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  • blood
  • Avoid tight-fitting clothing or jewellery that can constrict so block the fistula/graft the fistula/graft arm must not be used for monitoring of blood pressure, drawing blood or any intravenous administration Avoid pressure on the fistula/graft after dialysis Rotate the needle's point of entry to avoid aneurysms. (nwdialysis.co.za)
  • times
  • Intriguing investigations from groups in London, Ontario and Toronto, Ontario have suggested that dialysis treatments lasting two to three times as long as, and delivered more frequently than, conventional thrice weekly treatments may be associated with improved clinical outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Implementing six-times weekly, all-night dialysis would overwhelm existing resources in most countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • development
  • According to a 2011 report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the United States of America has the second-highest rate of dialysis use among advanced countries after Japan. (wikipedia.org)
  • dialysate
  • When it's time for dialysis, the patient (or someone who is helping the patient) puts a cleaning solution called dialysate into the body through the catheter. (kidshealth.org)
  • Additionally, it can be used to balance buffer between sample and the solution "dialysis bath" or "dialysate" that the sample is in. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood flows by one side of a semi-permeable membrane, and a dialysate, or special dialysis fluid, flows by the opposite side. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concentrations of solutes (for example potassium, phosphorus and urea) are undesirably high in the blood, but low or absent in the dialysis solution, and constant replacement of the dialysate ensures that the concentration of undesired solutes is kept low on this side of the membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • In dialysis, a sample and a buffer solution (called the dialysate) are separated by a semi-permeable membrane that causes differential diffusion patterns, thereby permitting the separation of molecules in both the sample and dialysate. (wikipedia.org)
  • By contrast, small molecules will freely diffuse across the membrane and obtain equilibrium across the entire solution volume, thereby changing the overall concentration of these molecules in the sample and dialysate (see dialysis figure at right). (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis occurs when a sample is contained in a cellulose bag and is put into a dialysate solution, when equilibrium is achieved between the sample and dialysate only small molecules can exit the cellulose membrane, leaving only the larger particles behind. (wikipedia.org)
  • large dialysis
  • It has successfully remained non-profit and has had the lowest standard mortality rates and standard hospitalization rates among large dialysis providers for the past 13 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Currently they are attempting to misrepresent the most recent changes to CMS regulations to make it more favorable for the large dialysis groups and private insurance companies to make more money. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinic
  • Talk to the dietitian at your dialysis clinic about the right meal plan for you. (kidshealth.org)
  • If you need to go to a dialysis clinic in a different town, call ahead and make sure they can fit you into their schedule. (kidshealth.org)
  • Dialysis Clinic, Inc. is a nonprofit medical corporation founded in 1971 and chartered as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization under IRS regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis Clinic, Inc. (DCI) was founded in 1971 by Dr. Keith Johnson. (wikipedia.org)
  • Just five months later, in April 1971, Dialysis Clinic, Incorporated, was established, a location was secured for the first clinic, negotiations were held with the hospital to move the patients over to the new facility, and patients began dialyzing. (wikipedia.org)
  • DCI Laboratory, founded in 1988 as a division of Dialysis Clinic, Inc., is a full service laboratory responding specifically to the needs of dialysis patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Medical laboratory technologists and dialysis technicians collect samples and perform tests to analyze body fluids, tissue, and other substances. (dialysis-technician.com)
  • For dialysis in a laboratory semipermeable membrane is used as a tube made of cellulose acetate or nitrocellulose where pore size can vary according to the size separation required. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis is a common laboratory technique that operates on the same principle as medical dialysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis membranes for laboratory use are typically made of a film of regenerated cellulose or cellulose esters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today, dialysis tubing for laboratory applications comes in a variety of dimensions and molecular-weight cutoffs (MWCO). (wikipedia.org)
  • DCI's laboratory division was established in response to nephrologists' request for personnel and instrumentation in tune with the dialysis community. (wikipedia.org)
  • membrane
  • This is the classical form of dialysis where the blood is carried via a tube into a dialysis machine which contains a semi permeable membrane. (news-medical.net)
  • In protein purification technique dialysis is used to exchange buffers, loose smaller proteins that can pass through the pores, dilutions of concentrated salts, while leaving the protein of interest inside the semipermeable membrane separated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis works on the principles of the osmosis of solutes and ultrafiltration of fluid across a semi-permeable membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • In biochemistry, dialysis is the process of separating molecules in solution by the difference in their rates of diffusion through a semipermeable membrane, such as dialysis tubing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis can be used to either introduce or remove small molecules from a sample, because small molecules move freely across the membrane in both directions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although dialyzing a sample is relatively simple, a universal dialysis procedure for all applications cannot be provided due to the following variables: The sample volume The size of the molecules being separated The membrane used The geometry of the membrane, which affects the diffusion distance Additionally, the dialysis endpoint is somewhat subjective and application specific. (wikipedia.org)
