Loading...
  • orexin
  • In narcolepsy patient (left) lacking orexin neurons, activities of the amygdala become excessive, causing cataplexy. (eurekalert.org)
  • Furthermore, the effect of orexin neurons inhibiting cataplexy was found to be abolished when serotonin release was inhibited selectively in the amygdala. (eurekalert.org)
  • patients
  • Data from the Stanford University Sleep Disorders Clinic of 200 patients with cataplexy showed that 100 percent of these patients reported laughter as the most common trigger, followed by a feeling of amusement, or surprise with happiness and joy . (scholarpedia.org)
  • Cataplexy also occurs more frequently in times of emotional stress and when patients are deprived of napping while sleepy. (scholarpedia.org)
  • A review of 100 patients with cataplexy at the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic (age range 12-20 years) reported that 62 of these patients stopped taking anti-cataplectic medications after 10 years . (scholarpedia.org)
  • All patients completed a validated questionnaire predictive of cataplexy, the Center for Narcolepsy Sleep Inventory (SSI), a validated questionnaire predictive of cataplexy 15 . (ersjournals.com)
  • syndrome
  • Cataplexy may rapidly reoccur repeatedly, giving birth to "status cataplecticus" , and to the "limp man syndrome" as described by Stalh et al . (scholarpedia.org)
  • suppress
  • This study has revealed that serotonin neurons do not directly suppress muscle tone weakening but inhibit cataplexy by reducing and controlling activities of the amygdala, which is involved in communicating emotional excitement. (eurekalert.org)
  • emotional
  • Cataplexy also has a severe emotional impact on narcoleptics, as it can cause extreme anxiety, fear, and avoidance of people or situations that might elicit an attack. (wikipedia.org)
  • inability
  • Cataplexy is an episodic loss of muscle function, ranging from slight weakness such as limpness at the neck or knees, sagging facial muscles, weakness at the knees often referred to as "knee buckling", or inability to speak clearly, to a complete body collapse. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscle
  • A study by Anic-Labat et al reported that emotions arising from "hearing or telling a joke," "laughing," or "when angry," were most predictive of the loss of muscle function in clear-cut cataplexy . (scholarpedia.org)
  • Cataplexy takes place when one is very excited in terms of one's emotion and if severe, one may lose the muscle tone of the whole body and fall down. (eurekalert.org)
  • effective
  • Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are often effective in controlling cataplexy, but also frequently produce side effects that limit their use. (rxlist.com)
  • Zimelidine was reported by Montplaisir and Godbout to be very effective for cataplexy in 1986, back when this was usually controlled by tricyclic antidepressants, which often had anticholinergic effects. (wikipedia.org)