• autoimmunity
  • In the absence of reliable T-cell tests, dissection of autoantibody responses in subjects of genetic risk should prove useful in identifying triggers of islet autoimmunity by examining seroconversion and maturation of the autoantibody response that may mark time to onset of type 1 diabetes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, celiac disease, and cerebellar ataxia with polyendocrine autoimmunity can be characterized by the presence of circulating autoantibodies. (aacc.org)
  • They also blunt autoantibody responses in lupus-prone mice, thereby alleviating lupus immunopathology and outline an important role of epigenetic modifications in the regulation of B cell differentiation in autoimmunity. (wikipedia.org)
  • isotypes
  • In the present article, we will discuss the mechanisms by which the autoantibodies to GAD65 (GAD65Ab), IA-2 (IA-2Ab), and insulin (IAA) appear, pathways of formation, shift between isotypes and subtypes, epitope recognition, and detection, as well as the potential usefulness of epitope-specific autoantibody tests to improve prediction and classification of autoimmune diabetes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • tissue
  • Some autoantibodies do not cause tissue injury directly but are thought to be part of an overall immune response that can cause inflammation and damage. (labcorp.com)
  • Autoantibodies and their corresponding autoantigens are intensively studied to provide clues to the understanding of disease initiation, tissue specificity, and propagation of hepatic autoimmune diseases. (omicsonline.org)
  • Some disorders, such as SLE may be more likely if several autoantibodies are present, while others, such as MCTD (mixed connective tissue disease) may be more likely if a single autoantibody, RNP - ribonucleic protein is the only one present. (wikipedia.org)
  • body's
  • Sometimes, the immune system ceases to recognize one or more of the body's normal constituents as "self," leading to production of pathological autoantibodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • organ
  • Disorders caused by autoantibodies that primarily affect a single organ, such as the thyroid in Graves disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis, are often easier to diagnose. (labcorp.com)
  • pemphigoid
  • Paraneoplastic pemphigoid is suggested to be a distinct entity from the group of bullous pemphigoid in view of the linear C3 deposits along the basement membrane of the perilesional skin and the "ladder" configuration of autoantibodies demonstrated by western blot analysis. (hindawi.com)
  • Pathogenicity of autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • patients
  • These autoantibodies are generally more prevalent in younger onset patients. (labcorp.com)
  • Other: Experimental studies observed that activating autoantibodies to the beta1/2-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors are associated with atrial tachyarrhythmias in patients with hyperthyroidism. (wikipedia.org)
  • serum
  • Objectives: To investigate the relationship between serum carbonic anhydrase I-II (CA-I and II) autoantibody levels and diabetic retinopathy (DRP) in cases with type 1 diabetes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • receptor
  • Adrenergic receptor autoantibodies The adrenergic receptors (or adrenoreceptors) are a class of cell membrane-bound protein receptors throughout the body that are targets of the catecholamines, especially norepinephrine(or noradrenaline) and epinephrine (or adrenaline). (wikipedia.org)
  • Beta1 autoantibodies trigger conformational changes in the receptor, attenuate receptor internalization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beta-1 adrenergic receptors are the primary receptor of the heart and, therefore, autoantibodies to these receptors have been tied to many different heart diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it has been proposed that both beta1-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and autoantibodies could be working together in the development of chronic heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Although there are few clinical implications resulting from this classification, autoantibody profiles indicate that AIH is a heterogenous group of entities. (omicsonline.org)
  • drug-induced
  • Many cases of encephalitis can be traced to infectious or drug-induced etiologies, but increasingly researchers have found that autoantibodies are involved. (aacc.org)
  • radioimmunoassay
  • 6. Greenbaum CJ, Palmer JP, Kuglin B, Kolb H. Insulin autoantibodies measured by radioimmunoassay methodology are more related to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus than those measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: Results of the Fourth International Workshop on the Standardization of Insulin Autoantibody Measurement. (labcorp.com)
  • A radioimmunoassay for the detection of adrenal autoantibodies. (biomedsearch.com)
  • type
  • Autoantibodies to IA 2 , a tyrosine phosphatase-like protein, are found in 50% to 75% of type 1 diabetics at and prior to disease onset. (labcorp.com)
  • Pinpointing islet autoantibodies associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) leads the way to project and deter this disease in the general population. (jove.com)
  • Diseases
  • Associated pathologies: Cardiovascular diseases and events: Circulating autoantibodies to adrenergic receptors have been identified in numerous heart diseases and cardiac symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • production
  • While there is not a direct link, it is thought that many cases of autoantibody production are due to a genetic predisposition combined with an environmental trigger, such as a viral illness or prolonged exposure to certain toxic chemicals. (labcorp.com)
  • While the exact pathophysiology of Chagas disease is not completely understood, some models have shown that an overstimulation of the immune system causes production of adrenergic autoantibodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The causes of autoantibody production are varied and not well understood. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is thought that some autoantibody production is due to a genetic predisposition combined with an environmental trigger, such as a viral illness or a prolonged exposure to certain toxic chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the initial event that leads to the production of autoantibodies is still unknown, there is a body of evidence that autoantibodies may have the capacity to maintain their production. (wikipedia.org)
  • This effect can also occur after an infection causes the production of autoantibodies to other structures within the nucleus. (wikipedia.org)