  • The MWCO of a membrane is the result of the number and average size of the pores created during production of the dialysis membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • The MWCO typically refers to the smallest average molecular mass of a standard molecule that will not effectively diffuse across the membrane during extended dialysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, a dialysis membrane with a 10K MWCO will generally retain greater than 90% of a protein having a molecular mass of at least 10kDa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, it is not practical to separate a 30kDa protein from a 10kDa protein using dialysis across a 20K rated dialysis membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis tubing, also known as Visking tubing, is a type of semi-permeable membrane tubing used in separation techniques, that facilitates the removal or exchange of small molecules from macromolecules in solution based on differential diffusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dialysis tubing is also frequently used as a teaching aid to demonstrate the principles of diffusion, osmosis, Brownian motion and the movement of molecules across a restrictive membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, it is not practical to try separating a 30kDa protein from a 10kDa protein using dialysis across a 20K rated dialysis membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • solute
  • For another solute, bicarbonate, dialysis solution level is set at a slightly higher level than in normal blood, to encourage diffusion of bicarbonate into the blood, to act as a pH buffer to neutralize the metabolic acidosis that is often present in these patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • The two main causes of kidney failure and need for dialysis treatment are diabetes and high blood pressure . (medicinenet.com)
  • Unless you have a kidney transplant , you will need a treatment called dialysis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Dialysis (pronounced: dye-AL-uh-sis) is a medical treatment that can take over the job of filtering blood when the kidneys can't do it properly. (kidshealth.org)
  • Dialysis (also sometimes called kidney dialysis) is a treatment for kidney failure - meaning it steps in to do the job of the kidneys and keep the body in balance. (kidshealth.org)
  • Dialysis is a treatment method that replicates the function of the kidneys when they are failing. (news-medical.net)
  • Drukker W, Haagsma-Schouten WAG, Albert C, Baarda B: Report on regular dialysis treatment in Europe. (springer.com)
  • Dialysis is an imperfect treatment to replace kidney function because it does not correct the compromised endocrine functions of the kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • As albumin dialysis is a costly procedure, financial aspects are important: For a seven-hour treatment with MARS, approximately €300 for 600 ml human serum albumin solution (20%), €1740 for a MARS treatment kit and €125 for disposables used by the dialysis machine have to be spent. (wikipedia.org)
  • dialysis membranes made of polysulfone, polyethersulfone (PES), etched polycarbonate, or collagen are also extensively used for specific medical, food, or water treatment applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • The arterial lumen (typically red) withdraws blood from the patient and carries it to the dialysis machine, while the venous lumen (typically blue) returns blood to the patient (from the dialysis machine). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the context of life science research, dialysis tubing is typically used in the sample clean-up and processing of proteins and DNA samples or complex biological samples such as blood or serums. (wikipedia.org)
  • fluid
  • When the kidneys fail to filter the blood effectively, and fluid and waste products build up in the body to a critical level a person may need to start dialysis. (medicinenet.com)
  • Dialysis treatments replace some of these functions through diffusion (waste removal) and ultrafiltration (fluid removal). (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • In the context of life science research, the most common application of dialysis is for the removal of unwanted small molecules such as salts, reducing agents, or dyes from larger macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, or polysaccharides. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatments
  • They may get dialysis treatments for the rest of their lives. (kidshealth.org)
  • Dialysis treatments can lead to insomnia or sleep apnea, a condition in which someone briefly stops breathing during sleep. (kidshealth.org)
  • If you're getting dialysis, you need to stay as healthy as possible to get the most out of your treatments and avoid the problems mentioned above. (kidshealth.org)
  • Except for special diets and the time needed for treatments, people getting dialysis usually live normal lives. (kidshealth.org)
  • flows
  • Single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD) is a simple method of albumin dialysis using standard renal replacement therapy machines without an additional perfusion pump system: The patient's blood flows through a circuit with a high-flux hollow fiber hemodiafilter, identical to that used in the MARS system. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Dialysis occurs throughout nature and the principles of dialysis have been exploited by humans for thousands of years using natural animal or plant based membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • potassium
  • The dialysis solution has levels of minerals like potassium and calcium that are similar to their natural concentration in healthy blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • routinely
  • The term dialysis was first routinely used for scientific or medical purposes in the late 1800s and early 1900s, pioneered by the work of Thomas Graham. (wikipedia.org)
  • units
  • Viral hepatitis, especially type B hepatitis, is a major problem in dialysis units throughout the world. (springer.com)
  • Jones PO, Goldsmith HJ, Wright FK, Roberts C, Watson DC: Viral hepatitis: a staff hazard in dialysis units. (springer.com)