• Abuse
  • In the hope of reducing opioid use, abuse, and overdoses, policymakers have focused on developing and promoting tamper-resistant or abuse-deterrent formulations (ADFs) that render diverted opioids unusable if individuals attempt to use them for nonmedical (i.e., recreational) purposes. (cato.org)
  • Like the federal government's promotion of abuse-deterrent alcohol a century ago, these efforts are producing unintended consequences, such as making legal pain relief unaffordable for many patients and possibly increasing morbidity and mortality. (cato.org)
  • Little evidence suggests that abuse-deterrent formulations of opioids are having the intended effect of reducing the opioid overdose death rate, and strong evidence suggests that they are contributing to the rise in heroin use and overdoses. (cato.org)
  • Federal and state policymakers should stop promoting abuse-deterrent opioids. (cato.org)
  • Today's efforts to promote abuse-deterrent opioids are reminiscent of government efforts to promote abuse-deterrent alcohol during the 1920s. (cato.org)
  • Although disulfiram remained the most common pharmaceutical treatment of alcohol abuse till the end of the 20th century, today it is often replaced or accompanied with newer drugs, primarily the combination of naltrexone and acamprosate, which directly attempt to address physiological processes in the brain associated with alcohol abuse. (wikipedia.org)
  • laws
  • A justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court wrote in 1985 that the state's alcohol laws were a "maze of obscure statutory language" and "confusing at best. (wikipedia.org)
  • This led Kentucky governor Steve Beshear to appoint a task force in summer 2012 to attempt to streamline the state's alcohol laws. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apart from the laws governing local option elections by which communities can determine whether alcoholic beverages can be sold at all, many aspects of the state's alcohol laws were called "perplexing" in a 2012 story in one of Kentucky's largest newspapers, the Lexington Herald-Leader. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arguments In Opposition Laws are deterrents. (wikipedia.org)
  • These laws are applied either in regulatory offenses enforcing social behaviour where minimal stigma attaches to a person upon conviction, or where society is concerned with the prevention of harm, and wishes to maximise the deterrent value of the offense. (wikipedia.org)
  • intake
  • About 5 to 10 minutes after alcohol intake, the patient may experience the effects of a severe hangover for a period of 30 minutes up to several hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Food containing xylitol increased bone density in rat studies, these results have generated interest in the sugar alcohol that would examine if it could be a human treatment for osteoporosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Officers may also then check for Vertical Gaze Nystagmus, which is used to test for high blood alcohol levels and/or the presence of certain drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • accidents
  • It is estimated that about one-third of alcohol-related deaths are due to accidents and another 14% are from intentional injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce
  • According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration alcohol-related crashes cause approximately $37 billion in damages annually.DUI and alcohol-related crashes produce an estimated $45 billion in damages every year. (wikipedia.org)
  • DUI and alcohol-related crashes produce an estimated $45 billion in damages every year. (wikipedia.org)
  • crime
  • Driving under the influence (DUI), or Driving while intoxicated (DWI), is the crime of driving a motor vehicle while impaired by alcohol or other drugs (including recreational drugs and those prescribed by physicians), to a level that renders the driver incapable of operating a motor vehicle safely. (wikipedia.org)
  • state
  • The confusion starts with licensing itself-the state issues more than 70 different types of licenses for alcohol sales. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • In the past, alcohol was believed to be a non-specific pharmacological agent affecting many neurotransmitter systems in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • person
  • Field sobriety tests are a battery of tests used by police officers to determine if a person suspected of impaired driving is intoxicated with alcohol or drugs. (wikipedia.org)