• byproduct
  • Production will increase as the EU directive 2003/30/EC are implemented, which required the replacement of 5.75% of petroleum fuels with biofuel across all member states by 2010, as glycerol is a byproduct in the production of biodiesel. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result of increasing biodiesel production, formation of the byproduct, crude glycerol, has also increased. (wikipedia.org)
  • substrate
  • After NAD+ is bound to the enzyme, glycerol substrate binds to the active site in such a way as to have two coordinated interactions between two adjacent hydroxyl groups and the neighboring zinc ion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crude
  • While glycerol is commonly used in food, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and other industries, increased production of crude glycerol has become very expensive to purify and utilize in these industries. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1981
  • Glycerol has been used to treat swelling of the brain (cerebral edema) or of the eyes (glaucoma) (Frank, Nahata and Hilty, 1981) . (sportsci.org)
  • glucose
  • I am sure anyone this ignorant of biochemistry should probably not be handling DNA, (more likely DNA is all I should be allowed to handle): all the same I would like to know what determines when to use glycerol or glucose in media. (bio.net)
  • In particular, I have one strain for which it is stipulated that glucose must go in the 'rich' media and on the maintenance plates, but glycerol must be used in the 'induction' media. (bio.net)
  • propylene
  • Glycerol is also synthesized on a commercial scale from propylene (obtained by cracking petroleum), since supplies of natural glycerol are inadequate. (encyclopedia.com)
  • vacuum is helpful due to the high boiling point of glycerol (290 °C). Although usually not cost-effective, glycerol can be produced by various routes from propylene. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathway
  • Glycerol has a caloric density similar to table sugar, but a lower glycemic index and different metabolic pathway within the body, so some dietary advocates[who? (wikipedia.org)