• Alzheimer's
  • London, UK, 24 November 2010 - Research from the Laboratory of Psychiatry and Experimental Alzheimers Research ( http://www2.i-med.ac.at/psychlab/ ) at the Medical University Innsbruck (Austria) demonstrated that chronic high fat cholesterol diet in rats exhibited pathologies similar to Alzheimer's disease. (elsevier.com)
  • A third hypothesis suggests that chronic long-lasting mild cerebrovascular damage, including inflammatory processes and oxidative stress, may cause Alzheimer's disease. (elsevier.com)
  • After 5 months animals were tested for behavioral impairments and pathological markers similar to those found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. (elsevier.com)
  • 5, 347-360, 2004) support the view that Alzheimer's disease can be considered as a vascular disease and that a dysfunctional clearance of beta-amyloid from brain to blood and vice versa may be a secondary important step in the cascade of initiation of the disease. (elsevier.com)
  • Many of alcohol 's effects on the brain and behaviour are similar to cerebral-vascular dementia, the second most common form of *dementia, which reduces blood flow to the brain and affects thinking and reasoning more than memory, as Alzheimer's disease does. (drugs-forum.com)
  • frontal lobe
  • Imaging studies show that while long-term heavy drinking affects the entire brain, the greatest damage occurs in the frontal lobe that controls executive function, which includes planning, controlling impulses and modifying behaviour. (drugs-forum.com)
  • researchers
  • The researchers analyzed human brains - from teenagers and young adults who had been exposed to mild head impact but died from another cause soon after. (wksu.org)
  • Researchers report that mice exposed to prolonged stress develop structural changes in the amygdala, a part of the brain that regulates basic emotions, such as fear and anxiety. (nutritionreview.org)
  • University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers have found a two-way link between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intestinal changes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers have known for years that TBI has significant effects on the gastrointestinal tract, but until now, scientists have not recognized that brain trauma can make the colon more permeable, potentially allowing allow harmful microbes to migrate from the intestine to other areas of the body, causing infection. (eurekalert.org)
  • severe
  • Atypically structured, vacuolating cytopathic stealth viruses exist and can induce multi-system illnesses, including severe brain disease. (prohealth.com)
  • In cases of severe brain injuries, the likelihood of areas with permanent disability is great, including neurocognitive deficits, delusions (often, to be specific, monothematic delusions), speech or movement problems, and intellectual disability. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • These interactions may contribute to increased infections in these patients, and may also worsen chronic brain damage. (eurekalert.org)
  • Some patients may have linear or depressed skull fractures.If intracranial hemorrhage occurs, a hematoma within the skull can put pressure on the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ronald J. Ross is a Cleveland, Ohio radiologist known for research on brain injury in professional and amateur boxers and for the first clinical use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR later known as MRI) on human patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • injuries
  • Brain injuries occur due to a wide range of internal and external factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • A common category with the greatest number of injuries is traumatic brain injury (TBI) following physical trauma or head injury from an outside source, and the term acquired brain injury (ABI) is used in appropriate circles to differentiate brain injuries occurring after birth from injury, from a genetic disorder, or from a congenital disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of brain injuries vary based on the severity of the injury or how much of the brain is affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of brain injuries can also be influenced by the location of the injury and as a result impairments are specific to the part of the brain affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Concussions are injuries to the head which cause a temporary lapse in the normal operation of brain function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Head injuries include both injuries to the brain and those to other parts of the head, such as the scalp and skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain injuries may be diffuse, occurring over a wide area, or focal, located in a small, specific area. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the impact causes the head to move, the injury may be worsened, because the brain may ricochet inside the skull causing additional impacts, or the brain may stay relatively still (due to inertia) but be hit by the moving skull (both are contrecoup injuries). (wikipedia.org)
  • lesions
  • citation needed] Other lesions to the visual cortex have different effects depending on the location of the damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lesions to V1, for example, can cause blindsight in different areas of the brain depending on the size of the lesion and location relative to the calcarine fissure. (wikipedia.org)
  • alcoholic
  • The very part of the brain that you need to change your alcoholic intake may be most impacted by drinking," says Catherine Fortier, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, who has led many of the imaging studies . (drugs-forum.com)
  • rats
  • The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • liver
  • UC-MSCs have been widely used to treat Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, traumatic brain injury, aplastic anemia, and decompensated liver disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Normal functioning of the kidney, brain, liver, heart, and numerous other systems can be affected by exposure to uranium, a toxic metal. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Not surprisingly, most symptoms of withdrawal are symptoms that occur when the brain is overstimulated (Drugs.com). (wikipedia.org)
  • There has been significant advancement in understanding the structural changes that occur in parts of the brain involved in the reward pathway (mesolimbic system) that underlies addiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain injury can occur at the site of impact, but can also be at the opposite side of the skull due to a contrecoup effect (the impact to the head can cause the brain to move within the skull, causing the brain to impact the interior of the skull opposite the head-impact). (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • CTE is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by that kind of abnormal accumulation around small blood vessels in the brain. (wksu.org)
  • regulates
  • Long-term alcohol abuse also changes how the brain regulates emotion and anxiety and disrupts sleep systems, creating wide-ranging effects on the body. (drugs-forum.com)
  • tissues
  • The cytopathic changes seen in stealth virus cultures correlate well with the vacuolating cellular damage observed on histological sections of brain tissues obtained on biopsy and on autopsy. (prohealth.com)
