• spinal cord
  • But sometimes childhood brain and spinal cord tumours develop in children who don't have any of the risk factors described below. (cancer.ca)
  • Most childhood brain and spinal cord tumours develop during the first 10 years of life. (cancer.ca)
  • Some children with certain genetic conditions have a higher than average risk for brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • There is convincing evidence that the following factors increase the risk for childhood brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • Both neurofibromatosis type 1 (von Recklinghausen disease, or NF1) and neurofibromatosis type 2 (acoustic neuroma, or NF2) increase the risk for childhood brain and spinal cord cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • It causes non-cancerous tumours to develop in the brain and spinal cord, skin, heart or kidneys. (cancer.ca)
  • It also causes tumours of the brain and spinal cord. (cancer.ca)
  • It causes problems with several organs and increases the risk of developing different types of tumours, including brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • Having a birth defect is a possible risk factor for childhood brain and spinal cord tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • This means that it has been linked with childhood brain and spinal cord tumours, but there is not enough evidence to show for sure that it is a risk factor. (cancer.ca)
  • HealthDay News) - Patient age, severe neurological impairment, and forced vital capacity (FVC) are useful for predicting the need for tracheostomy in the management of patients with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) in the acute care setting, according to research published online Sept 19 in Spine . (empr.com)
  • Weber, K., Dalmotas, D., and Hendrick, B., "Investigation of Dummy Response and Restraint Configuration Factors Associated with Upper Spinal Cord Injury in a Forward-Facing Child Restraint," SAE Technical Paper 933101, 1993, https://doi.org/10.4271/933101 . (sae.org)
  • Dummy response and restraint configuration factors associated with a known child injury environment were investigated using a spinal-cord injury accident case, a full-scale reconstruction, and sled simulations. (sae.org)
  • The case occupant had been facing forward and had sustained a contusion of the spinal cord at T2 that resulted in paraplegia. (sae.org)
  • Home / Test Division / Reference Database / 2010 to 2017 / 2013 / Psychological risk factors for poor outcome of spine surgery and spinal cord stimulator. (umn.edu)
  • Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects approximately 17,000 Americans each year. (stanford.edu)
  • After spinal cord injury, proliferating astrocytes not only represent a physical barrier to regenerating axons but also express and secrete molecules that inhibit nerve growth, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). (jneurosci.org)
  • Here we show that rats subjected to weight-drop spinal cord injury can be effectively treated by direct delivery of a potent EGFR inhibitor to the injured area, leading to significantly better functional and structural outcome. (jneurosci.org)
  • The robust effects and the fact that other EGFR inhibitors are in clinical use in cancer treatments make these drugs particularly attractive candidates for clinical trials in spinal cord injury. (jneurosci.org)
  • Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically results in neurological dysfunction that cannot be reversed. (jneurosci.org)
  • Here we demonstrate robust beneficial effects of local infusion of an irreversible EGFR inhibitor onto the damaged area of the spinal cord on recovery from contusion spinal cord injury in rats. (jneurosci.org)
  • The observed effects and the fact that other EGFR inhibitors are in clinical use for the treatment of certain lung cancers may help pave the way for clinical trials of EGFR inhibition in spinal cord injury. (jneurosci.org)
  • However, the role of SIRT1 in spinal cord injury (SCI) is unknown. (jneurosci.org)
  • In vivo and in vitro characterization of novel neuronal plasticity factors identified following spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • voicings
  • In real applications, it is common practice to omit the eleventh from voicings of a dominant 13 chord, because though being necessary to theoretically derive the thirteenth by stacking on it, the unaltered perfect eleventh clashes with the major third. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theorists - or practical music teachers - writing of chordioids usually go so far as to advise that students learn them in the practical manner of chords generally: in all transpositions, ranges, permutations, and voicings, for reading, writing, and playing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Joseph Schillinger based his theory of chordioids off the above as well as those irregular voicings of 7th chords in which the 5th is present but the 3rd absent, and of 9th chords in which the 5th and 3rd are both absent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chords occasionally lapse into suspended chord voicings as a result of Cobain playing the bottom four strings of the guitar for the thickness of sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • umbilical cord
  • Relationship between 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels in placental/umbilical cord blood and maternal/neonatal obstetric factors. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Robust and large-scale expansion of umbilical cord blood stem cells in vitro is necessary for widening the usage of transplantation therapies for the treatment of hematological and immune diseases. (epfl.ch)
  • next chord
  • The term is borrowed from the contrapuntal technique of suspension, where a note from a previous chord is carried over to the next chord, and then resolved down to the third or tonic, suspending a note from the previous chord. (wikipedia.org)
