• chronic
  • On the other hand, a patient with a chronic hepatic disease can suffer an acute decompensation of liver function following a precipitating event such as variceal bleeding, sepsis and excessive alcohol intake among others that can lead to a condition referred to as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • While the study population is small, the findings highlight the risks posed by repeated blows to the head in sports and athletic leagues other than the National Football League, which has received criticism over what critics consider the league's insufficient response to evidence of former players developing - and sometimes dying from - severe brain diseases. (courthousenews.com)
  • In 1953, Olds and Milner published findings implicating a brain region, specifically a cluster of dopamine neurons, with reward-based learning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Huntington's
  • The other category of movement disorder resulting from damage to the basal ganglia, hyperkinesia, features an exaggeration of unwanted motion, like twitching or writhing in Huntington's disease or Tourette syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Our study demonstrates that ghrelin actually activates certain regions of the brain to be more responsive to visual food cues, thereby enhancing the hedonic and incentive responses to food-related cues," neurologist Dr. Alain Dagher, principal investigator in the study, says in a press release. (macleans.ca)
  • Of the 35 professional football players' brains donated, only one had no evidence of the disease, according to the study. (slashdot.org)
  • We found (the tau) in their brains, it lit up," said Dr. Gary Small, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and lead author of the study, published Tuesday in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. (cnn.com)
  • Boston University's center for study of the disease reported last month that 34 former pro players and nine who played only college football suffered from CTE. (nwherald.com)
  • The National Institutes of Health in Maryland conducted the study, analyzing three unidentified brains. (unionleader.com)
  • degeneration
  • The disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, typically strikes people in their 30s and 40s and causes degeneration of the cerebellum, the part of the brain that helps coordinate movement. (northwestern.edu)
  • If you give VEGF early in the disease, you prevent degeneration later in life," said Puneet Opal , M.D., associate professor of neurology and of cell and molecular biology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a neurologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital , who also treats ataxic patients. (northwestern.edu)
  • insufficiency
  • The condition is part of a larger group of diseases related to thiamine insufficiency, including beriberi in all its forms, and Korsakoff syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hepatocytes that perform these tasks can be killed or impaired by disease, resulting in hepatic insufficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood-brain b
  • This unique breakdown in the blood-brain barrier is partially compensated for by the presence of a tanycyte barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • The area postrema's position outside of the blood-brain barrier makes this particular region of the medulla a key player in the autonomic control of various physiological systems, including the cardiovascular system and the systems controlling feeding and metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients
  • Because patients are born with the mutation for the disease but don't show signs of it until midlife, Opal said that indicates the aging process appears to play a role in development of the disease. (northwestern.edu)
  • develops
  • A blood clot suddenly develops in an artery or is formed elsewhere in another artery and breaks off and lodges in the brain blood vessels, blocking blood flow and causing a stroke. (webmd.com)
  • An artery in the brain develops a weak area that swells like a balloon. (webmd.com)
  • There is a suggestion that some specific parts of the brain may shrink as a person develops PTSD," he said. (psychcentral.com)
  • Darwin would have you losing to these guys since by the time their disease develops they have already slept with plenty of desirable women. (slashdot.org)
  • lesion
  • Consistent intoxication (ie excess use of alcohol and drugs) may also cause a lesion in the brain, eventually leading to POS. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers
  • Despite having normal cognitive function, his brain scan also showed tau build-up, the researchers said. (yahoo.com)
  • Researchers say they found tau protein in the brains of five living retired National Football League players with varying levels of cognitive and emotional problems. (cnn.com)
  • Nervous System
  • Its privileged location in the brain also allows the area postrema to play a vital role in the control of autonomic functions by the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aside from this crucial role, the remainder of tryptophan is primarily metabolized along the kynurenine pathway in most tissues, including those of the brain and central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • repeatedly
  • Not to be cruel but its not like we all didn't already know getting your brain bashed repeatedly was bad for you, hell look at boxing, not even a helmet there and we have seen so many old boxers drooling on themselves from brain damage it isn't even funny. (slashdot.org)
