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  • intracranial
  • and in the conclusions the author writes " The Egyptian physician Imhotep is the most likely to be the first one to discover intracranial cerebrospinal fluid in vivo in 3000 B.C. The description of the discovery was found in The Papyrus of Smith of 1600 B.C. " [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Anatomical
  • In the same year his anatomical dissertation De aquaeductibus auris humane internae, following the work of Guichard Joseph Duverney and Antonio Maria Valsalva and anticipating that of Hermann von Helmholtz, described the vestibule, semicircular canals, and cochlea of the osseus labyrinth of the internal ear, demonstrated the existence of the labyrinthine fluid, and formulated a theory of resonance and hearing. (wikipedia.org)
  • ventricular
  • The first one (formed by a very high cylindrical cells) release their secretions into the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid and the hypendyma cells (located under the ependyma), characterized by numerous blood capillaries and glial cells, projects into the local blood vessels and to the subarachnoidal space. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiological
  • The subcommissural organ/Reissner's fiber complex is one of the factors involved in the cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption and circulation, which under normal physiological conditions, is secreted continuously, although this secretion undergoes circadian variations. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • Is acetylcholine (ACh) metabolism in brain reflected by changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)? (springer.com)
  • The composition of CSF is same to that of brain extracellular fluid. (springer.com)
  • Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) is a buffer solution that is used experimentally to immerse isolated brains, brain slices, or exposed brain regions to supply oxygen, maintain osmolarity, and to buffer pH at biological levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ependymal cells of the SCO, are also involved in the production of brain transthyretin, which is a protein involved in the transport of thyroid hormones in blood and also plays a role in transporting the cerebrospinal fluid. (wikipedia.org)
  • ISBN
  • This invaluable resource provides a comprehensive description of the anatomy of CSF spaces and variants and abnormal conditions.Kaufman, Howard H. is the author of 'Cerebrospinal Fluid Collections' with ISBN 9781879284487 and ISBN 1879284480. (valorebooks.com)
  • typically
  • People who are losing cerebrospinal fluid will typically notice the liquid coming out of their ears or nose depending on where their skull is damaged, and headaches and vision loss are common symptoms, according to Cleveland Clinic. (merriam-webster.com)
  • Meningocele typically causes mild problems with a sac of fluid present at the gap in the spine. (wikipedia.org)
  • shunt
  • Both underdrainage (due to partial obstruction of fluid flow along inlet, shunt body or outlet) and overdrainage are not desirable. (springer.com)
  • neurological
  • It applies physical principles and design concepts to neurophysics seeking to close the gap between fluid mechanics and neurosurgical and neurological medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • There is a connection from the subarachnoid space to the bony labyrinth of the inner ear making the cerebrospinal fluid continuous with the perilymph in 93% of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Reductions of about 40 percent were observed in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients given the highest dose of the drug, called Ionis HTTRx. (merriam-webster.com)
  • It can have devastating complications in some patients, as the communication between the nasal cavity and the cerebrospinal fluid and CNS can result in bacterial infections of the CNS that can have catastrophic effects on the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • pressure
  • Fluid movement is pulsatile, matching the pressure waves generated in blood vessels by the beating of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • In ventriculo-peritoneal shunts this gradient generates distal negative pressure caused by the fluid column in peritoneal drain. (springer.com)
  • Some scientists think zero gravity increases the cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the skull, increasing pressure in the back of the eyeballs and the optic nerve, Zawieja said. (merriam-webster.com)
  • role
  • nevertheless, some lines of evidence suggest that the organ may participate in different process, such as the clearance of certain compounds and the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid, and it could also play a role in some morphogenetic mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Aquilonius, S.-M. and Eckernas, S.-A, 1975, Choline acetyltransferase in human cerebrospinal fluid: non-enzymatically and enzymatically catalyzed acetylcholine synthesis, J. Neurochem. (springer.com)
  • High
  • Ependymal cells also secrete high molecular mass glycoproteins into the cerebrospinal fluid in which the bulk of them condense to form a filamentous structure, named Reissner's fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • It was found in 2015 that, after an apparent complete cure, with the bloodstream, saliva and organs such as the liver free of the Ebola virus, it can linger on in parts of the body not protected by the immune system, including fluid in the eye, the central nervous system and, in men, the testes and semen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Personnel in Scotland monitored those whom she had come into contact with, since the virus can be spread through exposure to the infected person's body fluids, though they said the risk was likely to be small. (wikipedia.org)