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  • ADHD
  • He also was diagnosed with Obssesive Compulsive Disorder, a tic disorder and ADHD. (medhelp.org)
  • In the book, 'The ADD/ ADHD Answer book,' by Susan Ashley, she states that 33% of the kids with ADHD also have ODD. (medhelp.org)
  • Some behaviors associated with OCD are easy to confuse with ADHD, learning problems or being oppositional. (childmind.org)
  • Children who suffer from ADHD are incapable of sitting still, plan ahead, finish allotted tasks, or be conscious of the things happening around them. (umuccf.org)
  • A child with ADHD will not show strange behavior constantly. (umuccf.org)
  • Methylphenidate, sold under various trade names, Ritalin being one of the most commonly known, is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant of the phenethylamine and piperidine classes that is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • ADHD and other similar conditions are believed to be linked to sub-performance of the dopamine and norepinephrine functions in the brain, primarily in the prefrontal cortex, responsible for executive function (e.g., reasoning, inhibiting behaviors, organizing, problem solving, planning, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with ADHD who use stimulant medications generally have better relationships with peers and family members, generally perform better in school, are less distractible and impulsive, and have longer attention spans. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with ADHD have an increased risk of substance use disorders, and stimulant medications reduce this risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • CWPT has been effective for teaching spelling to both students in general education and students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mild intellectual disabilities, and learning disabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers have also found that while CWPT may increase the positive social interactions of students with ADHD during the tutoring, it does not necessarily affect their social behavior in other settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • anxiety
  • Five years later, parents and their children answered a number of questions regarding depression and anxiety, including attitudes at school and behavior overall. (naturalnews.com)
  • From a concern for evidence-based care, well before the phrase was coined, he introduced randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in psychopharmacology and showed that "tranquilizing" drugs were inferior to placebo in the treatment of anxiety disorders, whereas stimulant drugs were effective in controlling hyperactivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • He completed the first RCTs of psychiatric consultation to social agencies and of the utility of brief psychotherapy in anxiety disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • communities
  • These evidence-based principles are being employed in education, treatment, juvenile justice, social service, youth development, and faith-based settings as described in a recent book with contributions from over 30 international leaders in transforming children, families, communities, and organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychiatric
  • He was on the DSM IV subcommittee on learning disorders with the American Psychiatric Association from 1988-1994 and received a Best Article of the Year Award from this association. (wikipedia.org)
  • During her career at Washington University, Robins was recognized as a leader in research into psychiatric epidemiology, the study of the root causes of mental disorders in a population-wide sense. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her major study on the subject was published in 1966 under the title, "Deviant Children Grown Up: A Sociological and Psychiatric Study of Sociopathic Personality. (wikipedia.org)
  • This work would shape the later diagnosis of Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Robins would sit on the American Psychiatric Association's DSM committee which decided upon it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Robins also served on the editorial boards of numerous journals, including Criminal Behavior and Mental Health, Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale, International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, Development and Psychopathology, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Psychological Medicine, and Social and Community Psychiatry. (wikipedia.org)
  • adolescent
  • Explanation for parents of the similarities and differences of two adolescent behavior disorders. (dmoztools.net)
  • He received the Sidney Berman award on Learning Disorders from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was the Co-Chairman of Practice Parameters on Learning Disabilities committee for the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry from 1996 to 1998 and on the Committee of Professional Advisors for the Professional Group for Attention and Related Disorders from 1990 to 1991. (wikipedia.org)
  • childhood
  • Childhood is a time of exploration that for some children and parents proves especially onerous. (behaviordisorders.net)
  • A doctoral dissertation by sociologist William Jackson documents how these four core values (or their synonyms) are foundations of most key models of childhood socialization and positive youth development research. (wikipedia.org)
  • substance
  • Abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Research has found that parent-targeted interventions were effective to ameliorate Conduct Disorders and other comorbid conditions (e.g. substance abuse). (sbir.gov)
  • mental health
  • To protect both your child and others, you should involve mental health professionals and-in cases of violent threats or acts-law enforcement authorities immediately. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Psychiatry
  • In mid-2009 (June 22, 2009), a Leon Eisenberg Chair in Child Psychiatry was named at Children's Hospital Boston. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first chairholder of the Leon Eisenberg Professorship in Child Psychiatry is David R. DeMaso, MD, HMS Professor of Psychiatry and Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Children's Hospital Boston. (wikipedia.org)
  • families
  • The proposed research will evaluate the use of the revised PW to Hispanic, African-American and non-Hispanic White parents enrolled in community agencies providing services to families with youth ages 10 through 17 at significant risk for drug abuse and diagnosed with disruptive behavioral disorders. (sbir.gov)
  • Disruptive child behavior doesn't occur in a vacuum, and parent-child interactions are the primary context within which child development unfolds," Jonathan Comer, a researcher at the Center for Children and Families at Florida International University in Miami, said by email. (reuters.com)
  • The findings should offer some reassurance to parents who want to try therapy for their children before turning to medication to address behavioral disorders, noted Daniel Bagner, also of the Center for Children and Families. (reuters.com)
