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  • viability
  • This enhances the ability for scientists to study basic biological mechanisms such as cell number monitoring, cell viability, proliferation and morphology. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • Support non-enzymatic harvesting of adherent cells for preservation of cell viability and surface proteins with Thermo Scientific™ Nunc™ Dishes with UpCell™ Surface. (fishersci.com)
  • For the majority of isolated primary cells, they undergo the process of senescence and stop dividing after a certain number of population doublings while generally retaining their viability (described as the Hayflick limit). (wikipedia.org)
  • Appropriate dilutions are then made, depending on cell number in the starting population, as well as the viability and characteristics of the cells being cloned. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) Phototoxicity Test, approved by the OECD, detects the viability of 3T3 cells after exposure to a chemical in the presence or absence of light. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro cell
  • Eric Simon, in a 1988 NIH SBIR grant report, showed that electrospinning could be used to produced nano- and submicron-scale polystyrene and polycarbonate fibrous mats (now known as scaffolds) specifically intended for use as in vitro cell substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • protocols
  • From product selection guides to application notes to protocols, our online resource library is available anytime you need to facilitate your cell culture applications. (corning.com)
  • In Epithelial Cell Culture Protocols, a team of well-versed experimenters and clinical researchers share their best methods for establishing and maintaining epithelial cell cultures, for analyzing and studying their characteristics, and for using them to set up models of critical biological systems. (springer.com)
  • cgb at biomail.ucsd.edu (Cindy Gustafson-Brown) wrote: I am interested in generating primary keratinocyte cell cultures and would appreciate any advice, references, protocols, and sources of reagents. (bio.net)
  • Alternatively, the B-cells and myelomas can be made to fuse by chemical protocols, most often using polyethylene glycol. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibroblasts
  • This early use of electrospun fibrous lattices for cell culture and tissue engineering showed that various cell types including Human Foreskin Fibroblasts (HFF), transformed Human Carcinoma (HEp-2), and Mink Lung Epithelium (MLE) would adhere to and proliferate upon the fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Professor Przyborski is developing new and innovative ways to manage the growth and function of cultured cells. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • Used as basal medium for supporting the growth of many different mammalian cells. (fishersci.com)
  • Used in the growth of neuronal cells from hippocampus, cortex and otregions of the brain. (fishersci.com)
  • Tissue-culture (TC) treated for optimum attachment and growth of anchorage-dependent cells. (fishersci.com)
  • Cell culture is set to see huge increases in growth including the recent advances in techniques such as 3D cell culture. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • however, only the white cells are capable of growth in culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, pieces of tissue can be placed in growth media, and the cells that grow out are available for culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aside from temperature and gas mixture, the most commonly varied factor in culture systems is the cell growth medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The third dimension of cell growth provides more contact space for mechanical inputs and for cell adhesion, which is necessary for integrin ligation, cell contraction and even intracellular signalling. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2D, the cells must undergo regular trypsinization in order to provide them with sufficient nutrients for normal cell growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3D spheroids have been cultured in a lab setting for up to 302 days while still maintaining healthy, non-cancerous growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Microfluidics refers to a set of technologies for the manipulation for the small fluid volumes within artificially fabricated microsystems.And cell culture refers to the maintenance and growth of cells in a controlled laboratory environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oxygen, required by cells for growth, is fed into the liquid medium through a porous wall in the chamber. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the cell populations is fed with growth medium containing normal amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Several different types of hydrogels from natural and synthetic materials are available for 3D cell culture, including e.g. animal ECM extract hydrogels, protein hydrogels, peptide hydrogels, polymer hydrogels, and wood-based nanocellulose hydrogel. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are currently more than 100 insect cell lines available for recombinant protein production with lines derived from Bombyx mori, Mamestra brassicae, Spodoptera frugiperda, Trichoplusia ni, and Drosophila melanogaster being of particular interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • SILAC (stable isotope labeling by/with amino acids in cell culture) is a technique based on mass spectrometry that detects differences in protein abundance among samples using non-radioactive isotopic labeling. (wikipedia.org)
