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  • dementia
  • Rasmussen's encephalitis, also known as chronic focal encephalitis (CFE), is a rare inflammatory neurological disease, characterized by frequent and severe seizures, loss of motor skills and speech, hemiparesis (weakness on one side of the body), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and dementia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clinical syndrome in patients with HDLS is not specific and it can be mistaken for Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, atypical Parkinsonism, multiple sclerosis, or corticobasal degeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • With symptoms of personality changes, behavioral changes, dementia, depression, and epilepsy, HDLS has been commonly misdiagnosed for a number of other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dementia or frontotemporal behavioral changes, for example, have commonly steered some clinicians to mistakenly consider diagnoses such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia or atypical Parkinsonism. (wikipedia.org)
  • onset
  • By sequencing T cell receptors from various compartments it could be shown that RE patients present with peripheral CD8+ T-cell expansion which in some cases have been proven for years after disease onset. (wikipedia.org)
  • White matter degeneration is associated with and makes differential diagnoses out of other adult onset leukodystrophies such as metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), Krabbe disease (globoid cell leukodystrophy), and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ADL). (wikipedia.org)
  • rare
  • Current researchers in the field believe that more in depth analysis and comparison of the two genetic abnormalities in these disorders could lead to a better understanding of the disease mechanisms in these rare disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • traumatic
  • This phase will involve use of brain scans at baseline and one year after the traumatic event. (psychcentral.com)
  • After a while it gets old and not so fulfilling to take the brain out when (an athlete) is dead," said Bailes, a neurosurgeon and director of the Brain Injury Research Institute, which focuses on the study of traumatic brain injuries and their prevention. (cnn.com)
  • tissue
  • Blood flow and oxygen are suddenly interrupted to an area of brain tissue, which then may die. (webmd.com)
  • Bleeding in the brain creates congestion and pressure on brain tissue, impairing healthy blood flow and causing a stroke. (webmd.com)
  • symptoms are similar to those of a stroke, but they resolve completely (usually within 24 hours) without damage to brain tissue. (webmd.com)
  • LONDON-- The specter of a fatal disease that eats away brain tissue has scared up serious new money for European scientists. (sciencemag.org)
  • An insidious, microscopic protein that has been found in the brain tissue of professional football players after death may now be detectable in living people by scanning their brains. (cnn.com)
  • myelin
  • The gene at the root of adrenoleukodystropy - ALD for short - is called ABCD1, and produces a protein necessary to maintain myelin, a compound that acts as an insulator for nerve fibers in the brain and peripheral nervous system. (wired.com)
  • Their brain scans show myelin damage that has stopped, and their new genes are active as ever. (wired.com)
  • infection
  • The BBC describes the case of the British conductor and musician Clive Wearing, who contracted a brain infection in 1985, and was left with a memory span of only 10 seconds. (dmoztools.net)
  • degeneration
  • If you give VEGF early in the disease, you prevent degeneration later in life," said Puneet Opal , M.D., associate professor of neurology and of cell and molecular biology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a neurologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital , who also treats ataxic patients. (northwestern.edu)
  • addiction
  • This supports the view, the press release notes, that "obesity must be understood as a brain disease and that hunger should also be looked at as a kind of food addiction," as obese people might be overeating largely due to an uncontrollable hunger. (macleans.ca)
  • develops
  • An artery in the brain develops a weak area that swells like a balloon. (webmd.com)
  • There is a suggestion that some specific parts of the brain may shrink as a person develops PTSD," he said. (psychcentral.com)
  • Darwin would have you losing to these guys since by the time their disease develops they have already slept with plenty of desirable women. (slashdot.org)
  • prognosis
  • Encyclopedia article about this rare developmental disorder of the brain including its presentation, causes, treatment, prognosis and inheritance. (dmoztools.net)
  • damage
  • Not to be cruel but its not like we all didn't already know getting your brain bashed repeatedly was bad for you, hell look at boxing, not even a helmet there and we have seen so many old boxers drooling on themselves from brain damage it isn't even funny. (slashdot.org)
  • We're constantly being told to put on sunscreen to protect out skin - but could it doing damage to our brains in the meantime? (foxnews.com)
  • study
