• Sanskrit and Pāli
  • A deva (देव Sanskrit and Pāli, Mongolian tenger (тэнгэр)) in Buddhism is one of many different types of non-human beings who share the godlike characteristics of being more powerful, longer-lived, and, in general, much happier than humans, although the same level of veneration is not paid to them as to buddhas. (wikipedia.org)
  • enlightenment
  • They guard and protect Buddhism on earth, and will pass into enlightenment as Arhats when they pass away from the Śuddhāvāsa worlds. (wikipedia.org)
  • GOD ON TRIAL Buddhism: Blood and Enlightenment Joseph Grosso What country is in the midst of a long-standing civil war-a war that has displaced hundreds of thousands of citizens, seen the first widespread use of suicide bombers, and in which the government fighting separatist forces has among its most militant. (secularhumanism.org)
  • Chan
  • After the Yuan, Chan more or less fused with Pure Land Buddhism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some scholars have argued that Chan developed from the interaction between Mahāyāna Buddhism and Taoism, while others insist that Chan has roots in yogic practices, specifically kammaṭṭhāna, the consideration of objects, and kasiṇa, total fixation of the mind. (wikipedia.org)
  • The idea of a patriarchal lineage in Chan Buddhism dates back to the epitaph for Fărú (法如 638-689), a disciple of the 5th patriarch, Hóngrĕn (弘忍 601-674). (wikipedia.org)
  • D. T. Suzuki contends that Chan's growth in popularity during the 7th and 8th centuries attracted criticism that it had "no authorized records of its direct transmission from the founder of Buddhism" and that Chan historians made Bodhidharma the 28th patriarch of Buddhism in response to such attacks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mahayana
  • citation needed] In Japanese Mahayana Buddhism, Hayagriva is considered as a Avalokiteśvara with wrathful form (Batō Kannon 馬頭觀音, lit.Hayagrīva-Avalokiteśvara) , one of the six Avalokiteśvaras intended to save the sentient beings of the six realms: deities (deva), demons (asura), human beings, animals, hungry ghosts, beings of hell. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • In Zen Buddhism, the most commonly used Japanese words for the abbot of a large Zen temple or Zen monastery are juji and choro. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nir is a negative, while va is commonly taken to refer to "to blow", The term nirvana is part of an extensive metaphorical structure that was probably established at a very early age in Buddhism. (wikipedia.org)
  • teachings
  • The āgamas' existence and similarity to the Sutta Pitaka are sometimes used by scholars to assess to what degree these teachings are a historically authentic representation of the Canon of Early Buddhism. (wikipedia.org)
  • historically
  • The English word "abbot" is used instead of all the various words that exist in the languages of the countries where Buddhism is, or was historically, well established. (wikipedia.org)
  • worship
  • Ari practices have largely been categorized as a tantric form of Buddhism, combining elements of Buddhism, nat worship, indigenous nāga worship and Hinduism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Appearing in the Vedas as two separate deities, he was assimilated into the ritual worship of early Buddhism and eventually was identified as a Wisdom King in Vajrayana Buddhism. (wikipedia.org)
  • origins
  • The Ch'an biographical works, however, aimed to establish Ch'an as a legitimate school of Buddhism traceable to its Indian origins, and at the same time championed a particular form of Ch'an. (wikipedia.org)
  • centuries
  • On the other hand, inscriptions in the western Deccan, where Buddhism flourished in the early centuries CE, use the term gahapati to refer to urban merchants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Throughout the first five centuries A.D., Buddhism slowly began to spread throughout southeast Asia, entering China, Korea, Japan and finally Tibet, where it eventually found its home. (reference.com)
  • Hinduism
  • The Sanskrit word smṛti स्मृति (also transliterated variously as smriti, smRti, or sm'Rti) literally means "that which is remembered", and refers both to "mindfulness" in Buddhism and "a category of metrical texts" in Hinduism, considered second in authority to the Śruti scriptures. (wikipedia.org)
  • nirvana
  • To extinguish all "Raga" (greed, lust, desire, attachment) is one of the requirements of nirvana (liberation) in Buddhism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The meaning of this metaphor was lost in later Buddhism, and other explanations of the word nirvana were sought. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite
  • Despite the long history of Buddhism in Asia, it really didn't begin to spread to the rest of the world until the 19th or 20th century. (reference.com)
  • concern
  • Out of a concern for its own survival, Buddhism could not condemn the acquisition of wealth, but it could provide principles for its dispensation-namely, giving and generosity ( dana ). (tikkun.org)
  • Traditions
  • The term was a more or less central concept among the Jains, the Ajivikas, the Buddhists, and certain Hindu traditions, and it may have been imported into Buddhism with much of its semantic range from other sramanic movements. (wikipedia.org)
  • English
  • Minh Thanh Communicative English for Buddhism 0557091608 2009 Page 319 "Aimlessness is stopping and realizing the happiness that is already available. (wikipedia.org)
  • religion
  • The incomparable loftiness of the monk figure-placid and disinterested, having renounced desire-leads many to think of Buddhism as a religion detached from all worldly concerns, especially those of economy. (tikkun.org)
  • West
  • Since the 1970s, Buddhism has also been gaining popularity in the West. (lausanne.org)
  • Can a network of Christian theologians contribute toward equipping Christians in the West to better understand and engage apologetically with new challenges of Western Buddhism? (lausanne.org)
  • One of the evolving features of Buddhism in the West is the increasing dissolution of the traditional distinction between monastics and laity. (wikipedia.org)