• alleles
  • Esparza-Gordillo J (2005) Predisposition to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome involves the concurrence of different susceptibility alleles in the regulators of complement activation gene cluster in 1q32. (springer.com)
  • 2001
  • Caprioli J, Bettinaglio P, Zipfel PF et al (2001) The molecular basis of familial hemolytic uremic syndrome: mutation analysis of factor H gene reveals a hot spot in short consensus repeat 20. (springer.com)
  • The Act, the Gene Technology Regulations 2001 (the Regulations) or instruments issued by the Regulator can require compliance with these guidelines in conducting dealings with GMOs or in obtaining and maintaining certification or accreditation. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001). "Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was established as part of the Gene Technology Act 2003 and operates according to the Gene Technology Regulations 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • White Rot Fungi's Size Explained by Breadth of Gene Families Involved "Armillaria species are some of the most devastating forest pathogens, responsible for forest decline in many temperate regions. (doe.gov)
  • Although not specific for humans, it is a partial explanation for the fact that human and other, much more simple species (such as nematodes) have a similar number of genes (in the range of 20 - 25 thousand). (wikipedia.org)
  • A total of 74 OPR genes in 11 species from six major plant lineages were found. (wikipedia.org)
  • These barriers maintain the integrity of a species by reducing gene flow between related species. (wikipedia.org)
  • A different regulator region has been found on Chromosome II of both species that affects the selection behavior of the females. (wikipedia.org)
  • RefSeq
  • 2014 Developed CIRCexplorer to identify thousands of circRNAs in human with p(A)- w/o RNase R RNA-seq data The vast majority of highly expressed exonic circular RNAs identified were processed from exons located in the middle of RefSeq genes, suggesting that the circular RNA formation is generally coupled to RNA splicing. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • The evaluation of these cellular genes in primary CD4 T cell models of HIV latency formed in memory CD4 T cells, Th17 CD4 T cells and Treg CD4 T cells promises to provide key insights into the role of these genes in HIV latency. (grantome.com)
  • enzymes
  • Using genomics, we explore the diversity of fungi to develop catalogs of genes, enzymes, and pathways -- parts lists for bio-based economy and bioenergy applications," said Grigoriev. (eurekalert.org)
  • The structural genes, which encode enzymes for arabinose catabolism, are araB, araA, and araD (collectively known as araBAD). (wikipedia.org)
  • mRNA
  • Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, and qPCR were used to confirm gene transfer and quantify mRNA and protein levels of profibrotic markers in cultures. (arvojournals.org)
  • In eukaryotes, as a gene is transcribed from DNA into a messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript, intervening introns are removed, leaving only exons in the mature mRNA, which can subsequently be translated to produce the protein product. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this case the target-gene repression occurs post-transcriptionally at the level of translation resulting in reduced protein levels but the mRNA levels remain unaffected. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutation
  • To screen the mutation in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator ( RPGR) ORF15 in a large Chinese family with X-linked recessive retinitis pigmentosa and describe the phenotype in affected male and female carriers. (molvis.org)
  • 3. A strain carrying an amber suppressor-sensitive mutation in the i-gene is phenotypically constitutive and also fails to show transient catabolite repression. (biochemj.org)
  • A gene trap mutation of this gene results in impaired glucose tolerance and increased fasting glucose levels whereas a targeted knockout shows defects in osteoclast differentiation and in the skeleton. (jax.org)
  • Chromatin
  • Chromatin immunoprecipitation/deep-sequencing in combination with gene expression profiling reveals direct Klf4 target genes, including E-cadherin (Cdh1), N-cadherin (Cdh2), vimentin (Vim), b-catenin (Ctnnb1), VEGF-A (Vegfa), endothelin-1 (Edn1) and Jnk1 (Mapk8). (uzh.ch)
  • Silencing of SATB1 mimics the effects of IFN-γ treatment on chromatin loop architecture of the MHC class I locus and altered expression of genes within the locus. (wikipedia.org)
  • progression
  • RP shows considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity, featuring wide variations in disease severity, clinical phenotype, age of onset, rate of progression, and mode of inheritance, and over 40 genes are involved. (molvis.org)
  • human
  • We test the hypothesis that polymorphisms of the brain regulator genes MCPH1 and ASPM contribute to variations in human brain size and its correlates. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • While the Regulator must consider risks to human health and safety and the environment relating to dealings with GMOs, other agencies have responsibility for regulating GMOs or genetically modified (GM) products as part of a broader or different mandate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, we characterized Id genes expression in human cornea, and their role in corneal wound healing. (arvojournals.org)
