• Insects
  • Physically, some insects move their flight muscles directly, others indirectly. (wikipedia.org)
  • In insects with direct flight, the wing muscles directly attached to the wing base, so that a small downward movement of the wing base lifts the wing itself upward. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those insects with indirect flight have muscles that attach to and deform the thorax, causing the wings to move as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insects have traditionally been considered as poikilotherms (animals in which body temperature is variable and dependent on ambient temperature) as opposed to being homeothermic (animals which maintain a stable internal body temperature regardless of external influences). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the term temperature regulation, or thermoregulation, is currently used to describe the ability of insects and other animals to maintain a stable temperature (either above or below ambient temperature), at least in a portion of their bodies by physiological or behavioral means. (wikipedia.org)
  • While many insects are ectotherms (animals in which their heat source is primarily from the environment), others are endotherms (animals which can produce heat internally by biochemical processes). (wikipedia.org)
  • The first mechanism that comes to mind for insects to lose heat during flight is convection because higher speeds necessarily increase convective cooling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several large insects have evolved to warm-up previous to flight so that energetically demanding activities, such as flight, are possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • So, heterothermic insects have adapted to make use of the excess heat produced by flight muscles to increase their thoracic temperature pre-flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, during warm-up these muscles are contracted simultaneously (or almost simultaneously in some insects) to produce no wing movement (or a minimal amount of wing movement) and produce as much heat as possible to elevate thoracic temperatures to flight-levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • bats
  • However, the landings of bats cannot be understood through studies of flight alone because bats roost head-under-heels and cannot hover in this position. (biologists.org)
  • The traditional subdivision into Megachiroptera and Microchiroptera reflected the view that these groups of bats had evolved independently of each other for a long time, from a common ancestor already capable of flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • wings
  • Literature leads to the belief this flight is strongly correlated to the elongated wings of the giant hummingbird, allowing more efficient glides than other Trochilids. (wikipedia.org)
  • with their forelimbs adapted as wings, they are the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • eaten
  • When this animal is eaten by a predator, the parasite survives the digestion process and matures into an adult. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many instances of convergent evolution are known in plants, including the repeated development of C4 photosynthesis, seed dispersal by fleshy fruits adapted to be eaten by animals, and carnivory. (wikipedia.org)
  • thorax
  • When heat is being produced, different temperatures are maintained in different parts of their bodies, for example, moths generate heat in their thorax prior to flight but the abdomen remains relatively cool. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first evidence for insect thermoregulation in flight came from experiments in moths demonstrating that dissipation of heat occurs via hemolymph movement from the thorax to the abdomen. (wikipedia.org)
  • airflow
  • The members of this lab share the fascination for animal flight, which we explore in a sophisticated wind tunnel equipped with cutting-edge equipment for high-speed wing motion analysis, airflow visualization, and force measurement. (lu.se)
  • Flying
  • We see animals walking and crawling on land, flying in air, and swimming in fluid. (springer.com)
  • Thus, any flying animal must be able to decelerate in a controlled manner from its preferred flight speed before landing. (biologists.org)
  • The flying primate hypothesis proposed that, when adaptations to flight are removed, the Megachiroptera are allied to primates by anatomical features not shared with Microchiroptera. (wikipedia.org)
  • This mode of flight involves flying a significant distance horizontally compared to its descent and therefore can be distinguished from a mostly straight downward descent like with a round parachute. (wikipedia.org)
  • The flights of flying fish are typically around 50 meters (160 ft), though they can use updrafts at the leading edge of waves to cover distances of up to 400 m (1,300 ft). (wikipedia.org)
  • horses
  • On Tuesday, a horse was injured and euthanized at Santa Anita Park racetrack, and HBO agreed to suspend filming with the animals after the American Humane Association issued an immediate demand "that all production involving horses shut down" pending an investigation. (cbslocal.com)
  • muscles
