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  • stimuli
  • 4. An AEP needs auditory stimuli and, therefore, is applicable only to patients with preserved hearing. (asahq.org)
  • The frequency following response (FFR), also referred to as frequency following potential (FFP) or envelope following response (EFR), is an evoked potential generated by periodic or nearly-periodic auditory stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was originally observed for auditory stimuli but now found to be applicable to other perceptual modalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Auditory stimuli in the form of broadband clicks 100 microseconds in duration are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brainwave entrainment, also referred to as brainwave synchronization and neural entrainment, refers to the capacity of the brain to naturally synchronize its brainwave frequencies with the rhythm of periodic external stimuli, most commonly auditory, visual, or tactile. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even among groups of strangers, the rate of breathing, locomotive and subtle expressive motor movements, and rhythmic speech patterns have been observed to synchronize and entrain, in response to an auditory stimuli, such as a piece of music with a consistent rhythm. (wikipedia.org)
  • N100 is decreased when a person controls the creation of auditory stimuli, such as their own voice. (wikipedia.org)
  • The N100 is often known as the "auditory N100" because it is elicited by perception of auditory stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • The N100 plays a role in recognizing the difference and categorizing these sounds: speech stimuli with a short 0 to +30 ms voice onset time evoke a single N100 response but those with a longer (+30 ms and longer) evoked two N100 peaks and these are linked to the consonant release and vocal cord vibration onset. (wikipedia.org)
  • intraoperative
  • The most common clinical applications of electrocochleography include: Objective identification and monitoring of Ménière's disease and endolymphatic hydrops (EH) Intraoperative monitoring of auditory system function during surgery on the brainstem or cerebellum Enhancement of Wave I of the auditory brainstem response, particularly in patients who are hard of hearing Diagnosis of auditory neuropathy The basilar membrane and the hair cells of the cochlea function as a sharply tuned frequency analyzer. (wikipedia.org)
  • N100
  • It is often referred to with the following P200 evoked potential as the "N100-P200" or "N1-P2" complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • The auditory N100 is generated by a network of neural populations in the primary and association auditory cortices in the superior temporal gyrus in Heschl's gyrus and planum temporale. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are three subtypes of adult auditory N100. (wikipedia.org)
  • N100b or vertex N100, peaking at 100 ms. T-complex N100a, largest at temporal electrodes at 75 ms T-complex N100c, follows N100a and peaks at about 130 ms. The two T-complex N100 evoked potentials are created by auditory association cortices in the superior temporal gyri. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abnormal
  • It is possible that abnormal auditory input during the first two years of life may increase a child's risk for amblyaudia, although the precise relationship between deprivation timing and development of amblyaudia is still unclear. (wikipedia.org)
  • response
  • Part of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), the FFR reflects sustained neural activity integrated over a population of neural elements: "the brainstem response. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first and largest wave (N1) is identical to wave I of auditory brainstem response (ABR). (wikipedia.org)
  • Virtanen J, Ahveninen J, Ilmoniemi RJ, Näätänen R, Pekkonen E. Replicability of MEG and EEG measures of the auditory N1/N1m-response. (wikipedia.org)
  • Source localization of the N400 response in a sentence-reading paradigm using evoked magnetic fields and magnetic resonance imaging. (wikipedia.org)
  • detection
  • We assessed the effects of chronic administration of a subanesthetic dose of ketamine on contextual fear conditioning, detection of pitch deviants and auditory gating. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • patients
  • These symptoms, which include auditory hallucinations, blunted affect and withdrawal, are all common to patients with schizophrenia. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The diagnostic yield of BAEPs has been confirmed in patients with acoustic neuromas, MS, or intra-axial brain stem lesions involving the auditory pathways. (oup.com)
  • deficits
  • however, they do exhibit changes in behavioral tests, suggesting the existence of deficits in temporal or non-auditory processing such as attention (2). (scielo.br)
  • The term "lazy ear" has been used to describe amblyaudia although it is currently not known whether it stems from deficits in the auditory periphery (middle ear or cochlea) or from other parts of the auditory system in the brain, or both. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nevertheless
  • Nevertheless, children with histories of auditory deprivation secondary to these diseases can experience amblyaudia for years after their hearing has been restored. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • Brain Stem Auditory Ev. (oup.com)
  • Amblyaudia is diagnosed when the scores from the two ears are significantly different with the individual's dominant ear score much higher than the score in the non-dominant ear Researchers interested in understanding the neurophysiological underpinnings of amblyaudia consider it to be a brain based hearing disorder that may be inherited or that may result from auditory deprivation during critical periods of brain development. (wikipedia.org)
  • otitis
  • Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the results of LLAEP obtained in children with phonological disorder and to investigate the development of the potential after Speech therapy as well as to correlate the development of potentials and the history of otitis and severity of the phonological disorder. (scielo.br)
  • Recurrent ear infections (otitis media) are the leading cause of temporary auditory deprivation in young children. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurons
  • The depolarized hair cell releases neurotransmitters across a synapse to primary auditory neurons of the spiral ganglion. (wikipedia.org)