  • There are many ways you can help children and their families get the care they need. (childrenshospital.org)
  • For fourteen years, Brendtro was president of Starr Commonwealth in Michigan and Ohio, serving troubled children and their families through residential, community, and educational programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • aggression
  • While medication can sometimes be helpful when problems are complex and include extremely challenging behaviors (e.g. severe aggression), it should only be used in conjunction with psychosocial treatment," Bagner, who wasn't involved in the study, said by email. (reuters.com)
  • therapy
  • Reuters Health) - Children with disruptive behavior disorders may respond best to therapy when their parents participate, too, a research review suggests. (reuters.com)
  • In their analysis of previous studies of interventions, they found that while any therapy was better than none, the children didn't respond as well to treatment on their own as they did to approaches focused on their parents. (reuters.com)
  • Parents had the biggest impact on the outcomes of therapy for preschoolers and for kids in elementary school, rather than for teenagers, the study found. (reuters.com)
  • Even so, the authors conclude that parent involvement, either alone or in combination with other components of therapy, is more likely to help children improve their behavior than leaving parents out of the mix. (reuters.com)
  • Parents can make therapy more successful for their children because when kids are treated on their own, the lessons may be hard for them to apply in the settings where they have behavior problems, like home, school or the playground, said Ricardo Eiraldi, a researcher in pediatric psychology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia. (reuters.com)
  • When parents are involved, therapy can help them learn behavior management strategies to help their children improve, Eiraldi, who wasn't involved in the study, added by email. (reuters.com)
  • The paper also offers more evidence that parents can help kids most by getting involved in therapy sooner, Matt Burkey, a researcher at Johns Hopkins University who wasn't involved in the study, said by email. (reuters.com)
  • severe
  • It is of interest that the poor prognosis was evident both in the narrowly and broadly defined cases and that, because many of the cases now called autistic would have been called "mental retardation: moderate to severe", they would have joined other such children with a relatively poor outcome. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Many studies included in the analysis lacked outcomes data from independent observations of children by researchers who didn't know what type of treatment the kids received, the authors acknowledge. (reuters.com)
  • An overview of the Circle of Courage model which applies Native American principles of child rearing to education, treatment, and youth development. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Successful approaches might include praise for good behavior, ignoring minor misbehavior, giving effective commands, and letting the child earn rewards for behaving according to expectations, he said. (reuters.com)
  • His youth advocacy efforts include service as a practitioner member of the United States Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention during the administrations of Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Obama. (wikipedia.org)
  • interventions
  • Common sense and research evidence suggest that parent involvement is important to a wide range of psychosocial interventions for children, not just those aimed at alleviating disruptive child behavior," said lead author Richard Epstein, a research fellow at the Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, who did the analysis while at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. (reuters.com)
  • indigenous
  • They studied how traditional indigenous cultures were able to rear respectful, responsible children without resorting to coercive discipline. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Bakwin and his wife co-authored an early piece on the speech disorder cluttering (also called tachyphemia) in 1952, years before cluttering was commonly discussed. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • PW was originally delivered on CD-ROM and has been translated to an internet-based delivery system and has been shown to effectively reduce child problem behaviors and improve parenting skills This research will increase PW's appeal and effectiveness by revising the videos to increase the relevance and diversity of parenting examples, thereby enhancing the potential wider implementation and keeping an evidence-based practice fresh and relevant. (sbir.gov)
  • citation needed] The model integrates the cultural wisdom of tribal peoples and findings of modern youth development research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Challenges the notion that any kid is "too far gone" to be helped and shares strategies based on research and actual cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • That research identified traditional Native American practices for rearing children in environments of respect with core values of belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drawing on emerging research on neuroscience, trauma, and positive psychology, this model identifies two additional needs or drives that motivate behavior, namely safety and adventure. (wikipedia.org)
  • problem
  • PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Delivery of parenting skills training to manage teen problem behavior using technology via the internet and interactive CD-Rom has produced strong outcomes at low cost using the Parenting Wisely (PW) program. (sbir.gov)
  • The point of this exercise is to help us be cautious when assuming we know what is causing a particular behavior problem. (come-over.to)
  • display
  • The Bakwins traveled to Europe every year with their four children, and bought art to display in their Manhattan town house. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • The improved understanding of the events and expectations may lead to a change in behavior, although it is suggested that the goal of a Social Story should not be to change individual behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • attention
  • If a child is busy thinking that if she doesn't turn the pen cap and count to four the right way then her mom is going to get sick, she's not going to be paying attention in class. (childmind.org)
  • He has no other disorders other than the typical attention deficits. (come-over.to)
  • psychologist
  • Ruth Morris Bakwin (1898 - July 31, 1985) was a noted pediatrician and child psychologist and the first woman intern at the Fifth Avenue Hospital in New York City (now the New York Medical College). (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • Extending the evidence-based positive peer culture model, Cultures of Respect (COR), authored by Erik Laursen of Denmark provides training for adult leaders and professionals responsible for creating prosocial climates with and among youth in schools, group work, and justice settings. (wikipedia.org)