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  • diene
  • The name butadiene can also refer to the isomer, 1,2-butadiene, which is a cumulated diene with structure H2C=C=CH−CH3. (wikipedia.org)
  • He had patented more than 20 ways to produce butadiene (buta-1,3-diene), which were implemented industrially in the Soviet Union. (wikipedia.org)
  • The in situ production and immediate consumption of cis-1,3-butadiene largely avoids contact with the diene (which is inflammatory, carcinogenic and forms explosive mixtures with air). (wikipedia.org)
  • feedstock
  • GBI Research, a leading business intelligence provider, has released its latest research, "Butadiene Market in the Americas to 2020 - Persistent Supply Shortages due to Continued Substitution of Crude Oil by Shale Gas as the Feedstock" is an in-depth report, which is focused on the demand side of the Americas butadiene industry. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Butadiene is a major feedstock to manufacture SBR, with just less than one third of its total global demand being consumed to manufacture SBR. (pitchengine.com)
  • Soviet Union
  • Worldwide production quickly ensued, with butadiene being produced from grain alcohol in the Soviet Union and the United States and from coal-derived acetylene in Germany. (wikipedia.org)
  • consumption
  • 1. Know the capital investment required Examine the operating costs & raw materials consumption Butadiene (BD) is a commodity product of the petrochemical industry. (slideshare.net)
  • The budding nature of the economies and rising consumption trends for various materials such as synthetic rubbers and ABS resin drives the demand of butadiene at a significant pace in the region. (pitchengine.com)
  • Subsequently, PBR manufacturers were the second largest consumers of butadiene with a butadiene consumption share difference of 2.4%, compared to SBR manufacturers. (pitchengine.com)
  • ethylene
  • In the United States, western Europe, and Japan, butadiene is produced as a byproduct of the steam cracking process used to produce ethylene and other alkenes. (wikipedia.org)
  • polymerization
  • Lymphohematopoietic cancer in styrene-butadiene polymerization workers. (cdc.gov)
  • For the preparation of 3-sulfoles, liquid 1,3-butadiene is added in an autoclave at about −20 °C with an excess of liquid sulfur dioxide in the presence of small amounts of a phenolic polymerization inhibitor (e.g. hydroquinone or pyrogallol) and either allowed to stand at room temperature for eight days or heated to about 130 °C for 30 minutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A similar Wurtz coupling-like reaction is the basis of the industrial route to triphenylphosphine: 3 PhCl + PCl3 + 6 Na → PPh3 + 6 NaCl The polymerization of butadiene and styrene is catalyzed by sodium metal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chloride
  • This compound is converted to a Grignard reagent by action of magnesium metal which is then reacted with copper(I) chloride to an organocopper intermediate which is in turn dimerized using copper(II) chloride in an oxidative coupling reaction to give the butadiene dimer called dendralene. (wikipedia.org)
  • cyclopentadiene
  • As early as 1938, Kurt Alder and co-workers reported Diels-Alder adducts from the isomeric 2-sulfolene with 1,3-butadiene and 2-sulfolene with cyclopentadiene. (wikipedia.org)
  • emissions
  • Industrial emissions of chemicals such as 1,3 -butadiene are reported annually to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and made available by EPA to the public in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) . (americanchemistry.com)
  • production
  • Techno-economic analyses of specific butadiene production processes, presenting capital investment breakdown, raw materials consumed and operating costs. (slideshare.net)
  • The Intratec portfolio (www.intratec.us/our-portfolio) includes reports examining specific Butadiene production processes. (slideshare.net)
  • For a 10-page description of our methodology, visit www.intratec.us/reports/industrial-processes-economics Reports Focused on Butadiene Production Economics ECONOMICS OF BUTADIENE PRODUCTION FROM N-BUTANE (BD E11A) This report presents the economics of 1,3-Butadiene (BD) production from n-butane in the USA, using a dehydrogenation process similar to CB&I Lummus Catadiene. (slideshare.net)
  • ECONOMICS OF BIO-BUTADIENE PRODUCTION FROM GLUCOSE (BD E41A) It presents the economics of bio-based 1,3-Butadiene (BD) production from glucose syrup in the USA using a direct aerobic fermentation process similar to the one proposed by Global Bioenergies. (slideshare.net)
  • Environmental sources include industrial releases from butadiene production and use, automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke and other combustion sources. (americanchemistry.com)
  • According to EPA, only 1.6 percent of total environmental releases nationally are due to butadiene production and use. (americanchemistry.com)
  • A small cohort study of 1,3-butadiene production workers showed a significant excess of lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma, based on four cases. (inchem.org)
  • Benchmark different countries by the historic and forecast growth of demand, production and end-use of butadiene. (environmental-expert.com)
  • While not competitive with steam cracking for producing large volumes of butadiene, lower capital costs make production from ethanol a viable option for smaller-capacity plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2017 there is no industrial production of butadiene from ethanol. (wikipedia.org)
  • The butadiene production method, which was based on aldol condensation of acetaldehyde (1905), was also implemented on industrial scale in Germany in 1936. (wikipedia.org)
  • sodium
  • The material was initially marketed with the brand name Buna S. Its name derives Bu for butadiene and Na for sodium (natrium in several languages including Latin, German, and Dutch), and S for styrene. (wikipedia.org)
  • mixture
  • When mixed with steam and briefly heated to very high temperatures (often over 900 °C), aliphatic hydrocarbons give up hydrogen to produce a complex mixture of unsaturated hydrocarbons, including butadiene. (wikipedia.org)
  • risks
  • Evaluation of the human carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene hinges on evidence regarding leukaemia risks from one large and well conducted study and two smaller studies. (inchem.org)
  • typically
  • Butadiene is typically isolated from the other four-carbon hydrocarbons produced in steam cracking by extractive distillation using a polar aprotic solvent such as acetonitrile, N-methylpyrrolidone, furfural, or dimethylformamide, from which it is then stripped by distillation. (wikipedia.org)
  • forecasts
  • The report provides the reader with detailed analysis and forecasts of the major economic and market trends affecting the Americas butadiene demand in the major countries of the region. (environmental-expert.com)
  • breaks down quickly
  • and butadiene breaks down quickly in sunlight and degrades in the air with a half-life of less than two hours. (americanchemistry.com)
  • Although butadiene breaks down quickly in the atmosphere, it is nevertheless found in ambient air in urban and suburban areas as a consequence of its constant emission from motor vehicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • workers
  • Adducts formed by reaction of 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-butanediol with haemoglobin and urinary mercapturic acids derived from 1,2-epoxy-3-butene have been detected in 1,3-butadiene-exposed workers. (inchem.org)