  • SILAC has emerged as a very powerful method to study cell signaling, post translation modifications such as phosphorylation, protein-protein interaction and regulation of gene expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • neuronal
  • Gibco™ Neurobasal™ Medium is a basal medium that meets the special cell culture requirements of pre-natal and embryonic neuronal cells when used with Gibco™ B-27™ Supplement. (fishersci.com)
  • grow
  • Grow cells right, right from the start. (corning.com)
  • A 3D cell culture is an artificially created environment in which biological cells are permitted to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS) is a device designed to grow three-dimensional cell clusters in microgravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • A closed tubular cylinder forms the system's cell culture chamber, which is filled with a liquid medium in which cells grow on micrometre-size beads. (wikipedia.org)
  • The myeloma cell line that is used in this process is selected for its ability to grow in tissue culture and for an absence of antibody synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multiwell plates are used initially to grow the hybridomas, and after selection, are changed to larger tissue culture flasks. (wikipedia.org)
  • artificial
  • An established or immortalized cell line has acquired the ability to proliferate indefinitely either through random mutation or deliberate modification, such as artificial expression of the telomerase gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • This initiates cell-cell interactions in the absence of any artificial surface or matrix. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial cells, blood substitutes, and immobilization biotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • characterization
  • Relevant disease models, applications of 3D models in clinic and industry, predictive cell models for compound characterization, and enabling technologies will also be covered. (corning.com)
  • embryonic
  • In 1885, Wilhelm Roux removed a portion of the medullary plate of an embryonic chicken and maintained it in a warm saline solution for several days, establishing the principle of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • When the cells are growing in this medium, they incorporate the heavy arginine into all of their proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The trick is that the proteins from both cell populations can be combined and analyzed together by mass spectrometry. (wikipedia.org)
  • organ
  • Researchers globally are realizing the potential of 3D cell culture for various applications, including testing and discovering new drugs to treat cancer, organ-on-chip models to study the human physiology in an organ specific context, and 3D cell printing to produce organ models. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • refers
  • This refers to the in vitro assessment of material to determine whether it releases toxic chemicals in sufficient quantities to kill cells either directly or indirectly through the inhibition of cell metabolic pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • cryopreservation
  • This maintains the well-being of the hybridomas and provides enough cells for cryopreservation and supernatant for subsequent investigations. (wikipedia.org)
  • lines
  • Does anybody know the origins of the Schneider cell and Kc cell lines? (bio.net)
  • cell lines (my lit searches have turned up nothing). (bio.net)
  • On page 118, he gives in-text citation of the original papers describing the origins of the cell lines, on pages 133-138 he gives the complete bibliographical references. (bio.net)
  • The laboratory technique of maintaining live cell lines (a population of cells descended from a single cell and containing the same genetic makeup) separated from their original tissue source became more robust in the middle 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous cell lines are well established as representative of particular cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • The European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures houses and supplies cell lines. (wikipedia.org)
  • August 1, 1920 - October 4, 1951) was an African American woman whose cancer cells are the source of the HeLa cell line, the first immortalized cell line and one of the most important cell lines in medical research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though some information about the origins of HeLa's immortalized cell lines was known to researchers after 1970, the Lacks family was not made aware of the line's existence until 1975. (wikipedia.org)
  • surfaces
  • Constructed of flat, optically clear polystyrene surfaces for distortion-free microscopic visualization of cells. (fishersci.com)
  • applications
  • Lentiviruses are enveloped retroviruses that are becoming major biological tools in cell therapy applications. (corning.com)
  • The 3D Cell Culture conference will highlight successful stories of 3D culture applications as well as the latest technologies and innovations. (corning.com)
  • Gibco™ DMEM, Powder, High Glucose, No Sodium Bicarbonate Buffer is used in cell culture processing applications. (fishersci.com)
  • Using Nunc Glass Bottom Dishes in your research applications gives you the flexibility to convert your culture device into an imaging device. (fishersci.com)
