• Proteins
  • These results will help identify the lowest energy pathway for asparagine deamidation and will serve as a stepping stone for calculations on deamidation in proteins. (ugent.be)
  • metabolism
  • As a crucial building block in major biochemical pathways, asparagine is vital for the metabolism of ammonia in the liver, and it is also required in the formation of a numerous other molecules. (fsu.edu)
  • ammonia
  • Thus, after being released in, and channeled from, the glutaminase site, the ammonia molecule attacks the bound βAspAMP 1 to give asparagine and AMP via a tetrahedral intermediate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lack of ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase in eukaryotes is presumably because of the need to maintain cellular concentrations of ammonia at very low levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • reaction
  • It decomposes above 120 °C. Fructose-asparagine is formed when cooking food by way of the Maillard reaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to the transient response from these susceptible cancers in reaction to the asparagine depletion, tumor growth is significantly inhibited due to nutritional deficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • depletion
  • In individuals with the disability, the enzyme is not produced in sufficient quantity, and the resulting asparagine depletion affects the proliferation and survival of cells during brain development. (health24.com)
  • The particularly low-level expression of asparagine synthetase in primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and numerous ALL cell lines, as compared to that of normal cells, makes asparagine depletion an effective method of treatment due to the cells' unusual dependency on circulating serum asparagine as a necessary nutrition for growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • This depletion of serum asparagine leads to a subsequent rapid efflux of cellular asparagine, which is immediately acted upon and destroyed by the L-asparaginase as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pathway
  • Asparagine is not essential for humans, which means that it can be synthesized from central metabolic pathway intermediates and is not required in the diet. (wikipedia.org)
  • asparagus
  • Traditionally, the name of an amino acid is related to its discovery, and since asparagine was first purified from asparagus juice, it was given a similar name. (fsu.edu)
  • Asparagus contains the highest amount of asparagine, where the name comes from. (foodista.com)
  • Asparagine was first isolated in 1806 in a crystalline form by French chemists Louis Nicolas Vauquelin and Pierre Jean Robiquet (then a young assistant) from asparagus juice, in which it is abundant, hence the chosen name. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzymes
  • citation needed] The addition of N-acetylglucosamine to asparagine is performed by oligosaccharyltransferase enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum. (wikipedia.org)
  • diet
  • The cells of the body can do without it because they use asparagine provided through diet. (health24.com)
  • Although ordinarily obtained from a balanced diet, asparagine may be synthesized within the human body itself, and is therefore considered a nonessential amino acid. (fsu.edu)
  • Leads
  • citation needed] In bacteria, the degradation of asparagine leads to the production of oxaloacetate which is the molecule which combines with citrate in the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). (wikipedia.org)
  • dairy
  • Asparagine, found in foods such as meat, eggs, and dairy products , was until now considered non-essential because it is produced naturally by the body. (health24.com)
  • name
  • The systematic name of this enzyme class is L-asparagine:2-oxo-acid aminotransferase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The systematic name of this enzyme class is N-linked-glycopeptide-(N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminyl)-L-asparagine amidohydrolase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The systematic name of this enzyme class is GDP-L-fucose:glycoprotein (L-fucose to asparagine-linked N-acetylglucosamine of N4-{N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminyl-(1->2)-alpha-D-mannosyl-(1->3)-[N-a cetyl-beta-D-glucosaminyl-(1->2)-alpha-D-mannosyl-(1->6)]-beta-D-man nosyl-(1->4)-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminyl-(1->4)-N-acetyl-beta-D-glu cosaminyl}asparagine) 3-alpha-L-fucosyl-transferase. (wikipedia.org)