  • In order for an animal to fly, its flight muscles need to be capable of high mechanical power output which in turn, due to biochemical inefficiencies, end up producing large amounts of heat. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is probably caused by the flight muscles working at higher levels and consequently, increasing thoracic heat generation. (wikipedia.org)
  • These high temperatures at which flight muscles work impose a constraint on low temperature take-off because an insect at rest has its flight muscles at ambient temperature which is not the optimal temperature for these muscles to function. (wikipedia.org)
  • During flight, these function as antagonistic muscles to produce the wing flapping that allows for sustained flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • similarly
  • In 2004, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) used miniature television cameras attached to falcons and goshawks to obtain live footage, and today some researchers, enthusiasts and artists similarly deploy crittercams with various species of animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • stable
  • The animal was being led to a stable by a groom when it reared and fell back, suffering a head injury, according to HBO. (cbslocal.com)
  • mechanical
  • His mechanical analogue of dragonflies was developed by his company, Animal Dynamics Ltd, to make small Unmanned Aerial Vechicles (aka drones or ornithopters) that will outperform quadcopters. (wikipedia.org)
  • capable
  • Many creatures capable of sustained wing-powered flight also soar unpowered for much of the time they are airborne. (wikipedia.org)
  • The great frigatebird in particular is capable of continuous flights up to several weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • However, this was at a cost of increased oxidative stress post-flight when on a reduced quality diet, but not when on an enhanced, antioxidant-rich diet. (biomedsearch.com)
  • airline
  • In one scene filmed in Florida in 1984, a reproduction Benoist airboat was flown, depicting the inaugural flight of the world's first scheduled airline, the St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line, in 1914. (wikipedia.org)
  • great
  • Are you looking the best price for Night Flight Michael Parkes Fantasy Mystical Animals Print Poster 31.5x27.5 and you want to get great deals & best buy this product? (blogspot.com)
  • move
  • When he asked if he could finish putting his bags away, Keren explains in a Facebook post, quote, "Immediately, she started shouting very loudly 'this is my plane, this is my show, are we going to have a problem, if so I could move you to the next flight with no problem! (aol.com)
  • high
  • Parasites of animals show a high degree of specialization, and reproduce at a faster rate than their hosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Water Works officials have said the restrictions are needed because the shallow lake, which is located next to an urban area, is fragile and environmentally vulnerable to nutrients found in animal waste. (unionleader.com)
  • We found no difference in flight performance between the two diets. (biomedsearch.com)
  • statement
  • ABC News reached out to JetBlue regarding Keren's story and it gave this statement: "The decision to remove someone from a flight is never taken lightly and happens only if it is clear that the customer poses a risk to the safe and comfortable operation of the flight. (aol.com)
  • often
  • Hummingbirds are extremely agile and acrobatic flyers, regularly partaking in sustained hovering flight, often used not only to feed on the wing but to protect their territory and perform courting rituals. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are often microscopic non-animal parasites, namely protozoa, bacteria, or viruses, and their vectors are often parasitic arthropods such as fleas, lice, ticks and mosquitoes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Association
  • The American Humane Association, which oversees animal welfare on Hollywood productions, said that in light of the three deaths "this is arguably the best decision HBO could have made. (cbslocal.com)
  • HBO defended its treatment of the animals, saying it's worked with the humane association and racing industry experts to implement safety protocols that exceed film and TV industry standards. (cbslocal.com)
  • plants
  • Examples of parasites include the plants mistletoe and cuscuta, and animals such as hookworms. (wikipedia.org)
  • These apply to parasites whose hosts are plants as well as animals: Parasitic castrators feed on their host's reproductive tissues, leaving other bodily processes largely intact, and therefore ensuring the host's survival and the freedom of the parasite to remain in the host body for as long as the host continues to live. (wikipedia.org)
  • section
  • He is co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) of Animal Dynamics Ltd and is also chairman of the flight section of the Bionis International Biomimetics Network. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • As a bacteriologist with associations with several others like Emanuel Edward Klein (Charles Smart Roy also worked at the Brown Animal Sanatory Institution) who were involved in a major public debate on vivisection, Hankin was seen by some press reporters as a "vivisector" who had "escaped" to India. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several types of unpowered flight. (wikipedia.org)