• Nitrogen
  • The necessity for this ligand also connects the high concentration of nitrogen, reflected in excess of glutamate and arginine to produce NAG, to an increase in CPSI activity to clear this excess. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes the body does not produce enough CPSI due to a mutation in the genetic code, resulting in poor metabolism of proteins and nitrogen, as well as high levels of ammonia in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • There seem to be two major groups of asparagine synthetase: Majority of prokaryotic isolated enzymes (asnA) utilize ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eukaryotic isolated and some prokaryotic isolated enzymes (asnB) utilize glutamine as the preferred nitrogen source, although these enzymes can also employ ammonia as an alternate substrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • This list contains a list of EC numbers for the sixth group, EC 6, ligases, placed in numerical order as determined by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • deamination
  • The small subunit contains one active site for the binding and deamination of glutamine to make ammonia and glutamate. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the human body, deamination takes place primarily in the liver, however glutamate is also deaminated in the kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ammonia is toxic to the human system, and enzymes convert it to urea or uric acid by addition of carbon dioxide molecules (which is not considered a deamination process) in the urea cycle, which also takes place in the liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spontaneous deamination of 5-methylcytosine results in thymine and ammonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic
  • This is dangerous because ammonia is highly toxic to the body, especially the nervous system, and can result in retardation and seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • subunit
  • Connecting the two subunits is a tunnel of sorts, which directs the ammonia from the small subunit to the large subunit. (wikipedia.org)