• maternal
  • Given the expanded roles of the pediatric cardiologist specializing in fetal medicine and the maternal fetal specialist as collaborative caregivers for fetuses with structural heart disease, arrhythmias, or cardiovascular dysfunction, a new standard of care for the practice of the multidisciplinary, rapidly advancing, and highly specialized field of fetal cardiac medicine is needed," they wrote. (medpagetoday.com)
  • 5. The method of claim 1, wherein selectively purifying fetal DNA from a maternal biological sample using the methylation status of a CpG containing genomic sequence comprises the use of a microarray. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 6. The method of claim 1, wherein selectively purifying fetal DNA from a maternal biological sample using the methylation status of a CpG containing genomic sequence comprises the use of a restriction enzyme that differentially cleaves methylated or unmethylated DNA. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • found that the high-fat diet affects fetal metabolic development, independent of maternal diabetes and obesity. (biologists.org)
  • Many women who carried LCHAD-deficient fetuses developed maternal liver disease. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Over the past few years, we and others have made significant progress in understanding the molecular basis for this fetal-maternal interaction. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The likely mechanisms for the genotype-phenotype correlations in pediatric LCHAD deficiency and the fetal-maternal interaction are discussed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Fetal-maternal hemorrhage, which is the movement of fetal blood cells across the placenta, can occur during abortion, ectopic pregnancy, childbirth, ruptures in the placenta during pregnancy (often caused by trauma), or medical procedures carried out during pregnancy that breach the uterine wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a major cause of HDN, because 75% of pregnancies result in some contact between fetal and maternal blood, and 15-50% of pregnancies have hemorrhages with the potential for immune sensitization. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amount of fetal blood needed to cause maternal sensitization depends on the individual's immune system and ranges from 0.1 mL to 30 mL. (wikipedia.org)
  • For unknown reasons, the incidence of maternal antibodies against type A and B antigens of the IgG type that could potentially cause hemolytic disease of the newborn is greater than the observed incidence of "ABO disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The White classification, named after Priscilla White who pioneered research on the effect of diabetes types on perinatal outcome, is widely used to assess maternal and fetal risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • field of fetal
  • The American Heart Association has released a scientific statement that highlights what is currently known and recommended on the basis of evidence and experience in the rapidly advancing and highly specialized field of fetal cardiac care. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The field of fetal cardiac medicine has expanded greatly in recent decades along with advances in imaging, according to a writing group chaired by Mary Donofrio, MD , of Children's National Medical Center in Washington. (medpagetoday.com)
  • It's exciting to see the groundbreaking work that is occurring in the field of fetal health medicine," says El-Prince. (marketwired.com)
  • coronary heart d
  • For example, in the mid 1980s Rose pointed out that the well established risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD)-cigarette smoking, high serum cholesterol, and high blood pressure-have a limited ability to predict disease risk in adults. (bmj.com)
  • In 1986, Barker published findings proposing a direct link between prenatal nutrition and late-onset coronary heart disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • The Doppler peak systolic velocity in the middle cerebral artery was 0.8 m/s, indicating severe fetal anemia. (hindawi.com)
  • However, persistent severe fetal anemia and placentomegaly caused poor neonatal death and mirror syndrome in the mother. (hindawi.com)
  • Of the survivors, 30% had severe disease almost certainly fatal without treatment, while an additional 30% had moderate disease which would manifest as severe hyperbilirubinaemia that untreated may result in brain damage and/or death. (bmj.com)
  • To determine the efficacy of vorinostat when administered orally in inducing a 4% absolute increase or a 100% increase in fetal hemoglobin levels in subjects with severe sickle cell disease who have failed prior therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To determine the efficacy of vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, SAHA), when administered orally, in a pulsed fashion, once-a-day for 3 consecutive days every week, in inducing a 4% absolute increase or a 100% increase in fetal hemoglobin percent levels (HbF%) in subjects with severe sickle cell disease who have failed prior therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • When the disease is moderate or severe, many erythroblasts (immature red blood cells) are present in the fetal blood, and so these forms of the disease can be called erythroblastosis fetalis (or erythroblastosis foetalis). (wikipedia.org)
  • The inwards spiral and especially the elbow contractures are less severe than in LCCS1 disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In severe disease there may be red blood cell breakdown, a low blood platelet count, impaired liver function, kidney dysfunction, swelling, shortness of breath due to fluid in the lungs, or visual disturbances. (wikipedia.org)
  • Magnesium sulfate may be used to prevent eclampsia in those with severe disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • anemia
  • Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a hereditary anemia that causes the red blood cells to change their shape from a round and doughnut-like shape to a half-moon/crescent, or sickled shape. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • alcohol syndrome
  • As perhaps the most well-known fetal risk, It wasn't until 1973 that fetal alcohol syndrome was first formally diagnosed, and not until 1989 that the United States government began requiring warning labels directed at pregnant women to be in place on all alcoholic beverages for sale. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenotype
  • The information that enters offspring phenotype during early development mirror the mother's own developmental experience and the quality of the environment during her own maturation rather than predicting the possible future environment of the offspring Many human diseases in adulthood are related to growth patterns during early life, determining early-life nutrition as the underlying mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • A genome-wide screening and linkage analysis assigned the disease locus of lethal congenital contracture syndrome, one of 40 Finnish heritage diseases, to a defined region of 9q34, where the GLE1 gene is located. (wikipedia.org)
  • assess
  • We believe that screening family members of patients with muscular interventricular septal aneurysms may be indicated to assess for silent myocardial disease. (biomedsearch.com)
  • cardiovascular disease
  • 1 w1 It seems likely that the large geographic variations in cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, w2 even though at least partly genetic in origin, are influenced by factors acting prenatally and in early life, or by a combination of factors present throughout the life course. (bmj.com)
