• 1847
  • In 1847, the Edinburgh obstetrician James Young Simpson experimented with chloroform narcosis on himself, then began using it as an anesthetic to assist women during childbirth. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The Frenchman Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens (1794-1867) noted the anesthetic, but toxic, effect of chloroform on animals in March 1847. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Sir James Young Simpson, an eminent Scottish obstetrician, introduced the medical use of chloroform as an anesthetic in Edinburgh , Scotland , in November 1847. (encyclopedia.com)
  • On the evening of November 4,1847, Simpson and two doctor friends inhaled some chloroform and, after feeling very happy and talkative, promptly passed out. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Chloroform (which was first used in 1847) used on its own produces myocardial depression, however the excitatory properties of the alcohol and ether contained with the choloroform in the A.C.E. mixture was believed to reduce this. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 4 November 1847, they decided to try a ponderous material named chloroform that had been used to anaethestise large animals since 1842 by Robert Mortimer Glover, but had been deemed unsafe for human use. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methyl
  • 1,1,1-trichloro-2-methyl-2-propanol (trichlorobutanol, herein referred to as 'TCB') has a melting point of 77*C. I dissolved 25 grams of it in 100 mL of chloroform (at room temp). (bio.net)
  • compounds
  • Oxygen-gas mixtures (oxygen with nitrous oxide, for example) regained use in anesthesia after 1900, and chloroform was replaced by safer compounds after about 1940. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Environmental Protection Agency recently promulgated interim regulations requiring the reduction of trihalomethane compounds to 100 μg/I as chloroform or below in many public drinking water supplies. (asce.org)
  • Many people in the area of Price Landfill own residential wells, which were found to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds, including benzene & chloroform, and arsenic in 1980. (wikipedia.org)
  • apparatus
  • One of the members, Joseph Clover, during his time on the committee developed apparatus for using chloroform called the Clover bag. (wikipedia.org)
  • They also deemed these inhalers suitable for giving accurate measures of chloroform: Snow's Inhaler Charrière's Inhaler Duroy's Anaesthesiometer Junker's Inhaler (modified by Krohne and others) Clover's Chloroform Inhaler Paul Bert's Apparatus Dubois's Machine Harcourt's Regulator Roth-Dräger Levy's Inhaler Waller's Wick Inhaler Waller's Balance Inhaler Collingwood's Inhaler Shearer, WM. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990
  • 1990). Chloroform concentrations in exhaled breath were measured in six human subjects before and after a normal shower, and following inhalation-only shower exposure. (umn.edu)
  • anesthesia
  • Chloroform was one of the first inhaled anesthetics to be used during surgery, but it is not used for anesthesia today. (cdc.gov)
  • chemical
  • Chloroform enters the environment from chemical companies and paper mills. (cdc.gov)
  • In carbon-13 NMR, the sole carbon deuterated chloroform shows a triplet at a chemical shift of 77 ppm with the three peaks being about equal size, as the deuterium has a spin of 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • This page provides supplementary chemical data on chloroform. (wikipedia.org)
  • Harcourt chloroform regulator Harcourt pentane-air lamp 1863: Fellow of the Royal Society 1865-1873: Secretary of the Chemical Society 1895: President of the Chemical Society "Academic Genealogy of the NDSU Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • alcohol
  • One doctor described using equal parts alcohol and chloroform in minor operations, but chloroform with Eau de Cologne (which has a high alcohol content) in dental procedures for a more pleasant experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • lipids
  • However, I was examining the relationship between lipids and atherosclerosis [the furring up of arteries] and it just so happened that the lipids I was using were supplied already dissolved in chloroform. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Phenol-chloroform extraction is a liquid-liquid extraction technique in molecular biology used to purify nucleic acids and eliminate proteins and lipids. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • There is no data from studies in humans that are adequate to assess the potential carcinogenicity of chloroform to humans. (umn.edu)
  • A study on dermal and inhalation absorption of chloroform by humans during showering was conducted by Jo et al. (umn.edu)
  • These data indicate that humans absorb chloroform by both the dermal and inhalation routes (U.S. EPA, 1994d). (umn.edu)
  • In postmortem samples from eight humans, the highest levels of chloroform were detected in the body fat (5 68 g/kg), with lower levels (1 10 g/kg) detected in the kidney, liver, and brain.9 Studies in animals indicate rapid uptake of chloroform by the liver and kidney. (umn.edu)
  • Chloroform is metabolized, for both pathways, in humans and animals by cytochrome P450. (umn.edu)
  • proteins
  • Phenol-chloroform extraction is a liquid-liquid extraction technique in biochemistry and molecular biology for purifying DNA contaminated by histones and other proteins. (bionity.com)
  • water
  • Chloroform is not a proven carcinogen , however it caused liver and kidney cancer in rats fed water or food containing chloroform. (everything2.com)
  • Chloroform can enter the air directly from factories that make or use it and by evaporating from water and soil that contain it. (cdc.gov)
  • You are probably exposed to small amounts of chloroform in your drinking water and in beverages (such as soft drinks) made using water that contains chloroform. (cdc.gov)
  • You can also get chloroform in your body by eating food, by breathing air, and by skin contact with water that contains it. (cdc.gov)
  • You are most likely to be exposed to chloroform by drinking water and breathing indoor or outdoor air containing it. (cdc.gov)
  • Breath levels measured at 5 minutes following either exposure correlated with tap water levels of chloroform. (umn.edu)
  • In mice receiving chloroform via gavage in either corn oil or water, the uptake of chloroform was achieved within 10 minutes in the liver and within 1 hour in the kidney. (umn.edu)
  • safer
  • Trichloroethylene, a halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbon related to chloroform, was proposed as a safer alternative, but it, too, was later found to be carcinogenic . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • kidney
  • In animals, studies involving chloroform have shown increased incidence of liver and kidney tumors in several species by several exposure routes. (umn.edu)
  • Chloroform is metabolized mainly in the liver, but metabolism also occurs in other tissues such as the kidney. (umn.edu)
  • Nearly
  • Nearly all the chloroform made in the United States today is used to make other chemicals, but some is sold or traded to other countries. (cdc.gov)
  • anaesthetics
  • One of the earliest general anaesthetics to be used by the medical profession, chloroform, has shed light on a mystery that's puzzled doctors for more than 150 years - how such anaesthetics actually work. (emaxhealth.com)
  • And it's particularly fitting that this evidence was revealed by chloroform, the 'grandfather' of modern anaesthetics. (emaxhealth.com)