  • Our study demonstrates that ghrelin actually activates certain regions of the brain to be more responsive to visual food cues, thereby enhancing the hedonic and incentive responses to food-related cues," neurologist Dr. Alain Dagher, principal investigator in the study, says in a press release. (macleans.ca)
  • The NIH conducted a study of three unidentified brains, one of which was Seau's. (newser.com)
  • Boston University's center for study of the disease reported last month that 34 former pro players and nine who played only college football suffered from CTE. (newser.com)
  • We found (the tau) in their brains, it lit up," said Dr. Gary Small, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and lead author of the study, published Tuesday in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. (cnn.com)
  • Researchers
  • Despite having normal cognitive function, his brain scan also showed tau build-up, the researchers said. (yahoo.com)
  • Researchers say they found tau protein in the brains of five living retired National Football League players with varying levels of cognitive and emotional problems. (cnn.com)
  • fatal
  • Scientists have used gene therapy to halt the progression of adrenoleukodystrophy, a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a single defective gene, in two seven-year-old boys. (wired.com)
  • Patients
  • As the disease progresses over 10 to 20 years, patients eventually die from aspiration or infectious pneumonia. (northwestern.edu)
  • Because patients are born with the mutation for the disease but don't show signs of it until midlife, Opal said that indicates the aging process appears to play a role in development of the disease. (northwestern.edu)
  • defective
  • Sialic acid storage disease, also known as Salla disease, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by defective transport of lysosomal degradation product, free sialic acid, across the lysosomal membrane. (dmoztools.net)
  • signs
  • Affected infants present first signs of the disease already at 3 to 9 months of age as muscular hypotonia, truncal and limb ataxia, often transient nystagmus and delayed motor development. (dmoztools.net)
  • Lists the clinical signs of free sialic acid storage disease. (dmoztools.net)
  • injury
  • You can heal the injury but the brain is still affected in some people. (psychcentral.com)
  • The research passed peer review within a week of being published in F1000Research, where Jan-Marino Ramirez, of the University of Washington, called the work "a very important contribution to our understanding of neurodegenerative disease and the response of the brain to injury" in his public referee report. (redorbit.com)
  • A glossary of terms used for brain injury, A-Z. (dmoztools.net)
  • people
  • The results showed FDDNP levels were higher in the brains of the former NFL players compared with healthy people. (yahoo.com)
  • clinical
  • However, as the clinical acceptance and awareness of the disorder evolves, experts are now wondering if PTSD is a brain disorder that can affect multiple parts of the body and cause lifelong illnesses. (psychcentral.com)
  • function
  • The body part controlled by the damaged brain area (such as an arm or a leg) may no longer function properly. (webmd.com)
  • Health
  • They would be in an advanced stage of the disease, in a vegetative state,' said Patrick Aubourg, a pediatric neurologist at France's National Institute for Health and Medical Research who led the treatment's development. (wired.com)
  • The unidentified man, said to be younger than 50, contracted the "new variant" form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease while in Britain, which has faced several outbreaks of the disease, said Dr. Antonio Giulivi, an official with government agency Health Canada. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Program's purpose is to increase awareness of the brain and its importance in the overall health and longevity of the human being. (dmoztools.net)
  • areas
  • If that's the case, there may be treatment approaches based on the affected areas of the brain. (psychcentral.com)
  • Levels were elevated in brain areas involved in emotional control, as well as learning, memory and behavior. (yahoo.com)
  • human
  • TORONTO -- A Canadian man has died in the country's first confirmed case of the human brain condition linked to "mad-cow" disease, officials said Thursday. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • small
  • There is now firm evidence that some engineered nanoparticles entering intravenously or via lungs can reach the brains of small animals," said Professor Vyvyan Howard, a pathologist and toxicologist, who is working on the project. (foxnews.com)
  • dementia
  • Rasmussen's encephalitis, also known as chronic focal encephalitis (CFE), is a rare inflammatory neurological disease, characterized by frequent and severe seizures, loss of motor skills and speech, hemiparesis (weakness on one side of the body), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and dementia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clinical syndrome in patients with HDLS is not specific and it can be mistaken for Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, atypical Parkinsonism, multiple sclerosis, or corticobasal degeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • With symptoms of personality changes, behavioral changes, dementia, depression, and epilepsy, HDLS has been commonly misdiagnosed for a number of other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dementia or frontotemporal behavioral changes, for example, have commonly steered some clinicians to mistakenly consider diagnoses such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia or atypical Parkinsonism. (wikipedia.org)
