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  • spinal cord
  • The ability of a substrate bound neurotrophic factor to promote growth of ascending sensory axons across a complete transection lesion of the rat spinal cord was examined in a transplantation model. (hindawi.com)
  • Aspiration lesions created a 3 mm long cavity in the upper lumbar spinal cord of adult rats. (hindawi.com)
  • Fetal spinal cord tissue was transplanted alongsideand between these strips. (hindawi.com)
  • Labeled axons were evident along the entire length of the nitrocellulose and appeared to aggregate at the rostral tip of the implant, with many fibers extending into the host spinal cord rostral to the lesion/transplant site. (hindawi.com)
  • These results indicate that substrate bound nerve growth factor has the capacity to enhance the regrowth of ascending sensory axons across a traumatic spinal cord injury site. (hindawi.com)
  • But sometimes childhood brain and spinal cord tumours develop in children who don't have any of the risk factors described below. (cancer.ca)
  • Most childhood brain and spinal cord tumours develop during the first 10 years of life. (cancer.ca)
  • Some children with certain genetic conditions have a higher than average risk for brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • There is convincing evidence that the following factors increase the risk for childhood brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • Both neurofibromatosis type 1 (von Recklinghausen disease, or NF1) and neurofibromatosis type 2 (acoustic neuroma, or NF2) increase the risk for childhood brain and spinal cord cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • It causes non-cancerous tumours to develop in the brain and spinal cord, skin, heart or kidneys. (cancer.ca)
  • It also causes tumours of the brain and spinal cord. (cancer.ca)
  • It causes problems with several organs and increases the risk of developing different types of tumours, including brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • Having a birth defect is a possible risk factor for childhood brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • This means that it has been linked with childhood brain and spinal cord tumours, but there is not enough evidence to show for sure that it is a risk factor. (cancer.ca)
  • HealthDay News) - Patient age, severe neurological impairment, and forced vital capacity (FVC) are useful for predicting the need for tracheostomy in the management of patients with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) in the acute care setting, according to research published online Sept 19 in Spine . (empr.com)
  • Factors predicting publication of spinal cord injury trials registered on www.ClinicalTrials. (iospress.com)
  • OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Treatment options for spinal cord injuries are currently limited, but multiple clinical trials are underway for a variety of interventions, drugs, and devices. (iospress.com)
  • This investigation assesses the factors associated with publication and the publication rate of spinal cord injury trials. (iospress.com)
  • METHODS: The www.ClinicalTrials.gov was queried for all trials on patients with spinal cord injury, and these trials were assessed for status, type of intervention, source of funding, and region. (iospress.com)
  • RESULTS: There were 626 studies identified concerning the treatment of patients with spinal cord injury, of which 250 (39.9%) were completed. (iospress.com)
  • CONCLUSION: The current publication rate of spinal cord injury trials is only 47.6%, though this rate is similar to the publication rate for trials in other fields. (iospress.com)
  • However, it is also likely that many trials on spinal cord injury yield negative results, as treatments are often ineffective. (iospress.com)
  • Shoulder pain in individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) is common and frequently results in chronic debilitating pain recalcitrant to treatment. (ovid.com)
  • To investigate the mortality rate following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) injury and analyze the associated risk factors. (ovid.com)
  • Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in severe neurological deficit. (springer.com)
  • Thus, we aimed to evaluate the combined effect of BMSC transplantation and G-CSF administration on rats with traverse spinal cord injury. (springer.com)
  • Compared with the control, BMSC, and G-CSF groups, less expression of apoptosis cells and more neural-cell markers around the spinal cord injury were found in rats treated with G-CSF + BMSCs. (springer.com)
  • This synergistic effect between BMSCs and G-CSF may be attributed to extrinsic and endogenous neurogenesis in the traverse spinal cord injury. (springer.com)
  • The authors demonstrate that, in a rat model, a combination of bone marrow stromal cells and growth factor can improve the functional and histological outcome after spinal cord injury. (springer.com)
  • Akiyama Y, Radtke C, Honmou O, Kocsis JD (2002) Remyelination of the spinal cord following intravenous delivery of bone marrow cells. (springer.com)
  • Ankeny DP, McTigue DM, Jakeman LB (2004) Bone marrow transplants provide tissue protection and directional guidance for axons after contusive spinal cord injury in rats. (springer.com)
  • Weber, K., Dalmotas, D., and Hendrick, B., "Investigation of Dummy Response and Restraint Configuration Factors Associated with Upper Spinal Cord Injury in a Forward-Facing Child Restraint," SAE Technical Paper 933101, 1993, https://doi.org/10.4271/933101 . (sae.org)
  • Dummy response and restraint configuration factors associated with a known child injury environment were investigated using a spinal-cord injury accident case, a full-scale reconstruction, and sled simulations. (sae.org)
  • The case occupant had been facing forward and had sustained a contusion of the spinal cord at T2 that resulted in paraplegia. (sae.org)
  • Home / Test Division / Reference Database / 2010 to 2017 / 2013 / Psychological risk factors for poor outcome of spine surgery and spinal cord stimulator. (umn.edu)