  • A single miRNA has the capability to bind to as many as 200 diverse gene targets ranging from transcription factors, secreted factors, receptors and transporters, thus potentially controlling the expression of about one-third of human mRNAs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifically
  • Specifically, while 5mC is found at repetitive regions of the genome, the methylated adenines were clustered into dense "methylated adenine clusters" (MACs) at gene promoters. (eurekalert.org)
  • This protein is associated with a heterotetrameric complex, specifically interacting with the regulator of G-protein signaling 9, and appears to function as the membrane anchor for the other largely soluble interacting partners. (wikipedia.org)
  • binds
  • An activator binds to a site on the DNA molecule and causes an increase in transcription of a nearby gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • promoters
  • Promoters reside at the beginning of the gene and serve as the site where the transcription machinery assembles and transcription of the gene begins. (wikipedia.org)
  • antibodies
  • We believe that just like antibodies, gene therapy will one day be a mainstay in clinical practice," he said in a statement. (theusdaily.com)
  • OGTR
  • The OGTR reports directly to Parliament through a Ministerial Council on Gene Technology and has legislative powers. (wikipedia.org)
  • bioenergy
  • They comprise a little-explored realm of fungi, providing a repertoire of important and valuable gene products for DOE missions in bioenergy and environment. (eurekalert.org)
  • Gene Atlases of Grass-Microbe Interactions This proposal seeks to build comprehensive gene atlas maps for diverse bioenergy grass-microbe interactions, including pathogenic and beneficial interactions in two grass models, Brachypodium and Setaria. (doe.gov)
  • function
  • Our analysis has shown that 6mA modifications are associated with expressed genes and is preferentially deposited based on gene function and conservation, revealing 6mA as a marker of expression for important functionally-relevant genes. (eurekalert.org)
  • different
  • There are three ways in which exon scrambling can occur: Tandem exon duplication in the genome, which often occurs in cancers Trans-splicing (in which two RNA transcripts fuse), which results in a linear transcript that contains exons that, for example, may be derived from genes encoded on two different chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • transcription
  • In terms of the lac operon, the positive regulator would be the CRP-cAMP complex that must be bound close to the site of the start of transcription of the lac genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • ChIP-chip is an in vivo technique used to determine genomic binding sites for transcription factors in two component system response regulators. (wikipedia.org)
  • differences
  • Although all measures were construct valid and the allele frequencies showed expected population differences, no relationship was found between the genes and any of the criteria. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • role
  • But the exact role of these candidate genes in HIV latency occurring within resting primary CD4 T cells, remain unknown. (grantome.com)
  • shown
  • This enzyme is of interest in plant biology research because the disrupted OPR3 gene has been shown to cause male sterility in Arabidopsis thaliana. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • The evaluation of these genes in resting primary CD4 T cells is hampered by the fact that shRNAs cannot be introduced into these cells using lentiviral vectors. (grantome.com)
  • The present study was undertaken to determine whether three nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (aspirin, ibuprofen, and indomethacin) modulate CFTR gene expression in T-84 cells. (hindawi.com)
  • Analysis of gene expression in normal and cancer cells exposed to g-radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • powers
  • The Regulator is charged with performing functions and exercising powers under the Act and corresponding legislation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The OTGR is a Commonwealth Government Authority within the Department of Health and Ageing and reports directly to Parliament through a Ministerial Council on Gene Technology and has legislative powers. (wikipedia.org)
  • responsible
  • The Regulator is an independent statutory office holder responsible for administering the Gene Technology Act 2000 (the Act) and corresponding state and territory laws. (wikipedia.org)
  • 5 January Scientists from the US and UK have mapped the genome of the bowhead whale and identified genes responsible for its 200-year lifespan, the longest of any mammal. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • Both genes were hypothesized to confer a selective advantage such as increased brain size and general mental ability (GMA). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • A magnetic resonance imaging study has demonstrated a link between common variation in the CDK5RAP2 gene and brain structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Scientists have struggled to find ways to deliver the genes safely, often by using a harmless virus. (theusdaily.com)