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  • arthropods
  • Arachnids are a class (Arachnida) of joint-legged invertebrate animals (arthropods), in the subphylum Chelicerata. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like all arthropods, arachnids have an exoskeleton, and they also have an internal structure of cartilage-like tissue, called the endosternite, to which certain muscle groups are attached. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many species of arthropods (insects, arachnids and others) regularly or occasionally bite or sting human beings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arthropods are major vectors of human disease, with the pathogens typically transmitted by bites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arthropodology (from Greek ἄρθρον - arthron, "joint", and πούς, gen.: ποδός - pous, podos, "foot", which together mean "jointed feet") is a biological discipline concerned with the study of arthropods, a phylum of animals that include the insects, arachnids, crustaceans and others that are characterized by the possession of jointed limbs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical arthropodology is the study of the parasitic effect of arthropods, not only as parasites but also as vectors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subfields of arthropodology are Arachnology - the study of spiders and other arachnids Entomology - the study of insects Carcinology - the study of crustaceans Myriapodology - the study of centipedes, millipedes, and other myriapods Journal of Arthropodology Arthropods portal Animals portal http://www.museumstuff.com/learn/topics/Arthropodology Etymology-Museum of Learning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paleontology portal History of science portal This list of fossil arthropods described in 2016 is a list of new taxa of trilobites, fossil insects, crustaceans, arachnids and other fossil arthropods of every kind that have been described during the year 2016, as well as other significant discoveries and events related to arthropod paleontology that occurred in the year 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • tick vectors
  • Monitoring of tick vectors and the pathogens they transmit, within the scope of epidemiological surveillance, is an important tool for better prevention and control of tick-borne diseases. (umk.pl)
  • pathogens
  • What is the Risk for Exposure to Vector-Borne Pathogens in United States National Parks? (cdc.gov)
  • We assessed the current state of knowledge for risk of exposure to vector-borne pathogens in national parks through a review of relevant literature, including internal National Park Service documents and organismal databases. (cdc.gov)
  • Aedes
  • On the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the vector of Zika virus, only one repellent that did not contain DEET had a strong effect for the duration of the 240 minutes test: a lemon eucalyptus oil repellent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aedes canadensis, the woodland pool mosquito, is an aggressive, day biting mosquito that can be a vector of a number of diseases which is found mainly in eastern North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • The viruses which transmit Eastern equine encephalitis, California encephalitis and West Nile virus have been detected in samples of Aedes canadensis and have also been shown to be a vector of dog heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1986). "Aedes canadensis: A vector of Lacrosse virus (Caligornia Serogroup) in Ohio" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • transmit
  • These differences, combined with the fact that plants are immobile, have resulted in plant viruses relying on the wind and soil to transmit seeds as well as vectors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vectors either transmit the virus propagative transmission, which results in an amplification of the virus by replication within the cells of the vector, or non-propagative transmission which simply carries the virus between the plants without viral replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • The planet's inhabitants, called "Spiders" by the humans for their resemblance to arachnids, have reached a stage of technological development very similar to that of Earth's humans in the early 20th century, although humans believe that they may once have been capable of space travel. (wikipedia.org)
  • soil
  • These tiny arachnids play many ecological roles including acting as vectors of disease, vital players in soil formation, and important agents of biological control. (indigo.ca)
  • include
  • The excretory glands of arachnids include up to four pairs of coxal glands along the side of the prosoma, and one or two pairs of Malpighian tubules, emptying into the gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Thus, EpiCenter could be used to monitor disease vector populations during extraordinary circumstances in areas where the capacity for traditional trapping methods is not maintained. (hmsinc.com)
  • virus
  • However, the virus is dependent upon physical damage, generated naturally by the wind and feeding of vectors or by human intervention. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has also shown to be a secondary vector for the La Crosse virus in Ohio. (wikipedia.org)
  • A consequence of being transmitted by blood-sucking vectors is that the virus must spread systemically in the vertebrate host - unlike influenza viruses, which are transmitted by respiratory droplets and are usually confined to the respiratory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • A reception held by the Emergents doubles as a vector to infect the Qeng Ho with a timed "mindrot" virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • birds
  • In support of this theory, all stages of the tick vector Ornithodoros hermsi fed successfully on birds in the laboratory and advanced in their life cycle. (cdc.gov)
  • control
  • A. "Accredited veterinarian" means a licensed veterinarian approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Maryland Department of Agriculture.B. "Approved pesticide" means any pesticide which is recognized and approved by the Department or the U.S. Department of Agriculture as an effective agent in the control or eradication of possible insect or arachnid vectors of equine infectious anemia.C. "Department" means the Maryland Department of Agriculture. (md.us)