  • In vivo and in vitro characterization of novel neuronal plasticity factors identified following spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • nonchord tone
  • In harmony , the consonance and dissonance of a chord factor and a nonchord tone are distinguished, respectively. (wn.com)
  • A nonchord tone (NCT), nonharmonic tone, or embellishing tone is a note (i.e., a pitch) in a piece of music or song that is not part of the implied or expressed chord set out by the harmonic framework. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, if an excerpt from a piece of music implies or uses a C major chord, then notes C, E and G are members of that chord, while any other note played at that time (e.g., notes such as F♯) is a nonchord tone. (wikipedia.org)
  • A neighbor tone (NT) or auxiliary note (AUX) is a nonchord tone that passes stepwise from a chord tone directly above or below it (which frequently causes the NT to create dissonance with the chord) and resolves to the same chord tone: In practice and analysis, neighboring tones are sometimes differentiated depending upon whether or not they are lower or higher than the chord tones surrounding them. (wikipedia.org)
  • A passing tone (PT) or passing note is a nonchord tone prepared by a chord tone a step above or below it and resolved by continuing in the same direction stepwise to the next chord tone (which is either part of the same chord or of the next chord in the harmonic progression). (wikipedia.org)
  • next chord
  • The term is borrowed from the contrapuntal technique of suspension, where a note from a previous chord is carried over to the next chord, and then resolved down to the third or tonic, suspending a note from the previous chord. (wikipedia.org)
  • dissonant
  • While consonance and dissonance exist only between sounds and therefore necessarily describe intervals (or chords), such as the perfect intervals, which are often viewed as consonant (e.g., the unison and octave), Occidental music theory often considers that, in a dissonant chord, one of the tones alone is in itself deemed to be the dissonance: it is this tone in particular that needs "resolution" through a specific voice leading procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most nonharmonic tones are dissonant and create intervals of a second, fourth or seventh", which are required to resolve to a chord tone in conventional ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Augmented and diminished intervals are also considered dissonant, and all nonharmonic tones are measured from the bass, or lowest note sounding in the chord except in the case of nonharmonic bass tones. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dissonant (B, 7th degree of the C Major scale) in bar 1 is approached by step and resolves when that same pitch becomes a chord tone in bar 2. (wikipedia.org)
  • transplantation
  • Use of umbilical unrelated cord-blood (UCB) cells as an alternative source of hematopoietic cell transplantation has been widely used mainly for patients lacking an HLA-matched donor. (hindawi.com)
  • The identification of prognostic factors associated with engraftment that can be easily modified (e.g., strategies for donor choice) and the development of new approaches including use of multiple donors, intrabone injection of UCB, ex vivo expansion, and cotransplantation with accessory cells are of crucial importance in order to circumvent the problem of delayed engraftment after UCB transplantation. (hindawi.com)
  • Many prognostic studies for improving engraftment after UCB transplantation have been performed, analyzing factors related to patients, disease, donor, and transplantation [ 5 , 19 - 25 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • This paper will focus on risk factors affecting engraftment after UCB transplantation and on procedures aiming to guide clinicians to avoid graft failure following UCB transplantation. (hindawi.com)
  • Cord blood transplantation (CBT) from an unrelated donor has been increasingly used as an alternative transplant method for adult patients without human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-compatible related or unrelated donors. (haematologica.org)
  • voicings
  • Theorists - or practical music teachers - writing of chordioids usually go so far as to advise that students learn them in the practical manner of chords generally: in all transpositions, ranges, permutations, and voicings, for reading, writing, and playing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Joseph Schillinger based his theory of chordioids off the above as well as those irregular voicings of 7th chords in which the 5th is present but the 3rd absent, and of 9th chords in which the 5th and 3rd are both absent. (wikipedia.org)
  • tones
  • Chordioids is related also to upper structures as a technique insofar as upper structures represent groups of notes not commonly taken to be "legitimate" chords, but differs in that chordioids as a technique uses a priori structures held in common rather than a free selection of color tones appropriate for a lower integral chord. (wikipedia.org)
  • While it is theoretically possible that for a three-note chord there are (in equal temperament) nine possible nonchord tones, nonchord tones are usually in the prevailing key. (wikipedia.org)
  • A neighboring tone that is a step higher than the surrounding chord tones is called an upper neighboring tone or an upper auxiliary note while a neighboring tone that is a step lower than the surrounding chord tones is a lower neighboring tone or lower auxiliary note. (wikipedia.org)
  • functional
  • The potential to reestablish functional contacts across such a lesion may be heightened by the ability of neurotrophic factors to promote more extensive axonal regrowth. (hindawi.com)
  • slash
  • Chordioids is related to slash chords as a technique insofar as known chords may be used as chordioids to create resultant scales, but differs in that chordioids used are not exclusively known chords. (wikipedia.org)
