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  • vagina
  • if it isn't a fallopian tube then what is the tube thing near the entrance of the vagina that connects to two seperate parts of it? (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • The most common are: Abnormal smell and colour of vaginal discharge Pain during ovulation Pain during sexual intercourse Pain coming and going during periods Abdominal pain Lower back pain Fever Nausea Vomiting Bloating The infection usually has its origin in the vagina and ascends to the Fallopian tube from there. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other risk factors include surgical procedures that break the cervical barrier, such as: endometrial biopsy curettage hysteroscopy Another risk is factors that alter the microenvironment in the vagina and cervix, allowing infecting organisms to proliferate and eventually ascend to the Fallopian tube: antibiotic treatment ovulation menstruation sexually transmitted disease (STD) Finally, sexual intercourse may facilitate the spread of disease from the vagina to the Fallopian tube. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • There are the following methods of treatment of adhesions in the fallopian tubes: anti-inflammatory therapy, physiotherapy, laparoscopy and removal of adhesions, together with the pipe. (kakprosto.ru)
  • Treatment repeats every 21 days for 6 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Treatment repeats every 3 weeks for up to 12 months (or 17 courses) in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients without evidence of disease progression may continue treatment in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It has been hypothesized that the combination of bevacizumab with CRLX101 might have unique clinical activity in combination in the treatment of this disease due to the simultaneous inhibition of distinct steps along the HIF → (CAIX) → VEGF → VEGFR2 pathway. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • chemotherapy
  • In 1991 it was reported that about half of the patients with advanced stage disease survived 5 years with a surgical approach followed by cisplatinum-based chemotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • adhesions
  • Adhesions (synechia) in the fallopian tubes are one of the causes of infertility in women. (kakprosto.ru)
  • The most common cause of adhesions are inflammatory diseases that arise on a background of gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, chlamydia, ureaplasmosis, mycoplasmosis and other sexually transmitted diseases. (kakprosto.ru)
  • The appearance of adhesions in the fallopian tubes contribute to intrauterine medical procedures such as abortion, insertion of intrauterine device (IUD). (kakprosto.ru)
  • Adhesions pull together, and then glue the walls of the fallopian tubes, preventing the passage of sperm to the eggs. (kakprosto.ru)
  • Thus, the higher the intensity of the endometriosis, the higher the probability of occurrence of adhesions in the fallopian tubes. (kakprosto.ru)
  • Problems were encountered in the ability to enter the tubes, and, even when tubes were cannulated, light reflexions or "white out" from healthy tissue as well as adhesions turned out to be a major problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • uterine
  • With the LEC system the balloon catheter is advanced into the uterine horn, and then, under endoscopic visison the endoscope is advanced into the tube as the balloon catheter unfurls. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ostium is the point where the tubal canal meets the peritoneal cavity, while the uterine opening of the Fallopian tube is the entrance into the uterine cavity, the uterotubal junction. (wikipedia.org)
  • progression
  • If neither death nor progression was observed during the study, PFS data was censored at the last non-progressive disease valid tumor assessment unless the patient was discontinued due to symptomatic deterioration. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Courses repeat every 28 days in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Disease Progression is at least a 20% increase in the sum of LD of target lesions taking as references the smallest sum LD or the appearance of new lesions within 8 weeks of study entry. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Time Frame: PFS is defined as the number of days from randomization to the earlier of death or disease progression for up to 36 months. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Time Frame: Adverse events assessed every 2 weeks during cycle 1, then every 28 days thereafter until each subject's death or disease progression or for up to 36 months, whichever is longest. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Time Frame: Progression free survival defined by central imaging lab using RECIST 1.1 assessed at 8 week intervals, retrospectively, until disease progression, death, subject withdraw of consent or up to 36 months, whichever is longest. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • lesions
  • Complete Response (CR) is disappearance of all target and non-target lesions and no evidence of new lesions documented by two disease assessments at least 4 weeks apart. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Proximal
  • Further, using fluoroscopy or hysteroscopy proximal tubal occlusion can be overcome by unilateral or bilateral selective tubal cannulation, a procedure where a thin catheter is advanced through the proximal portion of the fallopian tube os to examine and possibly restore tubal patency salpinostomy (creating an opening for the tube) or falloposcopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgical
  • Percentage of patients that achieve maximal surgical debulking as defined by no gross residual disease following a Simon's 2-stage design. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Infections
  • The Fallopian tubes may also be occluded or disabled by endometritis, infections after childbirth and intraabdominal infections including appendicitis and peritonitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • In these situations tubes tend to be healthy and typically patients requesting the procedure had children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surgery is still typically recommended if the tube has ruptured, there is a fetal heartbeat, or the person's vital signs are unstable. (wikipedia.org)