  • dissonant
  • While consonance and dissonance exist only between sounds and therefore necessarily describe intervals (or chords), such as the perfect intervals, which are often viewed as consonant (e.g., the unison and octave), Occidental music theory often considers that, in a dissonant chord, one of the tones alone is in itself deemed to be the dissonance: it is this tone in particular that needs "resolution" through a specific voice leading procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most nonharmonic tones are dissonant and create intervals of a second, fourth or seventh", which are required to resolve to a chord tone in conventional ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Augmented and diminished intervals are also considered dissonant, and all nonharmonic tones are measured from the bass, or lowest note sounding in the chord except in the case of nonharmonic bass tones. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dissonant (B, 7th degree of the C Major scale) in bar 1 is approached by step and resolves when that same pitch becomes a chord tone in bar 2. (wikipedia.org)
  • tones
  • Chordioids is related also to upper structures as a technique insofar as upper structures represent groups of notes not commonly taken to be "legitimate" chords, but differs in that chordioids as a technique uses a priori structures held in common rather than a free selection of color tones appropriate for a lower integral chord. (wikipedia.org)
  • While it is theoretically possible that for a three-note chord there are (in equal temperament) nine possible nonchord tones, nonchord tones are usually in the prevailing key. (wikipedia.org)
  • A neighboring tone that is a step higher than the surrounding chord tones is called an upper neighboring tone or an upper auxiliary note while a neighboring tone that is a step lower than the surrounding chord tones is a lower neighboring tone or lower auxiliary note. (wikipedia.org)
  • strains
  • 16 ). These authors compared the virulent H37Rv and avirulent H37Ra M. tuberculosis strains and found that the formation of cords took place only in the virulent strain, whereas cells from the avirulent H37Ra strain were not oriented and merely formed irregular clumps. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • slash
  • Chordioids is related to slash chords as a technique insofar as known chords may be used as chordioids to create resultant scales, but differs in that chordioids used are not exclusively known chords. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dominant 9sus4 has a perfect fourth rather than a major third and is called a sus4 chord rather than an 11th, though it may also be called a slash chord (G9sus4 = F/G). [G9sus4 = GCDFA = F/G = GFAC] It may even be written Dm7/G, which shows the merging of ii7 and V7. (wikipedia.org)
  • virulent
  • Cord factor is virulent towards mammalian cells and critical for survival of M. tuberculosis in hosts, but not outside of hosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • A large quantity of cord factor is found in virulent M. tuberculosis, but not in avirulent M. tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unfortunately, despite the knowledge obtained, the factors that make M. tuberculosis virulent have not yet been identified ( 23 , 29 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • therefore
  • The function of cord factor is highly dependent on what environment it is located, and therefore its conformation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early tracheostomy should therefore be considered in patients with these risk factors because it may facilitate pulmonary care. (empr.com)
  • Therefore, I propose an alternative strategy to encourage host tissue regeneration through the delivery of synthetic "cells" that have been bioengineered to withstand injection forces that can cause cell death, as well as release important growth factors necessary for regeneration in a controlled manner. (stanford.edu)
  • Therefore, SIRT1 is not only a protective factor but also an anti-inflammatory molecule that exerts beneficial effects on locomotor function after SCI. (jneurosci.org)
  • Therefore, questions such as "How does mycobacterial cord formation occur? (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • receptor
  • Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation triggers astrocytes into becoming reactive astrocytes, and EGFR ligands stimulate the secretion of CSPGs as well as the formation of cribriform astrocyte arrangements that contribute to the formation of glial scars. (jneurosci.org)
  • functional
  • Finally, in aim 3, I will determine the optimal growth factor release profiles from delivered synthetic "cells" for native tissue regeneration and functional recovery in a rat model of cervical, contusion SCI. (stanford.edu)
  • major
  • Dominant chords are very important in music because for the past 500 years, they function as one of the most important chords in any given key (be it a major or minor key). (hearandplay.com)
  • Degrees are useful for indicating the size of intervals and chords, and whether they are major or minor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following table shows the resultant chord for some of the possible added notes: Robert Rawlins based his theory of chordioids off the above as well as permutations of other major and minor 7th chords. (wikipedia.org)
  • A suspended chord (or sus chord) is a musical chord in which the (major or minor) third is omitted, replaced usually with either a perfect fourth ( play (help·info)) or a major second ( play (help·info)), although the fourth is far more common. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro
  • The second aim is to both determine the release profile of loaded growth factors from the synthetic "cells", as well as use an in vitro screening assay to determine the optimal growth factor combination to promote enhanced neurite growth. (stanford.edu)