  • Growth Factor
  • A gene on chromosome 4q32 that encodes platelet-derived growth factor C, a growth factor which plays a key role in regulating embryonic development and in cell proliferation, migration, survival and chemotaxis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Retrospective
  • Itaru Yugué, MD, PhD, of the Spinal Injuries Center in Iizuka, Japan, and colleagues conducted a retrospective, consecutive case study involving 319 patients with CSCI to determine risk factors associated with the need for tracheostomy in the acute care setting. (empr.com)
  • passes
  • A chord that passes through a circle's center point is the circle's diameter. (wn.com)
  • A chord that passes through the center of a circle is called a diameter, and is the longest chord. (wn.com)
  • degree
  • In the second century AD, Ptolemy of Alexandria compiled a more extensive table of chords in his book on astronomy , giving the value of the chord for angles ranging from 1/2 degree to 180 degrees by increments of half a degree. (wn.com)
  • Major
  • Degrees are useful for indicating the size of intervals and chords, and whether they are major or minor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following table shows the resultant chord for some of the possible added notes: Robert Rawlins based his theory of chordioids off the above as well as permutations of other major and minor 7th chords. (wikipedia.org)
  • A suspended chord (or sus chord) is a musical chord in which the (major or minor) third is omitted, replaced usually with either a perfect fourth ( play (help·info)) or a major second ( play (help·info)), although the fourth is far more common. (wikipedia.org)
  • modifiable
  • Most of the risk factors are not modifiable. (cancer.ca)
  • Modifiable factors have been identified, such as HLA, cell dose, and others related to the graft choice or factors related to conditioning regimen [ 26 ] or GVHD prophylaxis [ 27 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • typically
  • In the field of astronomy the term chord typically refers to a line crossing an object which is formed during an occultation event. (wn.com)
  • 1971
  • Carole King's song "I feel the Earth move" from her album Tapestry (1971) features a striking B♭sus9 chord at the end of the phrase "mellow as the month of May. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skip
  • An escape tone (ET) or echappée is a particular type of unaccented incomplete neighbor tone that is approached stepwise from a chord tone and resolved by a skip in the opposite direction back to the harmony. (wikipedia.org)
  • function
  • The function of cord factor is highly dependent on what environment it is located, and therefore its conformation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first known trigonometric table, compiled by Hipparchus , tabulated the value of the chord function for every 7.5 degrees . (wn.com)
  • A chord is a function body that is associated with multiple function headers and cannot execute until all function headers are called. (wn.com)
  • 8. Effect of derivatives and chemical analogues of cord factor on structure and function of mouse liver mitochondria: M. Kato, et al. (adipogen.com)
  • vivo
  • In vivo pulmonary granuloma formation in mice can be induced by 10μg Cord Factor per mouse applied i.v. in a water/oil/water emulsion. (adipogen.com)
  • generally
  • More generally, a chord is a line segment joining two points on any curve, for instance an ellipse . (wn.com)
  • Risk factors are generally listed in order from most to least important. (cancer.ca)
  • It is possible to have the third with a sus chord, the third being generally voiced above the fourth (i.e. as a tenth), though this is not absolutely necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • tracheostomy
  • In conclusion, a high age, severe American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale, and low FVC (percent VC) were all considered to be independent risk factors for the need of tracheostomy in patients with CSCI," the authors write. (empr.com)
  • Early tracheostomy should therefore be considered in patients with these risk factors because it may facilitate pulmonary care. (empr.com)
  • The risk factors associated with mortality were age, tracheostomy, and an ASIA impairment scale of A, the latter had the highest risk. (ovid.com)
  • scale
  • When analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression model, an ASIA impairment scale of A was a significant risk factor for mortality. (ovid.com)
  • risk
  • Most cancers are the result of many risk factors. (cancer.ca)
  • Until we learn more about these risk factors, there are no specific ways you can reduce a child's risk. (cancer.ca)
  • Ionizing radiation is a known risk factor for cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • Our objectives were to identify the risk factors associated with shoulder pain in the TSCI population. (ovid.com)
  • third
  • In modern jazz, a third can be added to the chord voicing, as long as it is above the fourth. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example of having the third with a sus chord would be to have the root doubled below middle C (C4), using G2 and G3, played with the left hand, and using the right hand (from the bottom up) middle C (suspended 4th), F, A, and B (the third). (wikipedia.org)
  • Chord factors include 1-♭7-9-11 or 1-4-♭7-9, not 1-4-5 (a sus4 chord with no third). (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • The Italian augmented 6th chord (It+6) is one example, from which proceed the French augmented 6th chord (Fr+6) and German augmented 6th chord (Gr+6) by addition of one note. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another example can be found in the piece "One Short Day", part of the Wicked musical by Stephen Schwartz, which starts with a descending arpeggio of a suspended chord. (wikipedia.org)
  • added tone
  • in a suspended chord the added tone does not necessarily resolve, and is not necessarily "prepared" (i.e., held over) from the prior chord. (wikipedia.org)