  • stimuli
  • 4. An AEP needs auditory stimuli and, therefore, is applicable only to patients with preserved hearing. (asahq.org)
  • The frequency following response (FFR), also referred to as frequency following potential (FFP) or envelope following response (EFR), is an evoked potential generated by periodic or nearly-periodic auditory stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was originally observed for auditory stimuli but now found to be applicable to other perceptual modalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Auditory stimuli in the form of broadband clicks 100 microseconds in duration are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brainwave entrainment, also referred to as brainwave synchronization and neural entrainment, refers to the capacity of the brain to naturally synchronize its brainwave frequencies with the rhythm of periodic external stimuli, most commonly auditory, visual, or tactile. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even among groups of strangers, the rate of breathing, locomotive and subtle expressive motor movements, and rhythmic speech patterns have been observed to synchronize and entrain, in response to an auditory stimuli, such as a piece of music with a consistent rhythm. (wikipedia.org)
  • N100 is decreased when a person controls the creation of auditory stimuli, such as their own voice. (wikipedia.org)
  • The N100 is often known as the "auditory N100" because it is elicited by perception of auditory stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • The N100 plays a role in recognizing the difference and categorizing these sounds: speech stimuli with a short 0 to +30 ms voice onset time evoke a single N100 response but those with a longer (+30 ms and longer) evoked two N100 peaks and these are linked to the consonant release and vocal cord vibration onset. (wikipedia.org)
  • intraoperative
  • The most common clinical applications of electrocochleography include: Objective identification and monitoring of Ménière's disease and endolymphatic hydrops (EH) Intraoperative monitoring of auditory system function during surgery on the brainstem or cerebellum Enhancement of Wave I of the auditory brainstem response, particularly in patients who are hard of hearing Diagnosis of auditory neuropathy The basilar membrane and the hair cells of the cochlea function as a sharply tuned frequency analyzer. (wikipedia.org)
  • N100
  • It is often referred to with the following P200 evoked potential as the "N100-P200" or "N1-P2" complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • The auditory N100 is generated by a network of neural populations in the primary and association auditory cortices in the superior temporal gyrus in Heschl's gyrus and planum temporale. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are three subtypes of adult auditory N100. (wikipedia.org)
  • N100b or vertex N100, peaking at 100 ms. T-complex N100a, largest at temporal electrodes at 75 ms T-complex N100c, follows N100a and peaks at about 130 ms. The two T-complex N100 evoked potentials are created by auditory association cortices in the superior temporal gyri. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abnormal
  • It is possible that abnormal auditory input during the first two years of life may increase a child's risk for amblyaudia, although the precise relationship between deprivation timing and development of amblyaudia is still unclear. (wikipedia.org)
  • response
  • Part of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), the FFR reflects sustained neural activity integrated over a population of neural elements: "the brainstem response. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first and largest wave (N1) is identical to wave I of auditory brainstem response (ABR). (wikipedia.org)
  • Virtanen J, Ahveninen J, Ilmoniemi RJ, Näätänen R, Pekkonen E. Replicability of MEG and EEG measures of the auditory N1/N1m-response. (wikipedia.org)
  • Source localization of the N400 response in a sentence-reading paradigm using evoked magnetic fields and magnetic resonance imaging. (wikipedia.org)
  • detection
  • We assessed the effects of chronic administration of a subanesthetic dose of ketamine on contextual fear conditioning, detection of pitch deviants and auditory gating. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • patients
  • These symptoms, which include auditory hallucinations, blunted affect and withdrawal, are all common to patients with schizophrenia. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The diagnostic yield of BAEPs has been confirmed in patients with acoustic neuromas, MS, or intra-axial brain stem lesions involving the auditory pathways. (oup.com)
  • deficits
  • however, they do exhibit changes in behavioral tests, suggesting the existence of deficits in temporal or non-auditory processing such as attention (2). (scielo.br)
  • The term "lazy ear" has been used to describe amblyaudia although it is currently not known whether it stems from deficits in the auditory periphery (middle ear or cochlea) or from other parts of the auditory system in the brain, or both. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nevertheless
  • Nevertheless, children with histories of auditory deprivation secondary to these diseases can experience amblyaudia for years after their hearing has been restored. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • Brain Stem Auditory Ev. (oup.com)
  • Amblyaudia is diagnosed when the scores from the two ears are significantly different with the individual's dominant ear score much higher than the score in the non-dominant ear Researchers interested in understanding the neurophysiological underpinnings of amblyaudia consider it to be a brain based hearing disorder that may be inherited or that may result from auditory deprivation during critical periods of brain development. (wikipedia.org)
  • otitis
  • Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the results of LLAEP obtained in children with phonological disorder and to investigate the development of the potential after Speech therapy as well as to correlate the development of potentials and the history of otitis and severity of the phonological disorder. (scielo.br)
  • Recurrent ear infections (otitis media) are the leading cause of temporary auditory deprivation in young children. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurons
  • The depolarized hair cell releases neurotransmitters across a synapse to primary auditory neurons of the spiral ganglion. (wikipedia.org)