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  • capillary
  • In addition, dermatologic conditions may result in blue skin color that mimics cyanosis in the absence of increased levels of deoxygenated blood in the capillary beds. (uptodate.com)
  • right diagnosis
  • Clearly, it can be a formidable task to reach the right diagnosis in a neonate with central cyanosis. (hindawi.com)
  • Common treatments for cyanosis include medication such as antibiotics and diuretics, warming the body and avoiding cold temperatures, oxygenation, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, states Right Diagnosis. (reference.com)
  • cardiac
  • Location: UNITED STATES , 37 years of age, weighting 135.0 lb, patient began experiencing various side effects, including: Directly after treatment started, patient experienced the unwanted or unexpected Dilaudid side effects: cardiac arrest, cyanosis, heart rate decreased, tachycardia. (patientsville.com)
  • typically
  • Treatment for cyanosis typically includes immediate oxygen therapy along with certain types of medications to aid in breathing: diuretics, antibiotics, or even steroids depending on the underlying cause. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • lungs
  • As with any right-to-left shunt, there is decreased blood flow to the lungs, resulting in decreased oxygenation of blood and cyanosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypoxia
  • Since estimation of hypoxia is usually now based either on arterial blood gas measurement or pulse oximetry, this is probably an overestimate, with evidence that levels of 2.0 g/dL of deoxyhemoglobin may reliably produce cyanosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • When signs of cyanosis first appear, such as on the lips or fingers, intervention should be made within 3-5 minutes because a severe hypoxia or severe circulatory failure may have induced the cyanosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoxia due to low SaO2 is indicated by cyanosis, but oxygen saturation does not directly reflect tissue oxygenation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conditions
  • Cyanosis can also appear at any time later in life and often accompanies conditions in which lung function is compromised (resulting in an inability to fully oxygenate the blood) or conditions in which the heart's pumping function is compromised. (medicinenet.com)
  • birth
  • Cyanosis usually associated with a birth defect, such as stenosis of the pulmonary artery orifice, ventricular septal defect, or a patent foramen ovale or ductus arteriosus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • medical
  • This discoloration is called cyanosis, and is caused by greater than 5 grams per cent of deoxyhemaglobinemia, or 1.5 grams per cent of methemaglobinemia, or 0.5 grams per cent of sulphemaglobinemia, all serious medical abnormalities. (wikipedia.org)