, so something I'm doing must be working. Read this for more:
http://www.geocities.com/seabulls69/Type_II_Diabetes.html  (+ info)

Anyone knows how the following herbs affect Diabetes? Fenugreek,Gymnema Sylvestre,Konjac Mannan,Nopal Cactus?


I have Type2 Diabetes and heard that if the mentioned herbs are used correctly, the portion will CURE Diabetes.
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I've taken Gymnema in the past and found that it lowered the overall blood sugars. A few others that I've taken are Morinda Citrifolia (also known as Noni) and just regular cinnamon. These all worked to lower the blood sugars over time, The best being the Noni.  (+ info)

can one take glucophage with Gymnema sylvestre(herb)?


I don't know much about Gymnema sylvestre but it is in a supplement I am taking with 25mg worth. I'm also on glucophage 1500mg a day. Ive heard that they interact with each other and shouldn't be taken together. Can anyone confirm this with some info about this interaction if there is one.

Many thanks
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I found the following on their website:

Gymnema Cautions

Extremely high doses may have the potential to induce hypoglycemia (abnormally low blood sugar) in individuals who are prone to hypoglycemic episodes. In those individuals with active diabetes, it is recommended to consult your personal physician before and during use of gymnema, as alterations to your dosage of insulin or other anti-diabetic medications may be warranted

I would consult my physician before mixing these two drugs.  (+ info)

What is gymnema sylvestre for?


N what are blueberry pills good for?
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While it is still being studied, and the effects of the herb are not entirely known, the herb has been shown to reduce blood sugar levels when used for an extended period of time. Additionally, Gymnema reduces the taste of sugar when it is placed in the mouth, thus some use it to fight sugar cravings. From extract of the leaves were isolated glycosides known as Gymnemic acids, which exhibit anti-sweet activity.[1]

This effect, however, is short-lived, lasting a mere fifteen minutes. Some postulate that the herb actually reduces cravings for sugar by blocking sugar receptors in the tongue, but no scientific studies have supported this hypothesis. It is currently being used in an all natural medication for diabetes with other ingredients such as cinnamon, chromium, zinc, biotin, banaba, huckleberry and bitter melon.

The active ingredient is thought to be gurmenic acid which has structure similar to saccharose. Extracts of Gymnema is not only claimed to curb sweet tooths but also for treatment of as varied problems as hyperglycemia, obesity, high cholesterol levels, anemia and digestion. According to the Sushruta of the Ayurveda it helps to treat Madhumeha ie glycosuria.

In 2005, a study made by King’s College, London, United Kingdom, showed that a water-soluble extract of Gymnema Sylvestre, caused reversible increases in intracellular calcium and insulin secretion in mouse and human β-cells when used at a concentration (0.125 mg/ml) without compromising cell viability. Hence forth these data suggest that extracts derived from Gymnema Sylvestre may be useful as therapeutic agents for the stimulation of insulin secretion in individuals with T2DM.[2]  (+ info)

Looking for Gymnema Sylvestre in tea - loose or bag - form?


This substance, which helps with sugar cravings if swished in the mouth for 1-2 minutes (tried it personally - couldn't taste sugar for 2 hours) is great for those of us with sweet tooths. If you can't taste it, why eat the crap, right? Only I can't find a retailer who sells it in straight tea form. Any ideas? I'm in the Sac, CA area but any major or online retail would be a help. Thanks!
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Since I started to work out I was looking for a good weight loss product (I only wanted something 100% natural). I was on a diet but I felt that I needed a little "help" so I decided to try this great product and I had fantastic results. You can check their website at
http://www.fun-diet-help.us , they give you a free trial and you only pay $6.95 shipping and handling.  (+ info)

Anyone taking Gymnema Sylvestre with type-1 ?


I am curious of the results or side effects caused by taking Gymnema Sylvestre or other types of supplements or herbs and the impact on type-1 diabetes.
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Gymnema sylvestre R.Br. is a herb native to the tropical forests of southern and central India where it has been used as a naturopathic treatment for diabetes for nearly two millennia.Sanskrit Name is Meshasringi, Gurmar

Description

Large climbers, rooting at nodes, leaves elliptic, acuminate, base acute to acuminate, glabrous above sparsely or densely tomentose beneath; Flowers small, in axillary and lateral umbel like cymes, pedicels long; Calyx-lobes long, ovate, obtuse, pubescent; Corolla pale yellow campanulate, valvate, corona single, with 5 fleshy scales. Scales adnate to throat of corolla tube between lobes; Anther connective produced into a membranous tip, pollinia 2, erect, carpels 2,unilocular; locules many ovuled; Follicle long, fusiform1

Chemical composition
The major bioactive constituents of Gymnema sylvestris are a group of oleanane type triterpenoid saponins known as gymnemic acids. The latter contain several acylated (tigloyl, methylbutyroyl etc.,) derivatives of deacylgymnemic acid (DAGA) which is 3-O-glucuronide of gymnemagenin (3, 16, 21, 22, 23, 28-hexahydroxy-olean-12-ene)2. The individual gymnemic acids (saponins) include gymnemic acids I-VII, gymnemosides A-F, gymnemasaponins

Extra Information -
G. sylvestre leaves contain triterpene saponins belonging to oleanane and dammarene classes. Oleanane saponins are gymnemic acids and gymnemasaponins, while dammarene saponins are gymnemasides. Besides this, other plant constituents are flavones, anthraquinones, hentri-acontane, pentatriacontane, α and β- chlorophylls, phytin, resins, d-quercitol, tartaric acid, formic acid, butyric acid, lupeol, β-amyrin related glycosides and stigmasterol. The plant extract also tests positive for alkaloids. Leaves of this species yield acidic glycosides and anthroquinones and their derivatives.

