• organisms
  • Biological organisms are highly complex and are comprised of many different parts that function together to ensure the survival and reproduction of the whole. (eurekalert.org)
  • Understanding how the division of labor evolved in multicellular organisms is difficult because single cells are expected to act selfishly to protect their own existence instead of working cooperatively to achieve a more productive higher level of organization, explains author Sergey Gavrilets, Associate Director for Scientific Activities at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and a professor at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. (eurekalert.org)
  • Many biologists used to believe that evolution was progressive and had a direction that led towards so-called "higher organisms," despite a lack of evidence for this viewpoint. (wikipedia.org)
  • With selection, evolution can also produce more complex organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indeed, some computer models have suggested that the generation of complex organisms is an inescapable feature of evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evolution of metal ions in biological systems refers to the incorporation of metallic ions into living organisms and how it has changed over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • In particular, Auletta is interested in the relevance of notions like information control, functional equivalence class, formal constraints and top-down causation as to the organisms' capability of dealing with a challenging environment at the ontogenetic and epigenetic levels, eventually leading to the emergence of new biological functionalities at the phylogenetic level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approaches
  • As a contribution to the history of scientific investigations, we trace here a sequence of steps of conceptual and experimental approaches to understand microbial evolution at the molecular level. (mdpi.com)
  • An important new book by the author of the bestselling text Defending Evolution:A Guide to the Creation/Evolution Controversy, this title examines the controversial issues surrounding this central concept of life science and explores students' common scientific misconceptions, describes approaches for teaching topics and principles of evolution, and offers strategies for handling the various problems some students have with the idea of evolution due to religious influences. (abebooks.com)
  • Darwinian
  • 1) used an innovative Darwinian method to demonstrate the importance of consumers' preferences in shaping the evolution of music, a fact that has often been overlooked and deserved attention. (pnas.org)
  • 1 ) opens up a wide range of possible developments that invites further studies on the relative strength of transformative processes and Darwinian selection and on their role in shaping cultural evolution. (pnas.org)
  • Neo-Darwinism is the interpretation of Darwinian evolution through natural selection as it has variously been modified since it was first proposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanisms
  • Cultural evolution, the domain of research focused on how culture changes through time due to different individual transmission mechanisms and population-level effects, often uses models derived from population genetics, in which agents are passive recipients of cultural traits (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • fundamental
  • Their experimental design, however, emphasizes the role of selection at the expense of other fundamental features of human cultural evolution that need to be taken into account to study the evolution of real musical culture. (pnas.org)
  • fossil
  • This unique system also explains how major groups of animals rapidly appeared in the Cambrian explosion, and why so much history about evolution is missing from the fossil records. (physicsessays.org)
  • processes
  • These results show that frequent, nonrandom transformative processes, resulting from psychological biases, are crucial in models of cultural evolution, requiring a difference in emphasis from models inspired by biology, such as genetic algorithms. (pnas.org)
  • In this way, cultural evolution may be viewed as a particular kind of "scaling up" from the individual-level processes to population-level ones. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Theoretical and empirical results show that individuals actively transform and recombine information according to psychological biases and that these biases drive the evolution of culture ( 2 ), both in humans and nonhuman animals ( 3 ). (pnas.org)
  • natural selection
  • Everybody wants to say that evolution is equivalent to natural selection and that things that are sophisticated and complex have been absolutely selected for," said study co-author Ariel Fernández, PhD, a visiting scholar at the University of Chicago and senior researcher at the Mathematics Institute of Argentina (IAM) in Buenos Aires. (redorbit.com)
  • As part of the disagreement about whether natural selection alone was sufficient to explain speciation, George Romanes coined the term neo-Darwinism in 1895 to refer to the version of evolution advocated by Alfred Russel Wallace and August Weismann with its heavy dependence on natural selection. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the 1880s to the 1930s, the term continued to be applied to the panselectionist school of thought, which argued that natural selection was the main and perhaps sole cause of all evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • His main interests in quantum information led him to focus his further research on the way in which biological and cognitive systems deal with information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Particular
  • Indeed, as for all comparative methods, phylogenetic methods can integrate information from multiple genomes, and in particular integrate them using a model of evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • Polanyi emphasized the important role of information in biological phenomena but considered this notion as something alien to physics 3 . (springer.com)
  • systems
  • Metal ions have been associated with biological systems for billions of years, but only in the last century have scientists began to truly appreciate the scale of their influence. (wikipedia.org)
  • This pathway of research eventually led him to consider quantum information as a fruitful approach for studying the way in which biological and cognitive systems deal with information at all scales. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • Over four billion years of evolution, plants and animals grew far more complex than their single-celled ancestors. (redorbit.com)
  • Thought
  • I hope that it causes us to pause and think about how evolution operates in new ways that we haven't thought about before. (redorbit.com)
  • features
  • It is the only national natural areas program that identifies and recognizes the best examples of biological and geological features in both public and private ownership. (wikipedia.org)
  • culture
  • both factors need to be taken into account when trying to understand the evolution of real music, real language, and, more broadly, real culture ( 5 ). (pnas.org)
  • Gene-culture coevolution studies how culture and genetic evolution influence each other, ultimately shaping behavior, as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • One study has suggested that a single ancestral enzyme could have diverged into several families, while another suggests that a stable TIM-barrel structure has evolved through convergent evolution. (wikipedia.org)