  • concussions
  • A study published online Thursday in Brain , a journal of neurology, presents the strongest case yet that repetitive hits to the head that don't lead to concussions -meaning no loss of consciousness or other symptoms that can include headaches, dizziness, vision problems or confusion - cause CTE. (wksu.org)
  • While the study downplays the role of concussions in the ultimate development of CTE, the familiar symptoms - headaches, fogginess or problems with concentration, memory, balance and coordination, even without a loss of consciousness, are still important signs the brain has been hurt. (wksu.org)
  • acute
  • Repeated acute intoxication followed by acute withdrawal is associated with profound behavioural changes and neurobiological alterations in several brain regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The actual level of acute and chronic toxicity of DU is also controversial. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurodegenerative
  • Studies have demonstrated that quinolinic acid may be involved in many psychiatric disorders, neurodegenerative processes in the brain, as well as other disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • changes
  • These brain changes are linked to poor behavioural control and impulsivity, which tend to worsen the existing addiction problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Damage to the Broca's area typically produces symptoms like omitting functional words (agrammatism), sound production changes, dyslexia, dysgraphia, and problems with comprehension and production. (wikipedia.org)
  • These structural changes only last 7-10 days, however, indicating that the VTA cannot be the only part of the brain that is affected by drug use, and changed during the development of addiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contingent administration of drugs has been shown to produce larger structural changes in certain parts of the brain, in comparison to non-contingent administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • But what this study says is: No, that hit probably wasn't fine, and that poor guy can't feel the damage that's happening in his brain right now. (wksu.org)
  • ROSEMONT, IL A study published online today in Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach provides a different take on previous information regarding the prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players. (bio-medicine.org)
  • however the majority of the individuals in our study had no clinical signs of chronic brain damage to the degree that has been noted in previous studies," said lead author and neurologist, Ira R. Casson, MD of the Long Island Jewish Medical Center, in New Hyde Park, New York and the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Chronic stress makes us worn-out, anxious, depressed, and according to a new study, causes damage to critical brain neurons. (nutritionreview.org)
  • Furthermore
  • Furthermore, quinolinic acid has been shown to play a role in destabilization of the cytoskeleton within astrocytes and brain endothelial cells, contributing to the degradation of the BBB, which results in higher concentrations of quinolinic acid in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • The symptoms of Wernicke's aphasia are caused by damage to the posterior section of the superior temporal gyrus. (wikipedia.org)
  • amygdala
  • When we took a closer look at three regions within it, we found that neurons within one, the medial amygdala, retract as a result of chronic stress. (nutritionreview.org)
  • The brain's limbic system controls emotions and memory, and is comprised of a number of structures, including the amygdala, which are located deep in the brain. (nutritionreview.org)
  • dementia
  • Low levels of alcohol may improve blood flow to the brain - but there's a tension between that and reduced white matter," says Ian Lang, a dementia expert and senior lecturer in public health at the University of Exeter medical school in England. (drugs-forum.com)
  • disorders
  • While this rewiring of brain architecture can contribute to disorders such as anxiety and depression, their experiments also showed that the neurological and behavioral effects of stress can be prevented with treatment by a common nutritional supplement, acetyl L-carnitine (ALC). (nutritionreview.org)
  • long-term
  • Now, brain imaging is revealing how long-term alcohol abuse can change the structure of the brain, shrinking grey-matter cells in areas that govern learning, memory, decision-making and social behaviour, as well as damaging white-matter fibres that connect one part of the brain with others. (drugs-forum.com)
  • These results really underscore the importance of bi-directional gut-brain communication on the long-term effects of TBI," said Dr. Faden. (eurekalert.org)
  • function
  • Also unclear is whether heavy drinking during a person's teens and 20s, when important brain connections are still forming, has a lasting effect on brain function in later life. (drugs-forum.com)
  • This view believes there is a bodily function in the brain causing the addiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • View attachment 47799 Here's a sobering thought for the Christmas holidays: chronic heavy drinking can cause insidious damage to the brain, even in people who never seem intoxicated or obviously addicted. (drugs-forum.com)
  • It is possible in some cases that alcohol abuse via a kindling mechanism can cause the development of a chronic substance-induced psychotic disorder, i.e. schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists
  • When the scientists later repeated the stress experiment they treated mice nearing the end of their 21 days of chronic stress with acetyl L-carnitine, a nutritional compound derived from the amino acid, lysine. (nutritionreview.org)
  • mice
  • Lapin followed up this research by demonstrating that quinolinic acid could induce convulsions when injected into mice brain ventricles. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed
  • citation needed] Most research has focused on two portions of the brain: the ventral tegmental area, (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). (wikipedia.org)
  • loss
  • The loss of connections like these can harm the brain, distorting its ability to adapt to new experiences, leaving it trapped in a state of anxiety or depression. (nutritionreview.org)
  • found
  • They found early evidence of brain pathology consistent with what is seen in CTE, including abnormal accumulation of tau protein. (wksu.org)
  • development
  • Adolescence, particularly early adolescence, is a developmental stage which is particularly vulnerable to the neurotoxic and neurocognitive adverse effects of binge drinking due to it being a time of significant brain development. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • These cells are similar to brain astroglial cells, and both types of glial cells are activated after TBI. (eurekalert.org)
  • Quinolinic acid is unable to pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and must be produced within the brain microglial cells or macrophages that have passed the BBB. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health
  • This programme will provide the evidence-base for the National Health System (NHS) policy on the use of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain for preterm infants. (clinicaltrials.gov)