• genes
  • With this genetic database, we identified the most impacted genes, toxicity pathways, and biological functions in mahi-mahi after Deepwater Horizon oil exposure," said Schlenk and Xu. (gulfresearchinitiative.org)
  • SHARe is accessed through the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), a Web-based resource for archiving and distributing data from genome-wide association studies that examine the associations between genes and traits such as weight, cholesterol levels, or the presence/absence of disease. (bio-medicine.org)
  • FINLAY MACRAE: We're leading the field across all 26,000 genes across the genome, in terms of a process by which we can handle this question of interpreting genetic changes. (abc.net.au)
  • RACHAEL BROWN: He says it could help with the interpretation of genetic changes that occur in familial breast cancer, BRCA genes, and in inheritable neurological conditions and blood diseases. (abc.net.au)
  • Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products. (uams.edu)
  • This database keeps track of mutations in the causal genes for that genetic diseases common in India. (wikipedia.org)
  • The database is being updated and the mutation listings for some genes may be incomplete. (euro-wabb.org)
  • The data come from one of the nation's largest and most diverse genomics projects - the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort - which was developed collaboratively by the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) and UC San Francisco (UCSF). (ucsf.edu)
  • In order to utilize the diversity held in NARS (National Agricultural Research Station) and CGIAR (Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research) germplasm collections, one of the GCP's (Generation Challenge Program) premier capacity building activities is to build databases that contain traditional and molecular data on germplasm so that scientists all over the world can access information with relevance to their region on traits, genes, and sequences. (www.gov.uk)
  • Genetic engineering is faster than traditional selective breeding, and can give more precise outcomes because it allows individual genes or small groups of genes to be manipulated. (scidev.net)
  • Over 2500 of these diseases (including a few more common ones) have predictive genetics of sufficiently high clinical impact that they are recommended as medical genetic tests available for single genes (and in whole genome sequencing) and growing at about 200 new genetic diseases per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • At present, the CTGA database is centrally maintained in Dubai, and hosts entries for nearly 1540 Mendelian disorders and related genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • When researching genetic disorders, scientists would only consider genes they already expected to be associated with that disorder-only looking for mutations in BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 for breast cancer, for example. (wikipedia.org)
  • most genetic diseases are caused by multiple genetic factors on multiple genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the strategy of looking only at single genes was ineffective for finding the genetic components of many diseases, and because new technology made the cost of examining a single gene versus doing a genome-wide scan about the same, scientists began collecting much larger amounts of genetic information when any was to be collected at all. (wikipedia.org)
  • genome
  • Because, you're probably aware, we're in the middle of a genetic revolution in terms of the capacity to find gene changes in your genome or my genome. (abc.net.au)
  • The emerging market of direct-to-consumer genome sequencing services has brought new questions about both the medical efficacy and the ethical dilemmas associated with widespread knowledge of individual genetic information. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the same time technological advances also made it possible for wide sharing of information, so when data was collected, many scientists doing genetics work found that access to data from genome-wide scans collected for any one reason would actually be useful in many other types of genetic research. (wikipedia.org)
  • dbSNP accepts submissions for any organism from a wide variety of sources including individual research laboratories, collaborative polymorphism discovery efforts, large scale genome sequencing centers, other SNP databases (e.g. the SNP consortium, HapMap, etc.), and private businesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Condylostoma nuclear code (translation table 28) is a genetic code used by the nuclear genome of the heterotrich ciliate Condylostoma magnum. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Blastocrithidia nuclear code (translation table 31) is a genetic code used by the nuclear genome of the trypanosomatid Blastocrithidia. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • Biobanks intend to focus on gene-environment association using genetic association studies models. (genomicsnetwork.ac.uk)
  • An international database charting gene changes means families previously in the dark about their genetic risk can be offered definitive testing. (abc.net.au)
  • FINLAY MACRAE: Well we ve had breakthroughs in being able to assemble information that is otherwise in hidden corners around the world, either published or unpublished and directing them to a database that we have on the internet to enable an interpretation about the gene changes that s occurred in any one particular family that enables us to confidently say this change causes cancer across the family or it doesn't. (abc.net.au)
  • Please use the links below to access the LOVD database for the gene of interest. (euro-wabb.org)