  • One complication of these blood-derived ingredients is the potential for contamination of the culture with viruses or prions, particularly in medical biotechnology applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Applications for the procedure include cloning of parasites, T cells, transgenic cells, and macrophages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Culture of animal cells : a manual of basic technique and specialized applications (6th ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • advantages
  • There are some advantages of microfluidic culture over macroscopic culture.That is in culture in flasks, dishes and well plates.There is great flexibility in the design of micro fluidic devices. (wikipedia.org)
  • Characteristics
  • This often compromises experiments in basic life science, leads to misleading drug-screening results on efficacy and toxicity, and produces cells that may lack the characteristics needed for developing tissue regeneration therapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • line
  • To maximize cell yield, choose from our comprehensive line of standard and custom culture media, including basal salt solutions, antibiotics, sera, and specialty media. (corning.com)
  • These cells were then cultured by George Otto Gey who created the cell line known as HeLa, which is still used for medical research. (wikipedia.org)
  • These isolated B cells are in turn fused with immortal B cell cancer cells, a myeloma, to produce a hybrid cell line called a hybridoma, which has both the antibody-producing ability of the B-cell and the exaggerated longevity and reproductivity of the myeloma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although originally derived from a mouse embryo, the 3T3 cell line was developed in 1962. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vaccine was produced by Novartis through culturing of the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. (wikipedia.org)
  • microgravity
  • In the early 1990s, NASA researchers began developing hardware that would let them study the cell tissues of mammals-including humans-in microgravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chamber rotates around a horizontal axis, allowing the cells to develop in an environment similar to the free-fall of microgravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Early studies in the 80's, led by Mina Bissell from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, highlighted the importance of 3D techniques for creating accurate in vitro culturing models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viral
  • Viral culture is also related, with cells as hosts for the viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The potential use of cell culture techniques in developing viral vaccines, especially for the Influenza virus, has been widely investigated in recent years as a complementary and alternative platform to the current egg-based strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • viability
  • This enhances the ability for scientists to study basic biological mechanisms such as cell number monitoring, cell viability, proliferation and morphology. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • Support non-enzymatic harvesting of adherent cells for preservation of cell viability and surface proteins with Thermo Scientific™ Nunc™ Dishes with UpCell™ Surface. (fishersci.com)
  • For the majority of isolated primary cells, they undergo the process of senescence and stop dividing after a certain number of population doublings while generally retaining their viability (described as the Hayflick limit). (wikipedia.org)
  • Appropriate dilutions are then made, depending on cell number in the starting population, as well as the viability and characteristics of the cells being cloned. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) Phototoxicity Test, approved by the OECD, detects the viability of 3T3 cells after exposure to a chemical in the presence or absence of light. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro cell
  • Eric Simon, in a 1988 NIH SBIR grant report, showed that electrospinning could be used to produced nano- and submicron-scale polystyrene and polycarbonate fibrous mats (now known as scaffolds) specifically intended for use as in vitro cell substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • protocols
  • From product selection guides to application notes to protocols, our online resource library is available anytime you need to facilitate your cell culture applications. (corning.com)
  • In Epithelial Cell Culture Protocols, a team of well-versed experimenters and clinical researchers share their best methods for establishing and maintaining epithelial cell cultures, for analyzing and studying their characteristics, and for using them to set up models of critical biological systems. (springer.com)
  • cgb at biomail.ucsd.edu (Cindy Gustafson-Brown) wrote: I am interested in generating primary keratinocyte cell cultures and would appreciate any advice, references, protocols, and sources of reagents. (bio.net)
  • Alternatively, the B-cells and myelomas can be made to fuse by chemical protocols, most often using polyethylene glycol. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibroblasts
  • This early use of electrospun fibrous lattices for cell culture and tissue engineering showed that various cell types including Human Foreskin Fibroblasts (HFF), transformed Human Carcinoma (HEp-2), and Mink Lung Epithelium (MLE) would adhere to and proliferate upon the fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Professor Przyborski is developing new and innovative ways to manage the growth and function of cultured cells. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • Used as basal medium for supporting the growth of many different mammalian cells. (fishersci.com)
