• field of fetal
  • The American Heart Association has released a scientific statement that highlights what is currently known and recommended on the basis of evidence and experience in the rapidly advancing and highly specialized field of fetal cardiac care. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The field of fetal cardiac medicine has expanded greatly in recent decades along with advances in imaging, according to a writing group chaired by Mary Donofrio, MD , of Children's National Medical Center in Washington. (medpagetoday.com)
  • It's exciting to see the groundbreaking work that is occurring in the field of fetal health medicine," says El-Prince. (marketwired.com)
  • coronary heart d
  • For example, in the mid 1980s Rose pointed out that the well established risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD)-cigarette smoking, high serum cholesterol, and high blood pressure-have a limited ability to predict disease risk in adults. (bmj.com)
  • In 1986, Barker published findings proposing a direct link between prenatal nutrition and late-onset coronary heart disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult disease
  • Changes in fetal growth pattern have been related to adult disease risk, 1 and there are many theories about the underlying mechanisms affecting cell division during critical periods of tissue development. (bmj.com)
  • The critical periods vary according to the tissue in question, and that is why there have been attempts to explore the timing of exposure in order to predict more specifically the adult disease risk. (bmj.com)
  • and thirdly the specific problems in longitudinal studies which explore these factors and adult disease risk. (bmj.com)
  • He had noticed that the poorest areas of England were the same areas with the highest rates of heart disease, unearthing the predictive relationship between low birth weight and adult disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • fetuses
  • In his 1995 encyclical Evangelium Vitae , John Paul said, "This moral condemnation also regards procedures that exploit living human embryos and fetuses - sometimes 'produced' for this purpose by in vitro fertilization - either to be used as 'biological material' or as providers or organs or tissue for transplants in the treatment of certain diseases. (ncregister.com)
  • StemCells's patented HuCNS-SC cells are derived from the central nervous system of fetuses and designed to treat diseases affecting all parts of the system, including the eyes. (ncregister.com)
  • The Fetal Treatment Center is also currently investigating determine whether steroids might be effective in helping fetuses with large microcystic Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM). (wikipedia.org)
  • infant
  • Debi Vinnedge, president of Children of God for Life, a Florida organization devoted to fighting the use of fetal-derived products in both the food and drug industries, said it was a long-established practice in biological research to term all non-embryonic cells, whether from fetal, infant or adult stages, as "adult" because they share important characteristics that set them apart from embryonic cells. (ncregister.com)
  • cardiac
  • The statement notes that fetal cardiac medicine has evolved considerably over the past 2 decades, predominantly in response to advances in imaging technology and innovations in therapies. (medpagetoday.com)
  • To create the statement, Donofrio and colleagues reviewed literature covering the diagnosis of congenital heart disease and arrhythmias, the assessment of cardiac function and the rest of the cardiovascular system, and the range of treatments available. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The authors also discussed the benefits of being able to diagnose fetal cardiac disease and initiate management before delivery, which allows counseling of the parents and prediction of the clinical course of disease in preparation for delivery. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Fetal cardiac interventions are currently performed for critical aortic stenosis (CAS), pulmonary atresia intact septum (PA/IVS) and closed atrial septum in hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). (bmj.com)
  • alcohol syndrome
  • As perhaps the most well-known fetal risk, It wasn't until 1973 that fetal alcohol syndrome was first formally diagnosed, and not until 1989 that the United States government began requiring warning labels directed at pregnant women to be in place on all alcoholic beverages for sale. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • A genome-wide screening and linkage analysis assigned the disease locus of lethal congenital contracture syndrome, one of 40 Finnish heritage diseases, to a defined region of 9q34, where the GLE1 gene is located. (wikipedia.org)
  • congenital heart d
  • A total of 80 cases of congenital malformations were diagnosed during the study: 44 cases of congenital heart disease, 40 cases of noncardiac malformations, and a combination of the two in 4 cases. (ahajournals.org)
  • Phenotype
  • The information that enters offspring phenotype during early development mirror the mother's own developmental experience and the quality of the environment during her own maturation rather than predicting the possible future environment of the offspring Many human diseases in adulthood are related to growth patterns during early life, determining early-life nutrition as the underlying mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutations
  • Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death. (the-scientist.com)
  • arthrogryposis
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (LAAHD) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by reduced mobility of the foetus and early death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) 255310 Norio R (2003). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sickle Cell Di
  • Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a hereditary anemia that causes the red blood cells to change their shape from a round and doughnut-like shape to a half-moon/crescent, or sickled shape. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Circulation
  • Among these antibodies are some which attack antigens on the red blood cells in the fetal circulation, breaking down and destroying the cells (hemolysis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk
  • Fetal programming of disease risk to next generation depends on paren. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This has led to the concept of fetal programming, suggesting that the environment experienced in the womb can affect development, resulting in an increased risk of later disease. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This increased disease risk can be passed to the next generation," Drake said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This increased the likelihood of the baby rats having a low birth weight and increased their risk of developing diabetes and heart disease in later life, she said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • w3 However, lifestyle factors only explain part of the heart disease risk, which is why other reasons have been sought. (bmj.com)
  • w5 In the large international MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) project, w2 w4 only 25% of the variance in CHD mortality was explained by conventional risk factors. (bmj.com)
  • Women who have had pre-eclampsia are at increased risk of heart disease and stroke later in life. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiovascular disease
  • 1 w1 It seems likely that the large geographic variations in cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, w2 even though at least partly genetic in origin, are influenced by factors acting prenatally and in early life, or by a combination of factors present throughout the life course. (bmj.com)
  • lung
  • The funds awarded to Dr. Deprest's study will be used to target prevention of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), an anomaly that disturbs lung development during fetal life. (marketwired.com)
  • When humans are exposed to cadmium over a long period of time, kidney disease and lung disease can occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic: When high amounts of arsenic is inhaled or ingested through coal ash waste, diseases such as bladder cancer, skin cancer, kidney cancer and lung cancer can develop. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic
  • His findings were met with criticism, mainly because at the time heart disease was considered to be predominantly determined by lifestyle and genetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • interventions
  • Regarding the study, which was funded by the U.K. Medical Research Council, Drake said, "It could help inform future research to find interventions that could prevent diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure," Drake said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • heart
  • There is growing evidence of an increasingly complex and multifactorial aetiology of heart diseases. (bmj.com)
  • Liver
  • In severe disease there may be red blood cell breakdown, a low blood platelet count, impaired liver function, kidney dysfunction, swelling, shortness of breath due to fluid in the lungs, or visual disturbances. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • Of the survivors, 30% had severe disease almost certainly fatal without treatment, while an additional 30% had moderate disease which would manifest as severe hyperbilirubinaemia that untreated may result in brain damage and/or death. (bmj.com)
  • When the disease is moderate or severe, many erythroblasts (immature red blood cells) are present in the fetal blood, and so these forms of the disease can be called erythroblastosis fetalis (or erythroblastosis foetalis). (wikipedia.org)
  • The inwards spiral and especially the elbow contractures are less severe than in LCCS1 disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Magnesium sulfate may be used to prevent eclampsia in those with severe disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • w4 This led to the lifestyle model in understanding the aetiology of chronic diseases, where the key issues are health behaviour and the interaction between genes and an adverse environment in adult life. (bmj.com)
  • These historical cohort studies 3-5 w7 w8 and evidence from animal experiments 1 w9 suggest that chronic diseases are biologically "programmed" in utero or in early infancy. (bmj.com)
  • life
  • However, LifeSite News, the Toronto-based pro-life news organization, dug into the firm's website to find "human neural stem cells" described more brutally as "fresh human fetal brain tissue. (ncregister.com)
  • Die Krankheiten der ersten Lebenstage, 1885 - Diseases of the first days of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • autoimmune
  • Dysregulation of apoptosis can result in the persistence of mutated cells, leading to malformations, autoimmune disease, and cancer. (bmj.com)
  • It has proven successful in treating more than 70 kinds of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. (ncregister.com)
  • neurodegenerative
  • On the other hand, inappropriate apoptosis resulting in the removal of healthy cells can occur in diseases such as infection, hypoxic-ischaemic injury, neurodegenerative or neuromuscular diseases, and AIDS. (bmj.com)
  • treatment
  • It has also striven to develop less invasive means of treatment such as fetendo and fetal image-guided surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Hanmin Lee M.D. is the current Director for the UCSF Fetal Treatment Center, replacing Harrison who is now Director Emeritus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nutrition
  • suggest intense fetal competition for space, nutrition, or other factors during early gestation, with frequent loss or resorption of the other twin(s). (wikipedia.org)