  • The development of a mathematical model of in vitro hematopoiesis coupled with gene expression profiling led to predictions about the secreted factors that play a crucial role in regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal in culture. (epfl.ch)
  • anti-inflammatory
  • They stated: " We have succeeded in isolating a crystalline anti-inflammatory factor from soybean lecithin and identifying it as (S)-(2-hydroxyethyl)-palmitamide. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1971
  • Carole King's song "I feel the Earth move" from her album Tapestry (1971) features a striking B♭sus9 chord at the end of the phrase "mellow as the month of May. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus
  • The new name and concept, "master chord", thus does not imply either jazz derivation, completeness of the sonority as an independent chord, nor connection to other use as a chord of dominant function. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem cells
  • Loïc Reppel and his colleagues at CNRS-Université de Lorraine in France have found that mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord can not only be induced to make cartilage, but that these remarkable cells can make cartilage without the use of exogenous growth factors. (wordpress.com)
  • However
  • However, it is likely that the mycolic acids of cord factor must undergo a cyclopropyl modification to lead to a response from the host's immune system for initial infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, no significant correlation was observed between 8-OHdG levels and other maternal/ neonatal factors, including umbilical artery acid/base and gas values. (biomedsearch.com)
  • However, 56 years after Bloch's description, we know that TDM is not the cording factor, as multiple alterations in cell envelopes unrelated to TDM can lead to loss of cording (see reference 8 for an excellent review). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • scale
  • In conclusion, a high age, severe American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale, and low FVC (percent VC) were all considered to be independent risk factors for the need of tracheostomy in patients with CSCI," the authors write. (empr.com)
  • It is the scale and intervallic relationship between the collection of three or more notes that determine if a chord is formed or not. (hearandplay.com)
  • known
  • The exact chemical mechanisms by which cord factor acts is not completely known. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionizing radiation is a known risk factor for cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • Chordioids as a technique is related to polychords insofar as polychords are the result of an additive process, but differs in that the basis of polychords is the addition of two known chords. (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • The Italian augmented 6th chord (It+6) is one example, from which proceed the French augmented 6th chord (Fr+6) and German augmented 6th chord (Gr+6) by addition of one note. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example of having the third with a sus chord would be to have the root doubled below middle C (C4), using G2 and G3, played with the left hand, and using the right hand (from the bottom up) middle C (suspended 4th), F, A, and B (the third). (wikipedia.org)
  • Another example can be found in the piece "One Short Day", part of the Wicked musical by Stephen Schwartz, which starts with a descending arpeggio of a suspended chord. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • Itaru Yugué, MD, PhD, of the Spinal Injuries Center in Iizuka, Japan, and colleagues conducted a retrospective, consecutive case study involving 319 patients with CSCI to determine risk factors associated with the need for tracheostomy in the acute care setting. (empr.com)
  • different
  • It is typical of chordioids that many different resultant chords can be created from the same base depending on the note or combination of notes added. (wikipedia.org)
  • harmony
  • An escape tone (ET) or echappée is a particular type of unaccented incomplete neighbor tone that is approached stepwise from a chord tone and resolved by a skip in the opposite direction back to the harmony. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthetic
  • The first aim of this proposal will be to synthesize and characterize the designed synthetic "cells" to be used for growth factor release. (stanford.edu)
  • added tone
  • in a suspended chord the added tone does not necessarily resolve, and is not necessarily "prepared" (i.e., held over) from the prior chord. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Then Reppel and others compared the chondrogenic differentiation of WJ-MSC in these three-dimensional scaffolds, without adding growth factors with BM-MSC. (wordpress.com)
  • Small molecule-mediated inhibition of the downstream signaling pathways activated by VEGF, PDGF, and EGF led to a decreased expansion of primitive cell compartments, confirming the endogenous activity of these growth factors for the stimulation of blood stem and progenitor cells. (epfl.ch)
  • notes
  • A chord is a collection of three or more related notes (agreeable or not) that are played [or heard] together. (hearandplay.com)
  • Although a chord can be understood as a collection of three or more notes, what matters most is the relationship between its notes. (hearandplay.com)
  • Summarily, it is the relationship between three or more notes that determine if a chord is produced or not. (hearandplay.com)
  • A chordioid, also called chord fragment or fragmentary voicing or partial voicing, is a group of musical notes which does not qualify as a chord under some preferred chord theory or other, but still useful to name and reify for other reasons. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main use of chordioids is to form "legitimate" chords enharmonically in 12TET by adding one or more notes to this base. (wikipedia.org)