  • Used in the growth of neuronal cells from hippocampus, cortex and otregions of the brain. (fishersci.com)
  • Tissue-culture (TC) treated for optimum attachment and growth of anchorage-dependent cells. (fishersci.com)
  • Cell culture is set to see huge increases in growth including the recent advances in techniques such as 3D cell culture. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • however, only the white cells are capable of growth in culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, pieces of tissue can be placed in growth media, and the cells that grow out are available for culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aside from temperature and gas mixture, the most commonly varied factor in culture systems is the cell growth medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The third dimension of cell growth provides more contact space for mechanical inputs and for cell adhesion, which is necessary for integrin ligation, cell contraction and even intracellular signalling. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2D, the cells must undergo regular trypsinization in order to provide them with sufficient nutrients for normal cell growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3D spheroids have been cultured in a lab setting for up to 302 days while still maintaining healthy, non-cancerous growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Microfluidics refers to a set of technologies for the manipulation for the small fluid volumes within artificially fabricated microsystems.And cell culture refers to the maintenance and growth of cells in a controlled laboratory environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oxygen, required by cells for growth, is fed into the liquid medium through a porous wall in the chamber. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the cell populations is fed with growth medium containing normal amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Several different types of hydrogels from natural and synthetic materials are available for 3D cell culture, including e.g. animal ECM extract hydrogels, protein hydrogels, peptide hydrogels, polymer hydrogels, and wood-based nanocellulose hydrogel. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are currently more than 100 insect cell lines available for recombinant protein production with lines derived from Bombyx mori, Mamestra brassicae, Spodoptera frugiperda, Trichoplusia ni, and Drosophila melanogaster being of particular interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • SILAC (stable isotope labeling by/with amino acids in cell culture) is a technique based on mass spectrometry that detects differences in protein abundance among samples using non-radioactive isotopic labeling. (wikipedia.org)
  • SILAC has emerged as a very powerful method to study cell signaling, post translation modifications such as phosphorylation, protein-protein interaction and regulation of gene expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • neuronal
  • Gibco™ Neurobasal™ Medium is a basal medium that meets the special cell culture requirements of pre-natal and embryonic neuronal cells when used with Gibco™ B-27™ Supplement. (fishersci.com)
  • grow
  • Grow cells right, right from the start. (corning.com)
  • A 3D cell culture is an artificially created environment in which biological cells are permitted to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS) is a device designed to grow three-dimensional cell clusters in microgravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • A closed tubular cylinder forms the system's cell culture chamber, which is filled with a liquid medium in which cells grow on micrometre-size beads. (wikipedia.org)
  • The myeloma cell line that is used in this process is selected for its ability to grow in tissue culture and for an absence of antibody synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multiwell plates are used initially to grow the hybridomas, and after selection, are changed to larger tissue culture flasks. (wikipedia.org)
  • artificial
  • An established or immortalized cell line has acquired the ability to proliferate indefinitely either through random mutation or deliberate modification, such as artificial expression of the telomerase gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • This initiates cell-cell interactions in the absence of any artificial surface or matrix. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial cells, blood substitutes, and immobilization biotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • characterization
  • Relevant disease models, applications of 3D models in clinic and industry, predictive cell models for compound characterization, and enabling technologies will also be covered. (corning.com)
  • embryonic
  • In 1885, Wilhelm Roux removed a portion of the medullary plate of an embryonic chicken and maintained it in a warm saline solution for several days, establishing the principle of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • When the cells are growing in this medium, they incorporate the heavy arginine into all of their proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The trick is that the proteins from both cell populations can be combined and analyzed together by mass spectrometry. (wikipedia.org)
  • organ
  • Researchers globally are realizing the potential of 3D cell culture for various applications, including testing and discovering new drugs to treat cancer, organ-on-chip models to study the human physiology in an organ specific context, and 3D cell printing to produce organ models. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • refers
