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  • European Resusci
  • It can be practiced by anyone without help of tools or drugs and is differentiated according to the patient's age baby: from 0 to 28 days infant: from 1 month to 12 months youth: from 12 months to puberty (about 10-11 years) About every five years, the European Resuscitation Council publishes updated guidelines about all stages of resuscitation, both for medical staff and for so-called lay rescuers. (wikipedia.org)
  • For these reasons, certain bodies, such as the European Resuscitation Council, recommend using manual external defibrillators over AEDs if manual external defibrillators are readily available. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rescuers
  • The protocol was originally developed as a memory aid for rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the most widely known use of the initialism is in the care of the unconscious or unresponsive patient, although it is also used as a reminder of the priorities for assessment and treatment of patients in many acute medical and trauma situations, from first-aid to hospital medical treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outcomes
  • Widespread advertising campaigns have been created to encourage more members of the lay public to undergo training in the technique of closed-chest compression-only CPR, based upon extolling the virtues of rapid initiation of resuscitation, untempered by information about the often distressing outcomes, and hailing the "improved" results when nonprofessional bystanders are involved. (bioethics.net)
  • 1-4 Utstein-style guidelines and templates also were prepared for reporting resuscitation outcomes after trauma and drowning. (ahajournals.org)
  • OTCBB:NIMU) announced report of a research study of a modification of NIMS' flagship, patented product, the AT-101(TM), which demonstrated superior outcomes than a standard closed chest message device for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Throughout history, a variety of differing methods of resuscitation had been attempted and documented, although most yielded very poor outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arrest
  • The management of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest is explored in this chapter. (springer.com)
  • Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation occurs with a reputed incidence of approximately 1% of all cases of out-of-hospital arrest, as well as 3%-9% of the cases of ventricular fibrillation unrelated to myocardial infarction, and 14% of all ventricular fibrillation resuscitations in patients under the age of 40. (wikipedia.org)
  • bypass
  • Similar to the concept of elective cardiopulmonary bypass, used in open heart surgery, oxygenation and perfusion can be maintained with an ECMO device in patients undergoing cardiovascular collapse. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Prior to the inception of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, there had been some techniques to keep people alive developed in the 18th century, both in Japan and in Europe, however it was not until the mid-20th century that James Elam and Peter Safar discovered and published the method now known as CPR. (wikipedia.org)
  • Basic
  • With simple audio and visual commands, AEDs are designed to be simple to use for the layperson, and the use of AEDs is taught in many first aid, certified first responder, and basic life support (BLS) level cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) classes. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • Safar, who began to work on cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in 1956 at Baltimore City Hospital, demonstrated in a series of experiments on paralyzed human volunteers that rescuer exhaled air mouth-to-mouth breathing could maintain satisfactory oxygen levels in the non-breathing victim, and showed that even lay people could effectively perform mouth-to-mouth breathing to save lives. (wikipedia.org)