  • w5 In the large international MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) project, w2 w4 only 25% of the variance in CHD mortality was explained by conventional risk factors. (bmj.com)
  • adult diseases
  • With a summary of findings on the causes and progression of adult diseases at the phase of gametogenesis and embryo development, this book provides insights into the pathogenesis of disease and aids in the treatment and prevention of disease, meeting the requirement for improving the quality of the newborn population, and effectively preventing and curing major diseases at an early stage. (springer.com)
  • Prevention and knowledge of adult diseases of fetal origin or in the early years of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutations
  • Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death. (the-scientist.com)
  • Birth
  • This new research showed that although birth weight is reduced in the offspring of male or female rats that were exposed to dexamethasone during fetal development, this effect was more pronounced in the offspring of male rats exposed to excess glucocorticoids during development in the womb. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This increased the likelihood of the baby rats having a low birth weight and increased their risk of developing diabetes and heart disease in later life, she said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Under the direction of Harrison, the newly created Fetal Treatment Center continued to develop and further refine fetal intervention techniques to treat a range of birth defects. (wikipedia.org)
  • He had noticed that the poorest areas of England were the same areas with the highest rates of heart disease, unearthing the predictive relationship between low birth weight and adult disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • alternatively, it can be a harmful mechanism, when fetal conditions of plenitude or scarcity do not match the world of birth and the child has been physiologically predisposed to inhabit an environment where expected resources are drastically different from reality. (wikipedia.org)
  • arthrogryposis
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (LAAHD) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by reduced mobility of the foetus and early death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) 255310 Norio R (2003). (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • w4 This led to the lifestyle model in understanding the aetiology of chronic diseases, where the key issues are health behaviour and the interaction between genes and an adverse environment in adult life. (bmj.com)
  • These historical cohort studies 3-5 w7 w8 and evidence from animal experiments 1 w9 suggest that chronic diseases are biologically "programmed" in utero or in early infancy. (bmj.com)
  • intervention
  • This was consequently followed by intervention programmes, which have significantly improved heart disease risk status in many countries. (bmj.com)
  • diabetes
  • Regarding the study, which was funded by the U.K. Medical Research Council, Drake said, "It could help inform future research to find interventions that could prevent diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure," Drake said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • lung
  • The funds awarded to Dr. Deprest's study will be used to target prevention of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), an anomaly that disturbs lung development during fetal life. (marketwired.com)
  • When humans are exposed to cadmium over a long period of time, kidney disease and lung disease can occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic: When high amounts of arsenic is inhaled or ingested through coal ash waste, diseases such as bladder cancer, skin cancer, kidney cancer and lung cancer can develop. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic
  • His findings were met with criticism, mainly because at the time heart disease was considered to be predominantly determined by lifestyle and genetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • neonatal
  • It is possible for a newborn with this disease to have neutropenia and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia as well.Hemolysis leads to elevated bilirubin levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • fetuses
  • The Fetal Treatment Center is also currently investigating determine whether steroids might be effective in helping fetuses with large microcystic Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM). (wikipedia.org)
  • circulation
  • Among these antibodies are some which attack antigens on the red blood cells in the fetal circulation, breaking down and destroying the cells (hemolysis). (wikipedia.org)
  • congenital
  • We describe an inherited form of a disorder in which four patients spanning three generations were affected with congenital myocardial disease. (biomedsearch.com)
  • risk
  • Fetal programming of disease risk to next generation depends on paren. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This has led to the concept of fetal programming, suggesting that the environment experienced in the womb can affect development, resulting in an increased risk of later disease. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This increased disease risk can be passed to the next generation," Drake said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Changes in fetal growth pattern have been related to adult disease risk, 1 and there are many theories about the underlying mechanisms affecting cell division during critical periods of tissue development. (bmj.com)
  • The critical periods vary according to the tissue in question, and that is why there have been attempts to explore the timing of exposure in order to predict more specifically the adult disease risk. (bmj.com)
  • and thirdly the specific problems in longitudinal studies which explore these factors and adult disease risk. (bmj.com)
  • w3 However, lifestyle factors only explain part of the heart disease risk, which is why other reasons have been sought. (bmj.com)
  • clinical
  • The authors also discussed the benefits of being able to diagnose fetal cardiac disease and initiate management before delivery, which allows counseling of the parents and prediction of the clinical course of disease in preparation for delivery. (medpagetoday.com)
  • neurodegenerative
  • On the other hand, inappropriate apoptosis resulting in the removal of healthy cells can occur in diseases such as infection, hypoxic-ischaemic injury, neurodegenerative or neuromuscular diseases, and AIDS. (bmj.com)
  • medicine
  • The statement notes that fetal cardiac medicine has evolved considerably over the past 2 decades, predominantly in response to advances in imaging technology and innovations in therapies. (medpagetoday.com)
  • heart
  • There is growing evidence of an increasingly complex and multifactorial aetiology of heart diseases. (bmj.com)
  • treatment
  • It has also striven to develop less invasive means of treatment such as fetendo and fetal image-guided surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Hanmin Lee M.D. is the current Director for the UCSF Fetal Treatment Center, replacing Harrison who is now Director Emeritus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nutrition
  • suggest intense fetal competition for space, nutrition, or other factors during early gestation, with frequent loss or resorption of the other twin(s). (wikipedia.org)