• stimulus
  • A recruitment model for choice behavior (1962, 1994) assumes that processing a stimulus involves the recruiting (or accumulation) of elements by alternative response counters until a criterion number is reached and the corresponding response is evoked. (wikipedia.org)
  • The subject is presented with two alternative options, only one of which contains the target stimulus, and is forced to choose which one was the correct option. (wikipedia.org)
  • The objective threshold is found using a forced choice procedure, in which participants must choose which stimulus they saw from options given to them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Participants are flashed a stimulus (e.g. the word "orange") and then given a few choices and asked which one they saw. (wikipedia.org)
  • An indirect effect is an uninstructed effect of the task stimulus on behavior, sometimes measured by including an irrelevant or distracting component in the task stimulus and measuring its effect on accuracy. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1994
  • In 2006, Dr. Christopher R. Wolfe documented the history of the Society for Computers in Psychology in Behavior Research Methods: SCiP history may be divided into three eras: the Paleozoic (1971-1982), the Mesozoic (1982-1994), and the Cenozoic (1994-present). (wikipedia.org)
  • Dynamics
  • Jinzi Zheng, Jun Liu, and David B. Clarke, "Ticket Fare Optimization for China's High-Speed Railway Based on Passenger Choice Behavior," Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society , vol. 2017, Article ID 6237642, 6 pages, 2017. (hindawi.com)
  • There are various manipulations in the design of the task, engineered to test specific behavioral dynamics of choice. (wikipedia.org)
  • and a new generation of land-use models such as LEAM and UrbanSim has developed since the 1990s that depart from these aggregate models, and incorporate innovations in discrete choice modeling, microsimulation, dynamics, and geographic information systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Luce's
  • In probability theory, Luce's choice axiom, formulated by R. Duncan Luce (1959), states that the probability of selecting one item over another from a pool of many items is not affected by the presence or absence of other items in the pool. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scholarpedia article Luce's Choice Axiom Luce, R. D. (1959). (wikipedia.org)
  • Contributions for which Luce is known include formulating Luce's choice axiom formalizing the principle that additional options should not affect the probability of selecting one item over another, defining semiorders, introducing graph-theoretic methods into the social sciences, and coining the term "clique" for a complete subgraph in graph theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • regard
  • Factors that influence consumer decision process It is evident that consumers in our modern world continually face multiple decisions with regard to product choice due to many competing products, such aspects as a products attributes have been shown to be involved in the consumer decision process (Catalin & Andreea, 2014). (wikipedia.org)
  • These effects are particularly apparent, and compelling, with regard to behaviors affecting health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychology
  • As someone with many years of taking multiple-choice tests as well as a fair amount of experience writing them, I thought it was time to talk about the psychology behind them as well as offer tips to successfully taking them. (brainybehavior.com)
  • Konečni has conducted laboratory and field studies of human emotion and (physical and verbal) aggression, as well as of altruistic behavior, which have been cited in numerous social psychology textbooks. (wikipedia.org)
  • consumers
  • The multinomial logit model is frequently used in marketing research to explain consumers' brand choice decisions. (repec.org)
  • In contrast to this assumption, both marketing theory and statements from marketing practitioners suggest the possibility of short-term fluctuations and long-term changes in consumers' brand choice behavior. (repec.org)
  • ABSTRACT - A process model of consumer post-choice response behavior is developed from four components which include the type of post-choice response, as the dependent variable, and as the independent variables, attribution of the cause of satisfaction/ dissatisfaction, the subjective probability of a successful response, the expected consequences of a response, and the characteristics of individual consumers. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Consumers are known to choose a brand that is acceptable to their self-image that they are trying to portray. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within these three processes lifestyle of the consumer also becomes intertwined with consumers tending to choose a brand they feel is congruent with their self- image, their identity - who they feel they are and what they connect with the most. (wikipedia.org)
  • mates
  • My adult book, SEXUAL STRATEGIES: HOW FEMALES CHOOSE THEIR MATES, has an updated edition through the Authors Guild Back in Print program with iUniverse.com. (blogspot.com)
  • make
  • When we think we're being watched, we make behavior choices that we believe o. (c3o.org)
  • When we think we're being watched, we make behavior choices that we believe other people want us to make. (c3o.org)
  • In most experiments, the participant must make a choice response between two directions of motion (e.g. up or down), usually indicated by a motor response such as a saccade or pressing a button. (wikipedia.org)
  • While EUT has dominated the analysis of decision-making under risk and has generally been accepted as a normative model of rational choice (telling us how we should make decisions), descriptive models of how people actually behave deviate significantly from this normative model. (wikipedia.org)
  • By determining the beliefs a person holds regarding his or her power to affect situations, it strongly influences both the power a person actually has to face challenges competently and the choices a person is most likely to make. (wikipedia.org)
  • model
  • J. D. Forbes, David S. Tse, and Shirley Taylor (1986) ,"Towards a Model of Consumer Post-Choice Response Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. (acrwebsite.org)