  • As opposed to the common theory that these diseases stem from repeatedly heading the ball, co-lead author Huw Morris attributes head injuries in soccer to situations in which players crash into each other. (courthousenews.com)
  • cerebrospinal
  • Serotonin levels in human brain is measured indirectly by sampling cerebrospinal fluid for its main metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid, or by measuring the serotonin precursor, tryptophan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Concussions
  • His family filed a wrongful-death suit against the NFL, claiming the league didn't do enough to prevent or treat the concussions that severely damaged his brain. (nwherald.com)
  • humans
  • Cornell geneticist Teresa Gunn displays a mahoganoid mutant mouse, a possible animal model for brain disease in humans. (innovations-report.com)
  • Specifically, this tradition postulates that the chemical compounds humans seek out increase brain dopamine levels and thereby effectively usurp the mesolimbic pathway, a system originally intended to motivate/reward fitness enhancing behaviors such as those that increase access to food and sex. (wikipedia.org)
  • athletes
  • Of the 85 brains donated by the families of deceased veterans and athletes with histories of repeated head trauma, they found CTE in 68 of them . (slashdot.org)
  • CN) - The risk of developing serious brain diseases among athletes of sports other than football could be more significant than previously expected, after new research shows signs of such issues in the brains of six deceased soccer players. (courthousenews.com)
  • The NFL, both directly and in partnership with the NIH, Centers for Disease Control and other leading organizations, is committed to supporting a wide range of independent medical and scientific research that will both address CTE and promote the long-term health and safety of athletes at all levels. (nwherald.com)
  • scientists
  • Research Hubs gather together scientists and clinicians focusing on a specific subject or disease, integrating various scientific and medical disciplines. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • However, as the clinical acceptance and awareness of the disorder evolves, experts are now wondering if PTSD is a brain disorder that can affect multiple parts of the body and cause lifelong illnesses. (psychcentral.com)
  • Elevated levels of tryptophan are also seen in Hartnup disease, a disorder of amino acid transport. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • We're constantly being told to put on sunscreen to protect out skin - but could it doing damage to our brains in the meantime? (foxnews.com)
  • This failure in diagnosis of WE and thus treatment of the disease leads to death in approximately 20% of cases, while 75% are left with permanent brain damage associated with WKS. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • You can heal the injury but the brain is still affected in some people. (psychcentral.com)
  • This supports the view, the press release notes, that "obesity must be understood as a brain disease and that hunger should also be looked at as a kind of food addiction," as obese people might be overeating largely due to an uncontrollable hunger. (macleans.ca)
  • The results showed FDDNP levels were higher in the brains of the former NFL players compared with healthy people. (yahoo.com)
  • He thinks his EEG can readily help in finding the neural tipping point at which people with mild cognitive impairment switch over to Alzheimer's, in the hopes of catching the disease in its early stages. (forbes.com)
  • suicide
  • Several National Football League players who have committed suicide, including Junior Seau and Dave Duerson , were later found to have the disease. (yahoo.com)
  • But pretty immediately (after the suicide) doctors were trying to get their hands on Junior's brain to examine it. (nwherald.com)
  • cognitive
  • Disruptions during the rapid eye movement (REM) stage which plays a role in a child's brain development, can potentially contribute to cognitive behavioral problems. (forbes.com)
  • examine
  • If you can examine how a brain reacts physiologically, it could greatly simplify drug trials," says Andrew Leuchter, a psychiatrist at UCLA. (forbes.com)
  • signs
  • Though each of the brains with CTE also had signs of Alzheimer's, the team cautions that the relationship between the two diseases remains unclear. (courthousenews.com)
  • Before shooting himself, Duerson, a former Chicago Bears defensive back, left a note asking that his brain be studied for signs of trauma. (nwherald.com)
  • areas
  • If that's the case, there may be treatment approaches based on the affected areas of the brain. (psychcentral.com)
  • Levels were elevated in brain areas involved in emotional control, as well as learning, memory and behavior. (yahoo.com)
  • It is a precursor to GABA, glutamate, and glycine in certain brain areas, and it acts on the GHB receptor and it is a weak agonist at the GABAB receptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • There is now firm evidence that some engineered nanoparticles entering intravenously or via lungs can reach the brains of small animals," said Professor Vyvyan Howard, a pathologist and toxicologist, who is working on the project. (foxnews.com)
  • It's different from Alzheimer's," said Small, director of the UCLA Longevity Center, adding that he found tau in deeper structures of the brain. (cnn.com)
  • reward
  • Drugs of abuse were later discovered to increase dopamine in the region of the brain associated with reward-based-learning (see: brain stimulation reward). (wikipedia.org)