  • onset
  • By sequencing T cell receptors from various compartments it could be shown that RE patients present with peripheral CD8+ T-cell expansion which in some cases have been proven for years after disease onset. (wikipedia.org)
  • White matter degeneration is associated with and makes differential diagnoses out of other adult onset leukodystrophies such as metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), Krabbe disease (globoid cell leukodystrophy), and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ADL). (wikipedia.org)
  • rare
  • Current researchers in the field believe that more in depth analysis and comparison of the two genetic abnormalities in these disorders could lead to a better understanding of the disease mechanisms in these rare disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumor
  • As the two journeys to an unknown location, Olegario tells Santino that he needs him to heal his son who has a brain tumor allowing his son to only have a shorter life. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tournament, which benefits brain tumor research, is a competition among 30 teams representing the top neurosurgical institutes from across the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells of the tumor will often grow into nearby normal brain tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hal's wife Melinda has an inoperable brain tumor, which John cures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood Brain B
  • Dr. Skovronsky established Avid Radiopharmaceuticals in July 2005 with the goal of finding a dye that could be injected into the body, would cross the blood-brain barrier and attach itself to amyloid protein deposits in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • retinal
  • Fink was a Principal Investigator of the United States Department of Energy's (USDOE's) "Artificial Retina" project (2004-2011), a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary CRADA-based effort to develop an implantable microelectronic retinal device that restores useful vision to people blinded by retinal diseases (Retinitis pigmentosa and Macular degeneration). (wikipedia.org)
  • Both patients underwent fluorescein retinal angiography that demonstrated multifocal retinal artery occlusions without evidence of embolic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of refractile or non-refractile yellow Gass plaques in the retinal arterioles is near pathognomonic for the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Finally, just to throw something new on the fire, a March 2010 Duke University Medical Center study found that "increased consumption of high fructose corn syrup was associated with scarring in the liver, or fibrosis, among patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). (thecrunchychicken.com)
  • Recently, a team led by Stanford University scientists, published a clinical research paper on a brain-to-computer interface (BCI) that paralyzed patients can use to communicate. (labroots.com)
  • These patients bravely volunteered to have small electrode arrays surgically implanted in the motor cortices of their brains. (labroots.com)
  • Neurorehabilitation is the culmination of many different fields to provide the best care and education for patients with injuries or diseases affecting their nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 1 in 5 MSA patients will fall in their first year of disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • individuals
  • If long-term care eventually becomes necessary, there are three Hartwyck Nursing, Convalescent and Rehabilitation centers within JFK Health, one of which is the first dedicated unit for individuals with Huntington's disease in New Jersey. (jfkmc.org)
  • Individuals with sickle cell anemia, compressed blood vessels, ventricular tachycardia, plaque buildup in the arteries, blood clots, extremely low blood pressure as a result of heart attack, and congenital heart defects have a higher predisposition to brain ischemia in comparison their healthy counterparts. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerve
  • The protein plays a key role in brain development and nerve function, though researchers aren't yet certain exactly how the lack of FMRP protein leads to fragile X. However, they do know the protein is involved in synaptic plasticity, which means it plays a role in learning and memory. (wisc.edu)
  • Brain and Nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • illness
  • When a patient is completely paralyzed, as sometimes happens after a brain injury or illness, communication can be difficult if not impossible. (labroots.com)
  • He stated: "This is the original Ebola virus that she had many months ago, which has been lying inside the brain, replicating at a very low level probably, and has now re-emerged to cause this clinical illness of meningitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessel
  • Intravascular therapeutic Microbot Lab - Microrobot moving controlled through blood vessel for drug delivery and treatment of coronary artery disease such as CTO(chronic total occlusion) and thrombus. (wikipedia.org)
