• Extracranial
  • The anatomic preference of golf-related craniocervical arterial dissection is associated with the extracranial and vertebrobasilar system with a right-sided tendency as the result of stereotypical rotational movement during a golf swing. (ajnr.org)
  • 10 Because the golf swing is a habitual body motion that includes rapid head and body rotation, it may lead to repetitive mechanical compression of the extracranial cervical arteries during each swing. (ajnr.org)
  • Proximal
  • Proximal right ICA dissection with mid-right M1 occlusive thrombo-embolus results in large right MCA and ACA territory infarct with small ischaemi. (radiopaedia.org)
  • During proximal protection with flow blockage (Medtronic Invatec MoMa, Roncadelle, Italy), a standard 0.014-inch coronary wire was inserted in the dissection and could not be advanced further (arrow) . (onlinejacc.org)
  • This angiogram shows a small pseudoaneurysm and a small intimal dissection with an elevated intimal flap that is just proximal to the subadventitial dissection. (medscape.com)
  • patients
  • In one study of patients with carotid artery dissection, 60% had infarcts documented on neuroimaging. (wikipedia.org)
  • 70% of patients with carotid arterial dissection are between the ages of 35 and 50, with a mean age of 47 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most patients, the pathogenesis of arterial dissection is usually multifactorial. (medscape.com)
  • The advantages of MRI make this the preferred method for the initial screening and evaluation of patients with suspected arterial dissection. (medscape.com)
  • 5,6 To enable a more sophisticated antithrombotic treatment of patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection, the CADISP group recently reviewed the mechanism of brain ischemia, clinical experiences, and a systematic meta-analysis about antithrombotic agents in these patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • Immunohistochemical identification of plasma protein deposits in the wall of lenticulostriate arteries in patients with long-standing hypertension, with and without lipohyalinosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • PURPOSE: To investigate, through an immunohistochemical method, whether there is deposition of plasma proteins in the wall of lenticulostriate, cortical and leptomeningeal arteries of hypertensive patients, with and without lipohyalinosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • METHOD: Forty patients with essential hypertension were selected at random, 20 with lipohyalinosis in the lenticulostriate arteries (HH group) and 20 without lipohyalinosis (H group), matched with 20 normotensive controls (C group). (biomedsearch.com)
  • Patients with FMD in the carotid arteries typically present around 50 years of age. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior
  • These must be separated from strokes arising from the anterior circulation, which involves the carotid arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • It lodges the anterior process and anterior ligament of the malleus, and gives passage to the anterior tympanic branch of the internal maxillary artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anterior facial vein lies lateral/posterior to the artery, and takes a more direct course across the face, where it is separated from the artery by a considerable interval. (wikipedia.org)
  • Branches include: Masseteric artery Pterygoid branches Deep temporal arteries (anterior and posterior) Buccal artery The third or pterygomaxillary portion lies in the pterygopalatine fossa in relation with the pterygopalatine ganglion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lateral head anatomy detail Head anatomy anterior view Maxillary artery Maxillary artery Infratemporal fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • branches
  • It distributes twigs to the adjacent muscles, and numerous branches to the thyroid gland, connecting with its fellow of the opposite side, and with the inferior thyroid arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Besides the arteries distributed to the muscles and to the thyroid gland, the branches of the superior thyroid are: The infrahyoid branch (or hyoid artery): a small artery that runs along the lower border of the hyoid bone beneath the thyrohyoid muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inferior thyroid artery Diagram showing the origins of the main branches of the carotid arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • The branches of the facial nerve cross the artery from behind forward. (wikipedia.org)
  • posterior
  • Posterior segment signs include narrowed retinal arteries, dilated but nontortuous retinal veins, midperipheral dot-and-blot retinal hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, and optic nerve/retinal neovascularization. (medscape.com)
  • A second branch descends on the posterior surface of the gland and anastomoses with the inferior thyroid artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Muscles
  • Together with the internal laryngeal nerve, it pierces the lateral thyrohyoid membrane, and supplies blood to the muscles, mucous membrane, and glands of the larynx, connecting with the branch from the opposite side. (wikipedia.org)
  • Injuries
  • Victims may have internal injuries, such as laryngo-tracheal injuries, digestive tract injuries, vascular injuries, neurological system injuries and orthopedic injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore
  • Furthermore, SICAD recurring in a previously dissected carotid artery was not analyzed. (ahajournals.org)
  • Furthermore, the external laryngeal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve courses in close proximity to the superior thyroid artery, making it at risk for injury during surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • angiography
  • A suspected arterial dissection can be diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), computerized tomographic angiography (CTA), ultrasonography (US), or digital subtraction angiography (DSA). (medscape.com)
  • antiplatelet therapy
  • Recognizing a dissection early is essential, because prompt anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet therapy and endovascular repair greatly minimize the patient's risk of infarction, neurologic disability, and death. (medscape.com)