  • Genotypes
  • In the present study, a fingerprinting database was established containing 134 SSR primers and 2 457 wheat genotypes with the data from CIMMYT and three collaborators: ICARDA, Agropolis, and CAAS. (www.gov.uk)
  • research
  • Genetic databases provide new dimensions and new niches to examine the ethics of different traditions of research and to undertake a comparative analysis in different societies of the world and its implications on global health. (genomicsnetwork.ac.uk)
  • Ethical Issues of Human Genetic Databases: A Challenge to Classical Health Research Ethics? (cambridge.org)
  • In a continuation of a 2014 conference that explored regulatory considerations and strategies for next-generation sequencing, the Friends of Cancer Research, with support from Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc, Pasadena, California, met to discuss the issues and problems of coordinating drug and diagnostic development, specifically the use of curated databases. (ascopost.com)
  • Over the last few years, linguists and computaional linguists have started looking into the possibilities of using multilingual corpora (mainly parallel corpora) for typological and genetic linguistic research. (gu.se)
  • The Act on Health Sector Database, also known as Act on Health Sector Database, No. 139/1998, the Health Sector Database Act and in media by other colloquial names, was a 1998 act of the Icelandic Parliament which allowed the Icelandic government to grant a license to a private company for the creation of a national biological database to store health information which could be used for research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genograms are now used by various groups of people in a variety of fields such as medicine, psychiatry, psychology, social work, genetic research, education, and many more. (wikipedia.org)
  • data
  • The rapid developments in molecular diagnostics and ever expanding wealth of biological data have provoked issues concerning the deciphering, storing, validating, annotating and integrating of information in different kinds of genomic databases. (genomicsnetwork.ac.uk)
  • From this database one can obtain patient based data with respect to patient's Geographical location, Age, Sex, and Ethnic Group. (wikipedia.org)
  • SQL database queries are used to analyze the genetic data, including locating probable significant associations between genotype and phenotype data. (patents.com)
  • The genetic information on more than 78,000 individuals translates into over 55 billion bits of genetic data for the cohort. (ucsf.edu)
  • On the base of the database, a SSR reference kit for wheat genetic diversity analysis was developed, which will facilitate the use of this data in new projects and cross-laboratory comparisons. (www.gov.uk)
  • Whereas before data usually stayed in one laboratory, now scientists began to store large amounts of genetic data in single places for community use and sharing. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • 5) to conduct a small typological or genetic linguistic study as a showcase of the utility of the database and user interface. (gu.se)
  • project
  • The overall objective of this project was to explore the ethical, regulatory and governance issues arising out of the use of genetic databases. (genomicsnetwork.ac.uk)
  • Given the broad reach of the four strands associated with the Databases project, the methodology involved an array of techniques. (genomicsnetwork.ac.uk)
  • The establishment of a national database for all Icelandic citizens raised discussion about the nature of the informed consent process for the project. (wikipedia.org)
  • Goal
  • He started the Million Veterans Program which has a goal of collecting genetic information from veterans and linking that information to the VA electronic health record. (wikipedia.org)
  • individual
  • The empirical work showed that the requirement for individual informed consent does not address wider concerns over the type of society genetic applications could bring about, the commercialization and commodification of information and the privatization of public goods. (genomicsnetwork.ac.uk)
  • identify
  • Instead of spending large sums of money on endless meetings to ensure biosafety under the Cartagena Protocol, we should build the capacity of poor countries to both identify their genetic resources and use them to meet development needs. (scidev.net)
  • worldwide
  • The database and the reference kit will provide a powerful tool for genetic diversity studies of wheat germplasm worldwide. (www.gov.uk)
  • Out of all the national/ethnic mutation databases (NEMDBs), FINDbase has the most content and since all the entries are collected from various populations worldwide, it is seen as a great resource for population-specific information. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • RACHAEL BROWN: This consumer representative for the Cancer Council says the global database will now help countless families make better informed decisions. (abc.net.au)
  • Some genetic tests of born children might help finding the right treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • SHARe represents a major milestone in moving toward an era of personalized health care -- a future in which the ways we prevent, diagnose and treat health problems are tailored to an individual's genetic makeup," U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt said in a prepared statement. (bio-medicine.org)
  • offer
  • Would you offer your genetic information for such a cause? (zdnet.com)
  • Automated high-throughput sequencers have increased the speed and reduced the cost of sequencing, making it possible to offer genetic testing to consumers today[when? (wikipedia.org)