Gymnemic acids have antidiabetic, antisweetener and anti-inflammatory activities. The antidiabetic array of molecules has been identified as a group of closely related gymnemic acids after it was successfully isolated and purified from the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre. Later, the phytoconstituents of Gymnema sylvestre were isolated, and their chemistry and structures were studied and elucidated.

Use as herbal medicine

While it is still being studied, and the effects of the herb are not entirely known, the herb has been shown to reduce blood sugar levels when used for an extended period of time. Additionally, Gymnema reduces the taste of sugar when it is placed in the mouth, thus some use it to fight sugar cravings. From extract of the leaves were isolated glycosides known as Gymnemic acids, which exhibit anti-sweet activity.[1]

This effect, however, is short-lived, lasting a mere fifteen minutes. Some postulate that the herb actually reduces cravings for sugar by blocking sugar receptors in the tongue, but no scientific studies have supported this hypothesis. It is currently being used in an all natural medication for diabetes with other ingredients such as cinnamon, chromium, zinc, biotin, banaba, huckleberry and bitter melon.

The active ingredient is thought to be gurmenic acid which has structure similar to saccharose. Extracts of Gymnema is not only claimed to curb sweet tooths but also for treatment of as varied problems as hyperglycemia, obesity, high cholesterol levels, anemia and digestion. According to the Sushruta of the Ayurveda it is helps to treat Madhumeha ie glycosuria.

In 2005, a study made by King’s College, London, United Kingdom, showed that a water-soluble extract of Gymnema Sylvestre, caused reversible increases in intracellular calcium and insulin secretion in mouse and human β-cells when used at a concentration (0.125 mg/ml) without compromising cell viability. Hence forth these data suggest that extracts derived from Gymnema Sylvestre may be useful as therapeutic agents for the stimulation of insulin secretion in individuals with T2DM.

Mechanism of Action
Gymnemic acid formulations have also been found useful against obesity, according to recent reports. This is attributed to the ability of gymnemic acids to delay the glucose absorption in the blood. The atomic arrangement of gymnemic acid molecules is similar to that of glucose molecules. These molecules fill the receptor locations on the taste buds thereby preventing its activation by sugar molecules present in the food, thereby curbing the sugar craving. Similarly, gymnemic acid molecules fill the receptor location in the absorptive external layers of the intestine thereby preventing the sugar molecules absorption by the intestine, which results in low blood sugar level.

Gymnema sylvestre leaves have been found to cause hypoglycemia in laboratory animals and have found a use in herbal medicine to help treat adult onset diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). When Gymnema leaf extract is administered to a diabetic patient, there is stimulation of the pancreas by virtue of which there is an increase in insulin release. These compounds have also been found to increase fecal excretion of cholesterol, but further studies to prove clinical significance in treating hypercholesterolemia (high serum cholesterol) are required. Other uses for Gymnema leaf extract are its ability to act as a laxative, diuretic, and cough suppressant. These other actions would be considered adverse reactions when Gymnema is used for its glucose lowering effect in diabetes.

Gymnema leaf extract, notably the peptide ‘Gurmarin’, has been found to interfere with the ability of the taste buds on the tongue to taste sweet and bitter. Gymnemic acid has a similar effect. It is believed that by inhibiting the sweet taste sensation, people taking it will limit their intake of sweet foods, and this activity may be partially responsible for its hypoglycemic effect.

There are some possible mechanisms by which the leaves and especially Gymnemic acids from Gymnema sylvestre exert its hypoglycemic effects are:

1. It increases secretion of insulin
2. It promotes regeneration of islet cells.
3. It increases utilization of glucose: it is shown to increase the activities of enzymes responsible for utilization of glucose by insulin-dependant pathways, an increase in phosphorylase activity, decrease in gluconeogenic enzymes and sorbitol dehydrogenase.
4. It causes inhibition of glucose absorption from intestine

The gymnemic acid components are believed to block the absorption of glucose in the small intestine, the exact action being unknown. It could be involve one or more mechanisms.

One of the mechanisms responsible for adult onset diabetes mellitus is a form of insulin resistance, which is attributed to the inability of insulin to enter cells via the insulin receptor. Gymnema may overcome this resistance, but require further studies to confirm its validity and also whether the effect is clinically relevant. Should this effect be proven, Gymnema may prove useful in both adult onset (NIDDM) and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus (IDDM) to help insulin enter cells. In the case of IDDM, the insulin is injected by syringe and is not secreted from the pancreas.

The leaves are also noted for lowering serum cholesterol and triglycerides. The primary chemical constituents of Gymnema include gymnemic acid, tartaric acid, gurmarin, calcium oxalate, glucose, stigmasterol, betaine, and choline. While the water-soluble acidic fractions reportedly provide the hypoglycemic action, it is not yet clear what specific constituent in the leaves is responsible for the same. Some researchers have suggested gymnemic acid as one possible candidate, although further research is needed. Both gurmarin (another constituent of the leaves) and gymnemic acid have been shown to block sweet taste in humans. The major constituents of the plant material 3B glucuronides of different acetylated gymnemagenins, gymnemic acid a complex mixture of at least 9 closely related acidic glucosides.

The following figure could provide a diagrammatic representation for explaining the action of gymnemic acids on the intestinal receptors. The basic function of the acids is to bind to the receptor on the intestine, and stop the glucose molecule from binding to the receptor. Thus, gymnemic acids prevent the absorption of excess glucose.

for more information on diabetes visit
http://www.reddiabetes.com  (+ info)

what is Gymnema sylvestre called in urdu?


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