  • The major elements of the model developed in this paper is a vector of post-choice responses as the dependent variable, the attribution of the source of satisfaction or dissatisfaction, the subjective probability of a successful response, the expected consequences of a particular-response, and an individual's predisposition to respond. (acrwebsite.org)
  • A model for neutral elements (1959a, b) provided a way to represent noise elements in the Estes and Burke (1953) choice theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analysis
  • A 2005 meta-analysis of 9 studies (7 US, one Germany, one Finland) about what adults regret most concluded, that overall adults regret choices regarding their education the most. (wikipedia.org)
  • influence
  • Marketing attribution provides a level of understanding of what combination of events in what particular order influence individuals to engage in a desired behavior, typically referred to as a conversion. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is supported by a study in which immediate surrounding commercials have an influence on people choice behavior without consideration of product merits. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • In his book, Social Evolution , biologist Robert Trivers pointed out that female choice "is not just a matter of permitting sex. (blogspot.com)
  • As individuals have different identities based on their personal experiences, choices or background (including social class, ethnicity or culture), an organisation must understand to whom it directs its brand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lifestyle brands operate off the idea that each individual has an identity based on their choices, experiences, and background (e.g. ethnicity, social class, subculture, nationality, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • options
  • Both options can be presented concurrently or sequentially in two intervals (also known as two-interval forced choice, 2IFC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Japanese
  • She also contributes articles on human nature and sexual behavior through Japanese newspapers and magazines. (nii.ac.jp)
  • known
  • Conversely, the rejection of a sure thing in favor of a gamble of lower or equal expected value is known as risk-seeking behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • experience
  • Food Power Adventure is the kind of active learning experience students need to help them see how the food they choose gives them the energy they need to play and grow," said Tracy Minnis, nutrition program associate with the University of Missouri Extension. (chillicothenews.com)
  • Two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) is a method for measuring the subjective experience of a person or animal through their pattern of choices and response times. (wikipedia.org)
  • Field
  • a) Peafowl study : Field study of peafowl mating behavior was conducted in Izu Cactus Park, Shizuoka Prefecture. (nii.ac.jp)
  • In the period 1972-1984, Konečni carried out, in parallel, field experiments on altruistic behavior, and laboratory and field studies on human physical and verbal aggression. (wikipedia.org)
  • paper
  • In this paper, nonparametric brand-specific time-variable functions replace the brand-specific constants usually found in brand choice models. (repec.org)
  • another
  • The term 2AFC is often mistakenly used for describing the more common yes-no task, where a subject is presented with one option only and is forced to choose whether it belongs to one or another category. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long
  • Long and Short Range Criteria for Housing Choice and Environmental Behavior. (ed.gov)
  • Expectations of self-efficacy determine whether an individual will be able to exhibit coping behavior and how long effort will be sustained in the face of obstacles. (wikipedia.org)
  • task
  • The length of presentation that causes chance performance on the forced choice task is used later in the study for the subliminal stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • That was a fairly straightforward and simple example but testing in that manner (i.e., indirectly) overcomes some of the shortcomings of multiple-choice tests - it requires some reasoning and abstraction. (brainybehavior.com)
  • gives
  • As the sensory input which constitutes the evidence is noisy, the accumulation to the threshold is stochastic rather than deterministic - this gives rise to the directed random walk-like behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • alternative
  • Patients suffering from alcohol dependence no longer have the freedom to choose between alternative rewards because alcohol drinking dictates what should be done next, namely, shaping activities for the next drink. (sciencemag.org)
  • 3 ) demonstrate that aberrant choice behavior-that is, choosing alcohol over an alternative reward-is a key driver for the transition from controlled to compulsive alcohol use. (sciencemag.org)
  • Consider the choice between a prospect that offers an 85% chance to win $1000 (with a 15% chance to win nothing) and the alternative of receiving $800 for sure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to EUT, PT is posited as an alternative theory of choice, in which value is assigned to gains and losses rather than to final assets (total wealth), and in which probabilities are replaced by decision weights. (wikipedia.org)
  • person
  • Process regret may occur, if a person does not consider information about all available choices before making a decision. (wikipedia.org)
  • Decision
  • Regret is a negative conscious and emotional reaction to one's personal decision-making, a choice resulting in action or inaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • effect
  • This research reports the results of an experiment examining the effect of time pressure, perceived risk and accountability on people's choice of cues perceived as high in predictive value and low in confidence value versus cues perceived as low in predictive value and high in confidence value. (illinois.edu)
  • The complex effect of illumination, temperature, and thermal acclimation on habitat choice and. (deepdyve.com)
  • The first, the compromise effect, states that objects that are priced in the middle of choice sets are looked on more favorably. (wikipedia.org)