  • degeneration
  • This is caused by progressive degeneration of neurons in several parts of the brain including the substantia nigra, striatum, inferior olivary nucleus, and cerebellum. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • Sickle cell anemia may cause brain ischemia associated with the irregularly shaped blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cause of MSA is uncertain and no specific risk factor has been identified, although research indicates that a prion form of the alpha-synuclein protein may cause the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • Later studies on a control group member without the disease did not find plaque, confirming the reliability of the compound in diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Chronic mastoiditis, also called chronic tympanomastoiditis or chronic suppurative otitis media, is an inflammatory disease of the mastoid and middle ear that often presents with chronic drainage from the ear and hearing loss. (neurologyadvisor.com)
  • areas
  • Fink is a specialist in the areas of autonomous systems, biomedical engineering for healthcare, human/brain-machine interfaces, and smart service systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multiple
  • These terms and their distinctions have been dropped in recent (1996 onwards) medical usage and replaced with MSA and its subtypes, but are helpful to understanding the older literature about this disease: The current terminology and diagnostic criteria for the disease were established at a 2007 conference of experts on the disease and set forth in the "Second consensus statement on the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Scientific studies have found that the three fatty acids found in Efalex, arachidonic acid, gamma linolenic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid all play a pivotal role in the development of brain and eye functions as well as help with learning ability, coordination, and even help alleviate conditions such as night blindness. (comunicati.net)
  • death
  • The participants and their families agreed that they would undergo the PET scans and would have their brains autopsied after their death by pathologists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Focal brain ischemia reduces blood flow to a specific brain region, increasing the risk of cell death to that particular area. (wikipedia.org)
  • When they return to the Mile, John passes the "disease" from Melinda into Percy, causing him to go mad and shoot Wharton to death before falling into a catatonic state from which he never recovers. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • The prognosis after recovery from Ebola virus disease can include joint pains, muscular pain, skin peeling, or hair loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • The first patient underwent brain biopsy, which revealed sclerosis of the media and adventitia of small pial and cortical vessels, suggestive of a healed angiitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • When blood in the joint is broken down by enzymes in the body, the bone in that area is also degraded, this exerts a lot of pain upon the person afflicted with the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • show
  • Since the disease was first described by Dr. Alois Alzheimer in 1906, the only certain way to determine if a person indeed had the disease was to perform an autopsy on the patient's brain to find distinctive spots on the brain that show the buildup of amyloid plaque. (wikipedia.org)
  • Functional and biochemical evidences to show toxic effect on the brain, liver and striated muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • possible
  • This suggests a possible systemic component of this disease, despite the predominance of central nervous system features. (wikipedia.org)
  • development
  • Do you know what supplements are good for your brain and eye development? (comunicati.net)
  • Using bacteria with the abilities such as active movement, fluorescence expression, recombination and replication) Telesurgical robot for brain surgery Lab - Development of an Articulated multi-DOF Manipulator for Minimal Invasive Surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Accordingly, this discovery raised the possibility of intervening after brain ischemia before the damage becomes irreversible. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, if a significant amount of time passes before restoration, brain damage may be permanent. (wikipedia.org)
  • rates
  • Tuberculosis (TB) disease rates in some parts of London are as high as in Sub-Saharan Africa, and drug-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Ischemia leads to alterations in brain metabolism, reduction in metabolic rates, and energy crisis. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • In the brains of the study volunteers, these signals were picked up by the electrode arrays and transmitted to the computer. (labroots.com)
  • older
  • As the omega-3 fatty acids build up in your system with regular use, your brain and eyes will have constant protection, ensuring that they stay in proper working order into your older years. (comunicati.net)
  • function
  • Flora Efamol Efalex Softgel is an all-natural supplement which helps support all aspects of brain and eye function. (comunicati.net)