• sequences
  • TrEMBL was developed to handle the increasing amounts of data being generated by large-scale genomic projects, allowing scientists quicker access to new protein sequences before they were hand-curated and entered into SWISS-PROT. (eurekalert.org)
  • PIR is a joint effort between Georgetown University Medical Center and the National Biomedical Research Foundation in Washington, D.C. PIR was established in 1984 and resulted from the work of Dr. Margaret Dayhoff, Ph.D. Her Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure, published from 1965-1978, was the first comprehensive collection of protein sequences. (eurekalert.org)
  • Automatic Quote will be generated only if sequences qualify for the Guaranteed service, as determined by our proprietary sequence analysis platform, failing which, our Technical Account Manager will contact you with a custom protein production quote. (genscript.com)
  • In this part of the exercise, we shall use Virtual Ribosome - a software that provides a series of functions to translate DNA to protein sequences. (dtu.dk)
  • Note, that the output shows both the DNA, and protein sequences as well as information on START and STOP codons. (dtu.dk)
  • The data may be either a list of database accession numbers, NCBI gi numbers, or sequences in FASTA format. (utmb.edu)
  • No BLAST database contains all the sequences at NCBI. (utmb.edu)
  • The search will be restricted to the sequences in the database which are from the organism selected. (utmb.edu)
  • Protein the NIH protein database, a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and Third Party Annotation, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB Proteopedia the collaborative, 3D encyclopedia of proteins and other molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, includes protein pathways and gene sequences including other tools. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is both a repository and a validated and curated resource for the three-dimensional structural data of molecules generally containing at least carbon and hydrogen, comprising a wide range of organic, metal-organic and organometallic molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell nuclei contain most of the cell's genetic material, organized as multiple long linear DNA molecules in complex with a large variety of proteins, such as histones, to form chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pores cross both nuclear membranes, providing a channel through which larger molecules must be actively transported by carrier proteins while allowing free movement of small molecules and ions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Movement of large molecules such as proteins and RNA through the pores is required for both gene expression and the maintenance of chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the interior of the nucleus does not contain any membrane-bound sub compartments, its contents are not uniform, and a number of sub-nuclear bodies exist, made up of unique proteins, RNA molecules, and particular parts of the chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the exosomal protein composition varies with the cell and tissue of origin, most exosomes contain an evolutionarily-conserved common set of protein molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • The protein content of a single exosome, given certain assumptions of protein size and configuration, and packing parameters, can be about 20,000 molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • motifs
  • Dear Bio-soft community: I am interested in gathering information on 'confirmed' protein-binding DNA motifs from prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. (bio.net)
  • repository
  • BETHESDA, Md., Oct. 23, 2002 - Throwing its financial support behind the concept of a centralized repository for protein data, the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), in cooperation with five other institutes and centers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded a three-year, $15-million grant to combine three of the world's current protein sequence databases into a single global resource. (eurekalert.org)
  • structural
  • http://www.pasteur.fr/cgi-bin/biology/bnb_s.pl?bool=et&english=1&rsc=database&query=second&english=1 http://www.pasteur.fr/cgi-bin/biology/bnb_s.pl?bool=et&english=1&rsc=database&bio=structural+biology in the BioNetbook ( http://www.pasteur.fr/recherche/BNB/bnb-en.html ). (bio.net)
  • The prototype of a new Structural Classification of Proteins 2 (SCOP2) database has been made publicly available. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though most instances, in this case either proteins or a specific structure determinations of a protein, also contain sequence information and some databases even provide means for performing sequence based queries, the primary attribute of a structure database is structural information, whereas sequence databases focus on sequence information, and contain no structural information for the majority of entries. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the rapid developments in computing taking place at this time, this collection was encoded in electronic form and became known as the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). (wikipedia.org)
  • source of protein
  • The action is aimed at ensuring that researchers around the world will have free, unrestricted access to a comprehensive and non-redundant source of protein information, as well as creating a powerful tool for the study of human disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • biology
  • It was maintained by Alexey G. Murzin and his colleagues in the Centre for Protein Engineering until its closure in 2010 and subsequently at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • About the same time, centralizing protein database information became a goal at NHGRI, which with the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM), originally proposed the grant in 2001 as a single award of $4.5 million a year for each of three years, starting in fiscal year 2002 or 2003. (eurekalert.org)
  • The database was initially released in 2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • When known, the sub-nuclear compartment where the protein was found is reported. (programmableweb.com)
  • mDia1 (also known as Dia1, Drf1 for Diaphanous-related formin-1, Diaph1, KIAA4062, p140mDia, mKIAA4062, or D18Wsu154e) is a member of the protein family called the formins and is a Rho effector. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifically, Murthy tried to pass some elements of the known protein 1TAQ as a new protein, 1CMW. (wikipedia.org)
  • Find
  • The interface for the database allows researchers to find proteins with a range of conformational flexibility allowing them to find highly flexible proteins for example. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the authors of this study did not find RNA-induced silencing complex-associated proteins in these exosomes, they suggested that only the pre-miRNAs but not the mature miRNAs in MSC exosomes have the potential to be biologically active in the recipient cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • functions
  • In Lunde's article, their group has introduced different types of RNA-binding protein motif and their specific functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Different from CCHH zinc figure, the shape of the protein is the primary determinant of specificity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins with the same shapes but having little sequence or functional similarity are placed in different superfamilies, and are assumed to have only a very distant common ancestor. (wikipedia.org)