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  • polymers
  • Concerns about the role of durable polymers as a potential trigger of inflammation and finally adverse events also led to the development of DES with biodegradable coatings, which leave after degradation of the coating only a bare metal stent in the vessel wall that does not induce an inflammatory response. (clinicaltrials.gov)

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  • lesion
  • These studies usually involve evaluation of a composite primary endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and need for repeat procedure involving the lesion where the stent was placed. (medscape.com)
  • Careful selection of stent type according to patient and lesion characteristics as well as monitoring of adherence to dual antiplatelet therapy could maximize the therapeutic potential of these devices. (ovid.com)
  • The cardiologist uses this information to decide whether to treat the lesion with a stent, and if so, what kind and size. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outside the US, physicians may perform "direct stenting" where the stent is threaded through the lesion and expanded. (wikipedia.org)
  • The physician withdraws this catheter and threads the stent on its balloon catheter through the lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • vascular
  • Stents may be implanted in a variety of body lumens or vessels such as within the vascular system, urinary tracts, bile ducts, fallopian tubes, coronary vessels, secondary vessels, etc. (google.com.au)
  • Edelman's research programs fall in the following general categories: Polymer-Based Controlled and Modulated Drug Delivery Vascular Biology, Glycobiology, and Growth Factor Biochemistry Tissue Engineering Biomaterials - Tissue Interactions Device Biology Edelman has authored or co-authored more than 275 original scientific publications, and has trained more than 300 students and post-doctoral fellows. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron stents were shown using an in vivo evaluation method based on the murine abdominal aorta to generate an iron oxide-filled cavity in the vascular wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the drawbacks of vascular stents is the potential for restenosis via the development of a thick smooth muscle tissue inside the lumen, the so-called neointima. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • Less risk of complications, infections etc. and also decreases the necessity for two separate cardiac procedures (bypass and stenting). (wikipedia.org)
  • polymer
  • DES are tiny, metallic scaffolds that are coated with a polymer containing a drug that is released over time to prevent restenosis. (medscape.com)
  • A DES is a combination product consisting of 3 important individual components: the stent, the polymer, and the drug combined together in the finished product. (medscape.com)
  • The FDA needs information on how the stent performs, which starts with laboratory bench testing of the stent and polymer coating, which may be permanently affixed to the stent or may be intended to degrade over time, as well as some safety information about the drug component. (medscape.com)
  • Because of the polymer, 75% of the drug is slowly released over the first 10 days. (ahajournals.org)
  • The newer generations of drug-eluting stents use different platforms, different drugs, and improved polymer coatings. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The drug can only be released when it detaches from the PLA polymer chain, which occurs gradually by a reaction called ester hydrolysis. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Pushing the boundaries of science and medical engineering for the improvement of health: Ultimaster combines an optimal balance between stent design for ultimate conformability with simultaneous polymer resorption and drug release, to match the procedure-triggered biological response in the vessel. (terumo-europe.com)
  • Urban P, Meredith IT, Abizaid A et al (2015) Polymer-free drug-coated coronary stents in patients at high bleeding risk. (springer.com)
  • The researchers achieved temporal control by designing 60-nm hybrid nanoparticles with a lipid shell interface surrounding a polymer core, which was loaded with slow-eluting conjugates of paclitaxel for controlled drug release over 12 days. (healthimaging.com)
  • Polymer-based stents have been approved for use in some countries around the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to reduce the treatment, a new generation of stent has been developed with biodegradable polymer. (wikipedia.org)
  • bioabsorbable
  • To overcome some of these potential drawbacks, several companies are pursuing the development of bioresorbable or bioabsorbable stents. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is much short of the three-to-six month window desired for bioabsorbable stents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Taxus
  • The Taxus Stent was approved in 2003 in Europe and other countries and approved in the United States by the FDA in March 2004. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterial
  • The drug release analysis and optimization for drug-eluting stents in the arterial wall are studied, which involves mechanics, fluid dynamics, and mass transfer processes and design optimization. (hindawi.com)
  • In addition, there is a strong tendency for clots to form at the site where the stent damages the arterial wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • catheter
  • Typically, a stent is implanted in a blood vessel at the site of a stenosis or aneurysm endoluminally, i.e. by so-called "minimally invasive techniques" in which the stent in a radially reduced configuration, optionally restrained in a radially compressed configuration by a sheath and/or catheter, is delivered by a stent delivery system or "introducer" to the site where it is required. (google.com.au)
  • Drug eluting stents are most often sold as a unit, with the stent in its collapsed form attached onto the outside of a balloon catheter. (wikipedia.org)
  • bioresorbable
  • This is the premise for developing bioresorbable stents that naturally dissolve after they are no longer needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • A bioresorbable stent, (also called biodegradable, or naturally-dissolving) serves the same purpose, but is manufactured from a material that may dissolve or be absorbed in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in the case of a bioresorbable stent, the stent will gradually resorb and be benignly cleared from the body, leaving no permanent implant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the goal of a bioresorbable or "temporary" stent is to fully support the vessel during this critical period, and then resorb from the body when it is no longer needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cypher
  • 12-18 The Cypher stent was the first DES to receive both Conformité Européenne (CE)-mark and FDA approval in April 2002 and 2003, respectively ( Figure 3 ). (ahajournals.org)
  • A sirolimus-eluting coronary stent was marketed by Cordis, a division of Johnson & Johnson, under the tradename Cypher. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • This drug reported results of its registration trial at ASCO, June 6, 2016, with encouraging results, leading to approval in the U.S. in April 2017. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 2017, Medinol's EluNIR drug eluting stent, coated with ridaforolimus, received CE Mark in Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Optimization
  • Kriging surrogate model is used to build an approximate function relationship between the drug distribution and the coating parameters, replacing the expensive FEM reanalysis of drug release for DES in the optimization process. (hindawi.com)
  • An adaptive optimization approach based on kriging surrogate model is proposed to optimize the lifetime of the drug in artery wall. (hindawi.com)
  • An implementation of the optimization method for the drug release is then discussed. (hindawi.com)
  • blood vessel
  • He eventually succeeded in creating a prototype of a stainless steel, insertable mesh stent that could be expanded once inside the body to hold a blood vessel or artery open and allow blood to flow more freely. (wikipedia.org)
  • certain devices such as stents can be deployed to keep the blood vessel open. (wikipedia.org)
  • In medicine, a stent is any device which is inserted into a blood vessel or other internal duct in order to expand the vessel to prevent or alleviate a blockage. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgical
  • He had planned to go on to medical school, but was drafted into the army, where he served his two-year stint as a surgical technician. (wikipedia.org)
  • procedure
  • The sizing and the assessments of stent expansion have traditionally been made by viewing a real-time angiogram in the catheterization lab during the procedure. (ptca.org)
  • it is not to be confused with a MIDCAB (minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass) procedure, which uses the smaller thoracotomy incision but does not involve coronary stenting. (wikipedia.org)
  • nanoparticles
  • Researchers at MIT and Harvard Medical School have built targeted nanoparticles that can cling to artery walls and slowly release medicine, an advance that potentially provides an alternative to drug-releasing stents in some patients with cardiovascular disease. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard Medical School have built targeted nanoparticles that can cling to artery walls and slowly release medicine, which could be an alternative to drug-eluting stents in some patients with cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . (healthimaging.com)