• COMT
  • Since the identification of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) by Axelrod in 1957, many inhibitors of this enzyme have been reported. (eurekaselect.com)
  • This review summarizes the major classes of COMT inhibitors, from early catechol and pyrogallol variants to bisubstrate inhibitors. (eurekaselect.com)
  • A novel isolation procedure was developed that allowed the purification of rat liver and human placenta catechol-O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.6, COMT) enzyme from rat and human sources to a degree sufficient to allow the amino acid sequencing of the enzyme. (lu.se)
  • misc{d359f84f-dce1-45b6-b22f-f3eac7b75b3d, abstract = {A novel isolation procedure was developed that allowed the purification of rat liver and human placenta catechol-O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.6, COMT) enzyme from rat and human sources to a degree sufficient to allow the amino acid sequencing of the enzyme. (lu.se)
  • The catechol estrogens are formed from estradiol and estrone by cytochrome P450 enzymes predominantly in the liver but also in extrahepatic tissues, and are metabolized by catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) into methoxylated estrogens such as 2-methoxyestradiol and 4-methoxyestrone as well as by conjugation via other phase II enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to being substrates for COMT similarly to catecholamines like dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, catechol estrogens are potent competitive inhibitors of COMT as well as of tyrosine hydroxylase, and may affect both catecholamine biosynthesis and metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of particular interest was catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), an enzyme involved in metabolizing catecholamines released following neuronal activity. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • After validating altered expression of representative candidates by western blot analysis, we subsequently targeted catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), an enzyme involved in the metabolism of the catecholamines dopamine and norepinephrine, for a more extensive characterization. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In humans, catechol-O-methyltransferase protein is encoded by the COMT gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any compound having a catechol structure, like catecholestrogens and catechol-containing flavonoids, are substrates of COMT. (wikipedia.org)
  • Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). (wikipedia.org)
  • dopamine
  • 10,11 Catechol functionalities can be introduced by immersing material substrates in an alkaline solution of 3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine (dopamine). (rsc.org)
  • To prevent the use of excessive dopamine, catechols can be directly coupled to synthetic polymers using dopamine or 3,4-dihydroxyhydrocinnamic acid, resulting in the formation of amide bonds. (rsc.org)
  • Catechol-O-methyltransferase is involved in the inactivation of the catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine). (wikipedia.org)
  • hydroxyl
  • 1,2-CTD uses Fe3+ as a cofactor to cleave the carbon-carbon bond between the phenolic hydroxyl groups of catechol, thus yielding muconic acid as its product. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, 2,3-CTD utilizes Fe2+ as a cofactor to cleave the carbon-carbon bond adjacent to the phenolic hydroxyl groups of catechol, thus yielding 2-hydroxymuconaldehye as its product. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second catechol hydroxyl group on carbon 3 (C3) is coordinated to Fe3+ after its deprotonation by the Tyr200 ligand. (wikipedia.org)
  • quinones
  • Cyclic esters are formed upon treatment with phosphorus trichloride and phosphorus oxychloride, carbonyl chloride, and sulphuryl chloride: C6H4(OH)2 + XCl2 → C6H4(O2X) + 2 HCl where X = CO, SO2, PCl, P(O)Cl Catechols produce quinones with the addition of ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN). (wikipedia.org)
  • 9 Once exposed to oxygen, catechol residues are oxidized to reactive o -quinones. (rsc.org)
  • catecholamines
  • Catecholamines are biochemically significant hormones/neurotransmitters that are phenethylamines in which the phenyl group has a catechol skeleton structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • catechin
  • Catechol was first isolated in 1839 by Edgar Hugo Emil Reinsch (1809 - 1884) by distilling it from the solid tannic preparation catechin, which is the residuum of catechu, the boiled or concentrated juice of Mimosa catechu (Acacia catechu L.f). (wikipedia.org)
  • undergo
  • In reducing conditions, catechol residues can undergo various interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions or metal-catechol coordination. (rsc.org)
  • mechanism
  • It can safely be presumed that a part of the rearrangement proceeds counter-clockwise by the ortho mechanism as for catechol monoallyl ether, thereby yielding the expected 3-allylcatechol ( VIII ). (erowid.org)
  • The results are consistent with a mechanism in which O 2 oxidizes both mono-deprotonated and fully deprotonated catechol anions. (rsc.org)
  • As a defence mechanism, siderocalin can substitute ferric bis-catechol complexes (formed under physiological conditions) with a third catechol, in order to achieve a hexacoordinate ferric complex, resulting in higher affinity binding. (wikipedia.org)
  • reversible
  • Reversible increases in catechol signal were observed during reversible increases in arterial partial CO2 pressure (PaCO2) from 20 to 60 mmHg after alteration of tidal volume (n = 5 intact rats, n = 5 after carotid sinus deafferentation). (biomedsearch.com)
  • A reversible increase in inspiratory CO2 combined with constant tidal volume led to changes in PaCO2 from 40 mmHg to 50 or 60 or 70 mmHg for 60 min (n = 5 in each group) and to a reversible increase in catechol signal (r = 0.76). (biomedsearch.com)
  • metabolism
  • The level of catechol metabolism in the RVLM 1) is continuously related to the level of arterial CO2, 2) functions close to its resting level under baseline nonstimulated condition with respect to CO2, and 3) is reversibly modified on changes in capnia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Catechols such as DHSA are produced through the metabolism of cholesterol by bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • moieties
  • Catechol moieties are also found widely within the natural world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mammalian siderophores, specifically catechols, can be found in the human gut and in siderophores, such as enterobactin, and serve as iron-binding moieties. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • A functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (a common normal variant) of the gene for catechol-O-methyltransferase results in a valine to methionine mutation at position 158 (Val158Met) rs4680. (wikipedia.org)
  • functional
  • Catechols are found as functional groups in Nature as the 3,4-dihydroxy isomer, generally with electron donating substituents and as the 2,3-dihydroxy isomer, with an electron withdrawing substituent. (rsc.org)
  • ortho
  • However, in the case of monoallyl ether of catechol, the allyl group migrates to the para position despite the availability of an unsubstituted ortho position. (erowid.org)
  • mixture
  • 16 By exposing the catechol modified alginate to a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium periodate, a divalent cation-free alginate hydrogel was created that showed a high degree of viability and low immunogenicity. (rsc.org)
  • Detection
  • The amperometric results indicated that the Cu/CNFs/laccase(Lac)/Nafion/glass carbon electrode (GCE) possessed reliable analytical performance for the detection of catechol. (mdpi.com)
  • Fu J, Qiao H, Li D, Luo L, Chen K, Wei Q. Laccase Biosensor Based on Electrospun Copper/Carbon Composite Nanofibers for Catechol Detection. (mdpi.com)
  • structure
  • Urushiols are naturally existing organic compounds that have the catechol skeleton structure and diphenol functionality but with alkyl groups substituted onto the aromatic ring. (wikipedia.org)
  • carbon
  • Although catechol is the metabolic intermediate for both salicylate and benzoate, catechol did not induce either pathway when used as a sole carbon source. (springer.com)