• arteries
  • The aim of this study was to assess the effects of type 2 diabetes on blood flow velocities (BFVs) in the middle cerebral arteries and to determine the relationship between white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and BFVs. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • In the uterine arteries the pulsatility index was highest on day + 2, after which it decreased successively to its lowest value, whereas the time-averaged maximum velocity reached its. (lu.se)
  • Animal research from the Russian Bion-M1 mission indicates duress of the cerebral arteries may induce reduced blood flow, thereby contributing to impaired vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • By compressing the surface veins, arteries and muscles, they force circulating blood through narrower channels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood pressure in the arteries supplying the body is a result of the work needed to pump the cardiac output (the flow of blood pumped by the heart) through the vascular resistance, usually termed total peripheral resistance by physicians and researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The up and down fluctuation of the arterial blood pressure is due to the pulsatile nature of the cardiac output and determined by the interaction of the stroke volume versus the volume and elasticity of the major arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell velocity
  • Abrupt decline in red cell velocity and, in many cases, a momentary cessation or reverse of flow, was observed in these microvessels during the pre-ejection period. (ahajournals.org)
  • During vasodilation following dilazep (50 micrograms/kg, i.v.), an adenosine potentiator, red cell velocity increased throughout the entire cardiac cycle in epimyocardial microvessels with significant increases in the total area under the velocity curves accompanied by significant dilation of the arterioles. (ahajournals.org)
  • measurements
  • The approach has been thoroughly investigated using both simulations, flow rig measurements, and in-vivo validation against MR scans. (dtu.dk)
  • citation needed] In classical mechanics, accurate measurements and predictions of the state of objects can be calculated, such as location and velocity. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1963, Dr. William Bruce, aware of the tendency of people with coronary artery disease to experience angina (cardiac chest discomfort) during exercise, developed the first standardized method of "stressing" the heart, where serial measurements of changes in blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiographic (ECG/EKG) changes could be measured under "stress-stress" conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • left atrial
  • citation needed] When the mitral valve area goes less than 1 cm2, there will be an increase in the left atrial pressures (required to push blood through the stenotic valve). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thrombosis
  • To evaluate the haemodynamic changes induced by flow diversion treatment in cerebral aneurysms, resulting in thrombosis or persisting aneurysm patency over time. (epfl.ch)
  • Relative flow velocity and WSS reduction in and of itself may result in aneurysm thrombosis in the majority of cases. (epfl.ch)
  • Compression stockings are recommended under the following conditions: Tired, aching legs occur when the blood flow slows down in the legs (can be an indicator of deep vein thrombosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep vein thrombosis occurs when blood flow decreases (especially in the lower extremities), causing blood to pool in the legs and leading to blood clot (thrombus) formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterioles
  • The muscular contraction of arterioles is targeted by drugs that lower blood pressure (antihypertensives), for example the dihydropyridines (nifedipine and nicardipine), which block the calcium conductance in the muscular layer of the arterioles, causing relaxation. (wikipedia.org)
  • estimation
  • This includes synthetic aperture imaging using either spherical or plane waves with velocity estimation performed with directional beamforming or speckle tracking. (dtu.dk)
  • A method for extending the 2D TO method to 3D vector velocity estimation is presented and the implications for future vector velocity imagi- g is indicated. (dtu.dk)
  • haemodynamics
  • Pre- and post-treatment haemodynamics were compared, including mean and maximal velocities, wall-shear stress (WSS) and intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. (epfl.ch)
  • patterns
  • Changes in flow patterns were recorded in only one case. (epfl.ch)
  • One aneurysm remaining patent after 1 year showed no change in flow patterns. (epfl.ch)
  • With a digital signal, it becomes possible to study the patterns of the blood flow moving inside the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • drainage
  • Changes in cerebral artery blood flow velocity after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid drainage. (bmj.com)
