• drugs
  • The commercially available antiulcer drugs usually have various side effects. (academicjournals.org)
  • Due to these side effects, there is a need to find new antiulcerogenic compound(s) with potentially less or no side effects and medicinal plants have always been the main source of new drugs for the treatment of gastric ulcer. (academicjournals.org)
  • Antiulcer therapies have made major advances in recent years with classes of drugs called histamine type 2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors . (planetdrugsdirect.com)
  • Proton pomp inhibitors, H2 receptor blockers and anti-acids are common drugs for treating dyspepsia in emergency department. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 2005). Metallotherapeutic Drugs and Metal-Based Diagnostic Agents: The Use of Metals in Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this time the United States military investigated it along with a wide range of possible nonlethal, psychoactive incapacitating agents including psychedelic drugs such as LSD and THC, dissociative drugs such as ketamine and phencyclidine, potent opioids such as fentanyl, as well as several glycolate anticholinergics. (wikipedia.org)
  • heals
  • An ulcer of the cornea heals by two methods: migration of surrounding epithelial cells followed by mitosis (dividing) of the cells, and introduction of blood vessels from the conjunctiva. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Refractory corneal ulcers are most commonly seen in diabetics and often occur in the other eye later. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most commonly metallopharmaceuticals are used as anticancer or antimicrobial agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • The agent commonly became known as "Buzz" because of this abbreviation and the effects it had on the mental state of the human volunteers intoxicated with it in research studies at Edgewood Arsenal in Maryland. (wikipedia.org)
  • mucosal
  • Thus, continuous generation of PGE2 by gastric mucosa is crucial for the maintenance of mucosal integrity and protection against ulcerogenic and necrotizing agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Several hundred plant genera are used medicinally mainly in the form of herbal preparation in indigenous system of medicine in different countries for the treatment of ulcers. (academicjournals.org)
  • A government-sponsored trial and clinical trials in Asia have concluded that both methods of treatment reduce rebleeding within 30 days after endoscopic treatments of peptic ulcers. (planetdrugsdirect.com)
  • Aceglutamide is used as a psychostimulant and nootropic, while aceglutamide aluminum is used in the treatment of ulcers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment of corneal ulcers includes topical antibiotic therapy to prevent infection, and pain medications, including topical atropine to stop spasms of the ciliary muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was then investigated for possible use in ulcer treatment, but was found unsuitable. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • Enzyme inhibitors - May cause increased levels of testosterone: Serzone, Prozac, Paxil (antidepressants), Sporanox, Diflucan, and other 'azole' antifungals, Tagamet (an anti-ulcer agent that can cause gynecomastia in men because of this effect). (wikipedia.org)
  • Corneal ulcers are extremely painful due to nerve exposure, and can cause tearing, squinting, and vision loss of the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other eye conditions can cause corneal ulcers, such as entropion, distichiasis, corneal dystrophy, and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye). (wikipedia.org)
  • Herpes virus cause a dendritic ulcer, which can recur and relapse over the lifetime of an individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • The location of the ulcer depends somewhat on the cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immune-mediated eye disease can cause ulcers at the border of the cornea and sclera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mechanisms
  • Literature from anaesthetic screenings led attention to the potential antiviral compound pyridylthioacetamide which after further examination pointed the focus on an anti-secretory compound with unknown mechanisms of action called timoprazole. (wikipedia.org)
  • Glucosamine is an amino-sugar that is known to stimulate glycoprotein synthesis and protective mechanisms of the gastric mucosa, thereby aiding in ulcer healing. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerve
  • Central ulcers are typically caused by trauma, dry eye, or exposure from facial nerve paralysis or exophthalmos. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Aceglutamide (brand name Neuramina), or aceglutamide aluminum (brand name Glumal), also known as acetylglutamine, is a psychostimulant, nootropic, and antiulcer agent that is marketed in Spain and Japan. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are also known as indolent ulcers or Boxer ulcers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In February 1998, the British Ministry of Defence accused Iraq of having stockpiled large amounts of a glycolate anticholinergic incapacitating agent known as Agent 15. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep
  • Deep ulcers extend into or through the stroma and can result in severe scarring and corneal perforation. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • The characteristic that makes BZ an incapacitating rather than a toxic chemical warfare agent is its high safety margin (ICt50/LCt50) of around 40-fold (range 32 to 384 fold). (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Corneal ulcers are a common human eye disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The U.S. Army tested BZ as well as other "psycho-chemical" agents on human subjects at Edgewood Arsenal in Maryland from 1955 to 1975, according to declassified documents. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • This type of ulcer is especially dangerous and can rapidly result in corneal perforation, if not treated in time. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemical
  • Cytoprotection is a process by which chemical compounds provide protection to cells against harmful agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1959 the United States Army showed significant interest in deploying it as a chemical warfare agent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Possible Long-Term Health Effects of Short-Term Exposure To Chemical Agents, Volume 2: Cholinesterase Reactivators, Psychochemicals and Irritants and Vesicants. (wikipedia.org)