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  • efferent
  • In other words, the filtration rate is dependent on the difference between the higher blood pressure created by vasoconstriction of the input or afferent arteriole versus the lower blood pressure created by lesser vasoconstriction of the output or efferent arteriole. (wikipedia.org)
  • basal
  • In keeping with its housekeeping gene properties, it has been suggested that cystatin C might be influenced by the basal metabolic rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • indicate
  • There are numerous coated vesicles and coated pits along the basolateral domain of the podocytes which indicate a high rate of vesicular traffic. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • The investigators also found that reduced glomerular filtration rate ranked below high systolic blood pressure, high body mass index, and high fasting plasma glucose, but was similar to high total cholesterol, as a risk factor for disability-adjusted life years. (doctorslounge.com)
  • Symptoms of mild hypothermia may be vague, with sympathetic nervous system excitation (shivering, high blood pressure, fast heart rate, fast respiratory rate, and contraction of blood vessels). (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • The glomerular damage may manifest as mesangioproliferative or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis due to depositions of immune complexes in the glomeruli. (hindawi.com)
  • heart rate
  • Working on sino atrial node cells by inhibiting T-type calcium channel activation, Efonidipine prolongs the late phase-4 depolarization of the sino atrial node action potential and suppresses an elevated HR. The negative chronotropic effect of Efonidipine decreases heart rate, myocardial oxygen demand and increases coronary blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • An example is a system in which a protein P that is a product of gene G "positively regulates its own production by binding to a regulatory element of the gene coding for it," and the protein gets used or lost at a rate that increases as its concentration increases. (wikipedia.org)
  • P will maintain its own concentration at a certain level, until some other stimulus will lower it down below the threshold level, when concentration of P will be insufficient to make gene G express at the rate that would overcome the loss or use of the protein P. This state ("on" or "off") gets inherited after cell division, since the concentration of protein a usually remains the same after mitosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additional complications often associated with hypertensive nephropathy include glomerular damage resulting in protein and blood in the urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • heart rate
  • To date, however, stress testing with CMR is almost exclusively performed with pharmacologic stress for several reasons: (i) standard exercise equipment is incompatible with MRI, (ii) CMR can be difficult under post-exercise conditions of high heart rate and rapid breathing, and (iii) the ECG signal is adversely affected by the magnetic field of the MRI system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A slow heart rate with ECG changes including low voltage signals. (candiet.com)
  • Agmatine produces mild reductions in heart rate and blood pressure, apparently by activating both central and peripheral control systems via modulation of several of its molecular targets including: imidazoline receptors subtypes, norepinephrine release and NO production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyperthyroidism frequently causes weight loss with increased appetite, fast heart rate, bulging eyes, and tremor. (wikipedia.org)
  • For heart rate control (atrial fibrillation), plasma levels are less defined and are generally titrated to a goal heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, digoxin levels are considered therapeutic for heart rate control between 0.5 and 2.0 ng/ml (or 0.6 and 2.6 nmol/l). (wikipedia.org)