• Stress
  • Selye demonstrated that stress decreases adaptability of an organism and proposed to describe the adaptability as a special resource, adaptation energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic stress and a lack of coping resources available or used by an individual can often lead to the development of psychological issues such as delusions, depression and anxiety (see below for further information). (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Leda Cosmides and John Tooby noted that William James (1842-1910) argued that humans have more instincts than animals, and that greater freedom of action is the result of having more psychological instincts, not fewer. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • This difference in theory can be seen in research on modern human sexual preferences, with behaviourists arguing that attraction has conditioning influences, such as from the media or cultural norms, while others arguing it is based on psychological adaptations. (wikipedia.org)
  • While psychological knowledge is often applied to the assessment and treatment of mental health problems, it is also directed towards understanding and solving problems in several spheres of human activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, he encourages such evidence to be obtained: "Whether human males possess psychological adaptations for rape will only be answered by careful studies seeking evidence for such cognitive specializations. (wikipedia.org)
  • More recently, she and her colleagues at the Aga Khan University Institute for Human Development in Nairobi, Kenya and the Alliance for Human Development have focused on the adaptation, implementation, and evaluation of approaches to improve development. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical
  • Adolescence (from Latin adolescere, meaning 'to grow up') is a transitional stage of physical and psychological development that generally occurs during the period from puberty to legal adulthood (age of majority). (wikipedia.org)
  • Adolescence is usually associated with the teenage years, but its physical, psychological or cultural expressions may begin earlier and end later. (wikipedia.org)
  • Puberty is a period of several years in which rapid physical growth and psychological changes occur, culminating in sexual maturity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stressful events, such as job changes, may result in insomnia, impaired sleeping, and physical and psychological health complaints. (wikipedia.org)
  • environment
  • His model supports that the capacity for language is a psychological adaptation (involving both the language necessary brain structures and disposition for language acquisition), however, children lack any particular instantiation of language at birth, and must instead learn one in the their environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • Ukrainian) "Integrative processes of teambuilding groups: socio-psychological and ethnic aspects:" V.I. Bochelyuk, N.Y. Zavatskaya, A.A. Samoilov, Ed. N.Y. Zavatskaya.Luhansk, Alchevsk: Center for Career Planning, 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • fall
  • The SSSM has retained and reified the nature/nurture dichotomy, and its practitioners have meticulously amassed evidence over the years which 'proves' that the overwhelming majority of psychological phenomena fall in the 'nurture' category. (wikipedia.org)
  • knowledge
  • Ukrainian) "Management process and formation of organizational culture in higher school: socio-psychological aspect: N.Y. Zavatskaya, O.A. Mitichkina, Ed. N.Y. Zavatskaya.Luhansk: Publishing House "Knowledge", 2013 .192 p. (wikipedia.org)
  • evidence
  • There is extensive evidence that incest avoidance, which is the tendency to avoid sexual intercourse with close relatives is an evolved behavioural adaptation. (wikipedia.org)
  • aspects
  • Ukrainian) "Sociocultural and psychological aspects of adaptation of the individual in modern society : monograph, Ed. N.Y. Zavatskaya. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ukrainian) "Socialpsychological aspects of youth adaptation to the market economy: N.Y. Zavatskaya, V.Y. Kharchenko, Ed. N.Y. Zavatskaya.Luhansk: East Ukrainian National University named after V. Dahl, 2012.228 p. (wikipedia.org)