  • Lymphedema occurs when a body part swells due to an abnormal accumulation of lymph fluid, occurring when there is interference with the normal drainage of lymph fluid back into the blood, commonly swelling the arm, leg, neck or abdomen. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • Analysis of the blood flow velocity in the forearm was made in comparison to established methods of estimating endothelial function, clinical markers of cardiovascular risk, the Framingham risk score and global atherosclerosis determined by whole body magnetic resonance angiography. (diva-portal.org)
  • diastole
  • In normal cardiac physiology, the mitral valve opens during left ventricular diastole, to allow blood to flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The result is that the left ventricle gets filled with blood during early ventricular diastole, with only a small portion of extra blood contributed by contraction of the left atrium (the "atrial kick") during late ventricular diastole. (wikipedia.org)
  • changes
  • We conclude that the blood circulation in the uterus and in the dominant ovary changes considerably during the menstrual cycle, whereas that in the non-dominant ovary shows no unequivocal changes. (lu.se)
  • Similar to other neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), fTCD is based on a close coupling between regional cerebral blood flow changes and neural activation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Burtt conducted studies that emphasized the changes in quantitative systolic blood-pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Then in 1913 W.M. Marston determined systolic blood-pressure by oscillatory methods and his findings cite definite changes in blood pressure during the deception of criminal suspects. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1921, John Augustus Larson criticized Marston's intermittent blood pressure method because emotional changes were so brief they could be lost. (wikipedia.org)
  • pressure
  • Other variables included core body temperature (CBT), end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2), blood pressure, and heart rate. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As a result, the arterial pressure is increased, which causes more blood to return to the heart and less blood to pool in the feet. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] When the mitral valve area goes below 2 cm2, the valve causes an impediment to the flow of blood into the left ventricle, creating a pressure gradient across the mitral valve. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cortisol levels will rise along with blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • William Moulton Marston studied blood-pressure and noted increase in systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or over indicated guilt through using the tycos sphygmomanometer, with which he reported 90-100% accuracy. (wikipedia.org)
  • To adjust for this he modified the Erlanger sphygmograph to give a continuous blood pressure and pulse curve and used it to study 4,000 criminals. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1854, he created a device called a sphygmograph, a mechanism consisting of weights and levers used to estimate blood pressure, and considered to be a forerunner of the modern sphygmomanometer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medications such as labetalol may be required to lower the blood pressure until repair can occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quantum
  • In the quantum mechanics, due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the complete state of a subatomic particle, such as its location and velocity, cannot be simultaneously determined. (wikipedia.org)
  • peripheral
  • Chronic peripheral venous insufficiency is when the veins cannot pump deoxygenated blood back to the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any pathology which constricts blood flow, such as stenosis, will increase total peripheral resistance and lead to hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • reductions
  • Flow reductions under aneurysm-specific thresholds may, however, be the reason why some aneurysms remain completely or partially patent after flow diversion. (epfl.ch)
  • indicate
  • These findings indicate that the phasic blood flow pattern is markedly different in the subepimyocardial microvessels from that in the large epicardial artery and the septal artery. (ahajournals.org)
  • Stroke
  • Battery-powered, it would use an RF link to a portable computer running a spectral analysis routine together with input from an oximeter (monitoring the degree of blood oxygenation, which a stroke might impair) to make the automatic decision to administer the drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • The immediate effect of atlanto-axial high velocity thrust techniques on blood flow in the vertebral artery: a randomized controlled trial [published online March 2, (jaoa.org)
  • This description of the intervention is similar to high-velocity, low-amplitude procedures. (jaoa.org)
  • Knee-high compression stockings are used not only to help increase circulation, but also to help prevent the formation of blood clots in the lower legs. (wikipedia.org)
  • or a localized high rate of blood flow through an unobstructed artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • veins
  • ECS occurs on long flights, due to traveler's inactivity, gravity, and cramped seating, and slows down the blood flow through veins. (wikipedia.org)