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  • brachial
  • A computed tomogram was performed, revealing a subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm that compressed the brachial plexus ( Figs. 1 A to 1 D). A few days later, an endovascular covered self-expanding stent was successfully placed, excluding the pseudoaneurysm ( Figs. 1 E to 1 H). Chest pain disappeared, and the patient was discharged uneventfully. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Blood pressure readings on legs are often 10-20% higher than those on the brachial artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • subclavian
  • Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm is a well-described complication as an inadvertent arterial puncture following central venous catheterization ( 2 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • First described in 1975, it is an alternative to central venous catheters in major veins such as the subclavian vein, the internal jugular vein or the femoral vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • aneurysm
  • A true aneurysm is one that involves all three layers of the wall of an artery (intima, media and adventitia). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The heart, including coronary artery aneurysms, ventricular aneurysms, aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva, and aneurysms following cardiac surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The kidney, including renal artery aneurysm and intraparechymal aneurysms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The next most common sites of cerebral aneurysm occurrence are in the internal carotid artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • atherosclerosis
  • When it is blocked through atherosclerosis , percutaneous intervention with access from the opposite femoral may be needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Narrowing (stenosis) is usually caused by the deposition of plaques of atheroma (a fatty substance) on the inner walls of arteries in atherosclerosis. (sciencephoto.com)
  • distal
  • For coronary and peripheral vascular disease, lack of "runoff" to the distal area is also a contraindication because a vascular bypass around one diseased artery to another diseased area does not solve the vascular problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • anatomical
  • We conclude that increased FSS can overcome the anatomical restrictions of collateral arteries and is potentially able to completely restore maximal collateral conductance. (biomedsearch.com)
  • ischemic
  • Damage to the artery following a femoral neck fracture may lead to avascular necrosis (ischemic) of the femoral neck/head. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the skull, when blood flow is blocked or a damaged cerebral artery prevents adequate blood flow to the brain, a cerebral artery bypass may be performed to improve or restore flow to an oxygen-deprived (ischemic) area of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathology
  • The authors review the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment modalities for post-cath femoral pseudoaneurysms. (ozon.ru)
  • genicular
  • The reason for this is the fact that the genicular anastomosis is only present in a minority of individuals and is always undeveloped when disease in the femoral artery is absent. (wikipedia.org)
  • pseudoaneurysms
  • Femoral pseudoaneurysms complicating cardiac catheterization results in significant morbidity. (ozon.ru)
  • This monograph should be useful for interventional cardiologists, vascular medicine specialists and interventional neuroradiologists who would like a comprehensive review of femoral pseudoaneurysms. (ozon.ru)
  • Pseudoaneurysms can be caused by trauma that punctures the artery, such as knife and bullet wounds, as a result of percutaneous surgical procedures such as coronary angiography or arterial grafting, or use of an artery for injection. (wikipedia.org)
  • opposite
  • The direction of the needle in the femoral artery can be against blood flow (retro-grade), for intervention and diagnostic towards the heart and opposite leg, or with the flow (ante-grade or ipsi-lateral) for diagnostics and intervention on the same leg. (wikipedia.org)
  • interventional
  • In total, 200 patients scheduled for various diagnostic or therapeutic interventional radiology procedures requiring femoral artery puncture, will be randomized in two groups after informed consent. (clinicaltrials.gov)