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  • consumption
  • Information on consumption of soft drinks, juice, and other dietary items, as well as lifestyle and environmental exposures, was collected through in-person interviews at recruitment. (nih.gov)
  • He gained an international reputation for his book Pure, White, and Deadly: How Sugar Is Killing Us and What We Can Do to Stop It (1972), which warned that the consumption of sugar (sucrose, which consists of fructose and glucose) is dangerous to health, an argument he had made since at least 1957. (wikipedia.org)
  • For human consumption, sucrose is extracted, and refined, from either sugar cane or sugar beet. (wikipedia.org)
  • GSID
  • Other tests which can aid in the diagnosis of GSID but which are not truly diagnostic for the disease are the sucrose breath test, and a genetic test which tests for the absence of certain genes which are thought to be responsible for GSID. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since sucrose-isomaltase is involved in the digestion of starches, some GSID patients may not be able to absorb starches as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • intervention
  • Yu-Poth S, Hao G, Etherton T, Nagiak M, Jonnalagadda S, and Kris-Etherton PM. Effects of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Step 1 and Step II dietary intervention programs on cardiovascular disease risk factors: A meta-analysis. (springer.com)
  • fats
  • During the following tests, P&G noticed a decline in blood cholesterol levels as a side effect of olestra replacing natural dietary fats. (wikipedia.org)
  • infants
  • HFI is typically suspected based on dietary history, especially in infants who become symptomatic after breast feeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the past, infants often became symptomatic when they were introduced to formulas that were sweetened with fructose or sucrose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once identified, parents of infants who carry mutant aldolase B alleles leading to HFI, or older individuals who have clinical histories compatible with HFI can be identified and counselled with regard to preventive therapy: dietary exclusion of foods containing fructose, sucrose, or sorbitol. (wikipedia.org)
  • sugar
  • Sucrose is common table sugar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sucrose is produced naturally in plants, from which table sugar is refined. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sugar mills are located where sugar cane is grown to crush the cane and produce raw sugar which is shipped around the world for refining into pure sucrose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some sugar mills also process the raw sugar into pure sucrose. (wikipedia.org)
  • The by now clear sugar syrup is then concentrated by boiling under vacuum and crystallised as the final purification process to produce crystals of pure sucrose. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purity of sucrose is measured by polarimetry, through the rotation of plane-polarized light by a solution of sugar. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the sucrose (or other sugar) that is replaced has contributed to the texture of the product, then a bulking agent is often also needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diet food substitutes for sugar include aspartame and sucralose, a chlorinated derivative of sucrose. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is 30-50 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar). (wikipedia.org)
  • crossover
  • The cries from 25 preterm neonates from an original sample of 122 were audiorecorded while the infant was undergoing heelstick during a randomized crossover design testing the efficacy of: pacifier with sucrose or water, or prone position as compared to standard care. (nih.gov)
  • High
  • Epidemiological studies provide little evidence to suggest that total dietary carbohydrate predicts risk of type 2 diabetes, and high-carbohydrate, high-fibre diets with low-glycaemic index (GI) may even contribute to diabetes prevention. (cambridge.org)
  • reveal
  • When patients are diagnosed with HFI, a dietary history will often reveal an aversion to fruit and other foods that contain large amounts of fructose. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • The abbreviated term Suc is often used for sucrose in scientific literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sensation of sweetness caused by these compounds (the "sweetness profile") is sometimes notably different from sucrose, so they are often used in complex mixtures that achieve the most natural sweet sensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies
  • Initial studies suggested that the sucrose suppressed the secretion of the parotid hormone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Results from these studies are expected to be used to fine-tune governmental dietary recommendation programs which are designed to help protect public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • introduction hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of pancreatic cancer, but to date no convincing dietary risk factors for Pancreatic cancer is the ninth most common cause of cancer pancreatic cancer have been established . (scribd.com)
  • sweet
  • These are, in general, less sweet than sucrose but have similar bulk properties and can be used in a wide range of food products. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • The same year, he started research at the Dunn Nutritional Laboratory in Cambridge, working principally on the effects of dietary vitamins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neither dietary restraint status as measured by the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire nor the expectancy procedure had effects. (qmu.ac.uk)
  • water
  • The formula for sucrose's decomposition can be represented as 2 step reaction, first simplified reaction is dehydration of sucrose to pure Carbon and water then carbon oxidises to CO2 with O2 from air. (wikipedia.org)
  • subjects
  • Subjects were categorised as 'watchers' or 'non-watchers' of what they ate then received sucrose or artificially sweetened drinks (4 × 250 ml per d). (qmu.ac.uk)
  • It is concluded that sucrose satiates, rather than stimulates, appetite or negative mood in normal-weight subjects. (qmu.ac.uk)
  • metabolism
  • L-arabinose works by reducing the activity of the digestive enzyme responsible for sucrose digestion, sucrase, thus reducing the digestion, absorption and metabolism of sugar. (purityproducts.com)
  • Sucrose intolerance, also called sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID), or genetic sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (GSID), is the condition in which sucrase-isomaltase, an enzyme needed for proper metabolism of sucrose (sugar) and starch (i.e., grains and rice), is not produced or the enzyme produced is either partially functional or non-functional in the small intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • rats
  • We all recall from the paper from the Schwartz lab featuring the world's greatest mis-citation expert, that the first few days of sucrose/fat feeding produces an acute inflammatory lesion in the hypothalamus of rats which get fat on D12492. (blogspot.com)
  • In addition, anandamide injected directly into the forebrain reward-related brain structure nucleus accumbens enhances the pleasurable responses of rats to a rewarding sucrose taste, and enhances food intake as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rats show a preference for sucrose over sucralose, suggesting the importance of calories in reward from food. (wikipedia.org)
  • excess
  • Abdominal cramps and bloating Diarrhea and constipation Vomiting Hypoglycemia and headaches Poor weight gain and growth Upper respiratory tract and viral diseases Anxiety and heart palpitations Excess gas production Sucrose intolerance can be caused by genetic mutations in which both parents must contain this gene for the child to carry the disease (so-called primary sucrose intolerance). (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbohydrate
  • The continuous provision of energy via dietary carbohydrate, lipid, and protein fuels, unmatched by physical activity/energy demand creates a backlog of the products of mitochondrial oxidation, a process associated with progressive mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • responsible
  • Other tests which can aid in the diagnosis of GSID but which are not truly diagnostic for the disease are the sucrose breath test, and a genetic test which tests for the absence of certain genes which are thought to be responsible for GSID. (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • A student of depression avoidance included Sugar Blues as one of its "books which treat either primarily or in particular chapters the role of nutritional and dietary factors in the promotion of mental well-being and prevention of disorder. (wikipedia.org)