• acute appendicitis
  • In early acute appendicitis subserosal vessels are congested and there is a modest perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate within all layers of the wall The inflammatory reaction transforms the normal glistening serosa into a dull, granular, erythematous surface Diagnosis of acute appendicitis requires neutrophilic infiltration of the muscularis propria. (slideplayer.com)
  • Although mucosal neutrophils and focal superficial ulceration are often present, these are not specific markers of acute appendicitis. (slideplayer.com)
  • recurrent acute appendicitis does occur, often with complete resolution of inflammation and symptoms between attacks Recurrent acute appendicitis may also occur if a long appendiceal stump is left after initial appendectomy. (slideplayer.com)
  • abscesses
  • In severe cases a prominent neutrophilic exudate  serosal fibrinopurulent reaction  focal abscesses may form within the wall (acute suppurative appendicitis)  further appendiceal compromise areas of hemorrhagic ulceration and gangrenous necrosis that extends to the serosa (acute gangrenous appendicitis), which is often followed by rupture and suppurative peritonitis. (slideplayer.com)
  • Conclusions: No difference in the rate of postoperative intra-abdominal abscesses exists between laparoscopic and open appendectomy for perforated appendicitis. (semanticscholar.org)