  • This refers to the in vitro assessment of material to determine whether it releases toxic chemicals in sufficient quantities to kill cells either directly or indirectly through the inhibition of cell metabolic pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • cryopreservation
  • This maintains the well-being of the hybridomas and provides enough cells for cryopreservation and supernatant for subsequent investigations. (wikipedia.org)
  • lines
  • Does anybody know the origins of the Schneider cell and Kc cell lines? (bio.net)
  • cell lines (my lit searches have turned up nothing). (bio.net)
  • On page 118, he gives in-text citation of the original papers describing the origins of the cell lines, on pages 133-138 he gives the complete bibliographical references. (bio.net)
  • The laboratory technique of maintaining live cell lines (a population of cells descended from a single cell and containing the same genetic makeup) separated from their original tissue source became more robust in the middle 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous cell lines are well established as representative of particular cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • The European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures houses and supplies cell lines. (wikipedia.org)
  • August 1, 1920 - October 4, 1951) was an African American woman whose cancer cells are the source of the HeLa cell line, the first immortalized cell line and one of the most important cell lines in medical research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though some information about the origins of HeLa's immortalized cell lines was known to researchers after 1970, the Lacks family was not made aware of the line's existence until 1975. (wikipedia.org)
  • surfaces
  • Constructed of flat, optically clear polystyrene surfaces for distortion-free microscopic visualization of cells. (fishersci.com)
  • applications
  • Lentiviruses are enveloped retroviruses that are becoming major biological tools in cell therapy applications. (corning.com)
  • The 3D Cell Culture conference will highlight successful stories of 3D culture applications as well as the latest technologies and innovations. (corning.com)
  • Gibco™ DMEM, Powder, High Glucose, No Sodium Bicarbonate Buffer is used in cell culture processing applications. (fishersci.com)
  • Using Nunc Glass Bottom Dishes in your research applications gives you the flexibility to convert your culture device into an imaging device. (fishersci.com)
  • One complication of these blood-derived ingredients is the potential for contamination of the culture with viruses or prions, particularly in medical biotechnology applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Applications for the procedure include cloning of parasites, T cells, transgenic cells, and macrophages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Culture of animal cells : a manual of basic technique and specialized applications (6th ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • advantages
  • There are some advantages of microfluidic culture over macroscopic culture.That is in culture in flasks, dishes and well plates.There is great flexibility in the design of micro fluidic devices. (wikipedia.org)
  • Characteristics
  • This often compromises experiments in basic life science, leads to misleading drug-screening results on efficacy and toxicity, and produces cells that may lack the characteristics needed for developing tissue regeneration therapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • line
  • To maximize cell yield, choose from our comprehensive line of standard and custom culture media, including basal salt solutions, antibiotics, sera, and specialty media. (corning.com)
  • These cells were then cultured by George Otto Gey who created the cell line known as HeLa, which is still used for medical research. (wikipedia.org)
  • These isolated B cells are in turn fused with immortal B cell cancer cells, a myeloma, to produce a hybrid cell line called a hybridoma, which has both the antibody-producing ability of the B-cell and the exaggerated longevity and reproductivity of the myeloma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although originally derived from a mouse embryo, the 3T3 cell line was developed in 1962. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vaccine was produced by Novartis through culturing of the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. (wikipedia.org)
  • microgravity
  • In the early 1990s, NASA researchers began developing hardware that would let them study the cell tissues of mammals-including humans-in microgravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chamber rotates around a horizontal axis, allowing the cells to develop in an environment similar to the free-fall of microgravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Early studies in the 80's, led by Mina Bissell from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, highlighted the importance of 3D techniques for creating accurate in vitro culturing models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viral
  • Viral culture is also related, with cells as hosts for the viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The potential use of cell culture techniques in developing viral vaccines, especially for the Influenza virus, has been widely investigated in recent years as a complementary and alternative platform to the current egg-based strategies. (wikipedia.org)